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