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By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | October 21, 1994
Jacqueline Bouknight, held at the Baltimore City Detention Center for more than six years, now has lost special access to her attorney at what sources describe as a crucial point in her case.Ms. Bouknight has been held in civil contempt of court since April 28, 1988, for refusing to reveal to social workers the whereabouts of her young son, whom she had been suspected of abusing. A number of lawyers and law professors interviewed cite hers as the longest incarceration in memory for civil contempt.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 18, 2006
NEW YORK -- Former financier Martin Armstrong, who has spent six years in jail for defying a judge's order, pleaded guilty yesterday to federal charges that he conspired to defraud Japanese investors out of millions of dollars. Armstrong, the former money manager and founder of Princeton Economics International Ltd., faces up to five more years in prison after admitting that he lied to investors about losses incurred by his fund in commodities futures trades. "By falsely representing to investors that my trading performance was better than it actually was, what I was doing was wrong and improper," Armstrong, 57, told U.S. District Judge John Keenan in New York.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 18, 2006
NEW YORK -- Former financier Martin Armstrong, who has spent six years in jail for defying a judge's order, pleaded guilty yesterday to federal charges that he conspired to defraud Japanese investors out of millions of dollars. Armstrong, the former money manager and founder of Princeton Economics International Ltd., faces up to five more years in prison after admitting that he lied to investors about losses incurred by his fund in commodities futures trades. "By falsely representing to investors that my trading performance was better than it actually was, what I was doing was wrong and improper," Armstrong, 57, told U.S. District Judge John Keenan in New York.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 30, 2005
I haven't heard any of the allegedly liberal Democratic candidates for U.S. Senate mention it, but the leading Republican candidate did - and on the first day of his campaign. Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele visited one of the I Can't We Can residential drug-treatment centers ("Change you must, or die you will") in Baltimore, then went to lunch and challenged a group of business owners to give ex-offenders a chance by putting them to work. Amazing. A public official in Maryland asked business people to consider hiring recovering drug addicts as a way of breaking the costly and depressing cycle of crime-incarceration-unemployment-crime.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1995
On her first full day of freedom, Jacqueline L. Bouknight said yesterday that she did not spend 7 1/2 years in jail for civil contempt in vain if it meant her son, Maurice, was in a home "where he don't have to be harassed and stuff, like I was."Being incarcerated was "just something I just had to do," Ms. Bouknight said during a brief news conference at the office of her lawyer, M. Cristina Gutierrez. "It was what I believed in. It was right."Judge David B. Mitchell ordered Ms. Bouknight, 29, released from the Baltimore City Detention Center on Tuesday, 2,741 days after she went to jail on a civil contempt order for refusing to produce Maurice.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | March 26, 1991
A federal judge has declined for the second time to cite two assistant Baltimore County attorneys for criminal contempt for hiding evidence from plaintiffs in a 1987 civil case against county police.In an order dated last Friday, Judge Joseph C. Howard held the two attorneys, John A. Austin and James G. Beach 3rd, in civil contempt of court and fined them $7,500 each for violating a court order.But the judge, without comment, rejected criminal contempt citations recommended last month by court-appointed special prosecutor W. Neil Eggleston.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | February 19, 1991
A court-appointed special prosecutor has proposed federal criminal contempt charges against two assistant Baltimore County attorneys who are alleged to have hidden evidence from plaintiffs in a 1987 civil case against county police.W. Neil Eggleston, the special prosecutor, filed the "superseding notice of charges" against James G. Beach 3rd and John A. Austin in U.S. District Court in Baltimore late Friday.On Feb. 6, Judge Joseph C. Howard quietly filed a letter that announced his intention to pursue such proceedings.
NEWS
August 2, 1999
THE FINE levied on President Clinton by federal District Judge Susan Webber Wright in Little Rock, Ark., and the indictment of Linda Tripp by the Howard Country grand jury, treat those two as ordinary Americans subject to the same laws as everyone else.There was a lot of sound and fury to get there, but it is the proper destination.Judge Wright's assessment of $89,484.05 on President Clinton was tying up a loose end.Her basic finding was a civil contempt order last April, holding that Mr. Clinton had given "false, misleading and evasive answers that were designed to obstruct the judicial process."
NEWS
October 31, 1994
The case of Jacqueline Bouknight is doubly mysterious, and doubly troubling. She has been jailed for 6 1/2 years without having been charged with a crime, let alone convicted of one. Some of the facts are cloaked in secrecy. Should the open-ended civil contempt ruling against Ms. Bouknight be lifted on the ground that it has conspicuously failed to accomplish its purpose?Hardly anyone is in a position to render an informed opinion, and the few who are have been legally gagged. Some of them, moreover, may be protecting their own professional reputations as much as they are protecting the child's welfare.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 30, 2005
I haven't heard any of the allegedly liberal Democratic candidates for U.S. Senate mention it, but the leading Republican candidate did - and on the first day of his campaign. Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele visited one of the I Can't We Can residential drug-treatment centers ("Change you must, or die you will") in Baltimore, then went to lunch and challenged a group of business owners to give ex-offenders a chance by putting them to work. Amazing. A public official in Maryland asked business people to consider hiring recovering drug addicts as a way of breaking the costly and depressing cycle of crime-incarceration-unemployment-crime.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2005
Three historic but blighted rowhouses are headed to the auction block tomorrow, an event that could end a long-running battle over the properties that pitted a church-related corporation against the city and an East Baltimore community group. The houses are owned by Apostolic Community Development Corp., an arm of a prominent east-side church. Since 1999, the city has been battling to force the corporation to renovate the houses or get rid of them. Two months ago, a Baltimore Circuit Court judge found the development corporation and Franklin C. Showell, who leads First Apostolic Institutional Faith Church, guilty of civil contempt for not abiding by a February 2003 consent decree that required the properties to be fixed up or sold.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Liz Bowie and Erika Niedowski and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2002
A federal judge warned Baltimore's schools chief and a top deputy yesterday they could be held in contempt and jailed because the district has failed to maintain a computer system that tracks special education students. U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis ordered Chief Executive Officer Carmen V. Russo and Chief Technology Officer Joseph J. Kirkman to appear in court June 10 to determine whether they should be held in civil contempt for a "continuing failure" to comply with orders stemming from a long-running case over the delivery of special education services to about 15,000 students.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 17, 2000
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton asked an Arkansas court panel yesterday to delay an investigation of his ethics until after he leaves office and indicated he will fight to keep his lawyer's license. David E. Kendall, the president's personal lawyer, filed the postponement plea with the Arkansas Committee on Professional Conduct, an arm of the state supreme court that opened an inquiry last month. The investigation focuses on two sets of ethics complaints resulting from Clinton's testimony under oath during the Monica Lewinsky scandal.
NEWS
August 2, 1999
THE FINE levied on President Clinton by federal District Judge Susan Webber Wright in Little Rock, Ark., and the indictment of Linda Tripp by the Howard Country grand jury, treat those two as ordinary Americans subject to the same laws as everyone else.There was a lot of sound and fury to get there, but it is the proper destination.Judge Wright's assessment of $89,484.05 on President Clinton was tying up a loose end.Her basic finding was a civil contempt order last April, holding that Mr. Clinton had given "false, misleading and evasive answers that were designed to obstruct the judicial process."
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1999
Garden snakes, dead rats and scrap metal have led to the lengthiest jail sentence in Baltimore's history of code enforcement violations for a Park Heights man, authorities say.Alan Verschleisser, who owns Potter's Salvage, could be released today from the Baltimore City Detention Center. He was sentenced to 30 days for civil contempt. Twenty days of the sentence were suspended, but if Verschleisser fails to clean up the scrap yard at his Baker Street property in West Baltimore by Oct. 22, he would serve the rest of the sentence.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | May 8, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Independent prosecutor Kenneth Starr has never been more transparently political than in his clumsy attempt to force President Clinton to share responsibility for the new charges facing Susan McDougal.The notion that the president could have been expected to urge any witness in the Whitewater case to testify is ludicrous. If Mr. Clinton wandered into that thicket, he would face a hundred questions about, for example, why he didn't apply similar pressure to Webster Hubbell or anyone else involved in the case.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Liz Bowie and Erika Niedowski and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2002
A federal judge warned Baltimore's schools chief and a top deputy yesterday they could be held in contempt and jailed because the district has failed to maintain a computer system that tracks special education students. U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis ordered Chief Executive Officer Carmen V. Russo and Chief Technology Officer Joseph J. Kirkman to appear in court June 10 to determine whether they should be held in civil contempt for a "continuing failure" to comply with orders stemming from a long-running case over the delivery of special education services to about 15,000 students.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1995
Saying he was taking the action "with great reluctance," a deputy state attorney general formally asked a judge yesterday to release Jacqueline L. Bouknight, but he also sought to prevent her from contacting the son whose whereabouts she has guarded for more than seven years.The action means that Ms. Bouknight, who has been in jail for civil contempt of court since shortly after her child disappeared in 1988, is likely to be released at a hearing Tuesday.Deputy Attorney General Ralph S. Tyler III has argued for years that Ms. Bouknight should remain jailed as long as there was hope that jail would persuade her to produce the boy, whom she previously abused.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | November 12, 1995
AFTER ALL THE legal wrangling, the days of national media attention and the years of complete quiet, on Halloween night Jacqueline L. Bouknight stepped from jail, ending a seven-year battle of wills. She never produced her young son, Maurice, as a judge had ordered, nor was she ever charged with a crime against the child. Her release left an overwhelming question: Why did it take so long to get nowhere?Listen to Baltimore Circuit Judge David B. Mitchell, facing the bickering lawyers in front of him Feb. 13, 1991.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1995
On her first full day of freedom, Jacqueline L. Bouknight said yesterday that she did not spend 7 1/2 years in jail for civil contempt in vain if it meant her son, Maurice, was in a home "where he don't have to be harassed and stuff, like I was."Being incarcerated was "just something I just had to do," Ms. Bouknight said during a brief news conference at the office of her lawyer, M. Cristina Gutierrez. "It was what I believed in. It was right."Judge David B. Mitchell ordered Ms. Bouknight, 29, released from the Baltimore City Detention Center on Tuesday, 2,741 days after she went to jail on a civil contempt order for refusing to produce Maurice.
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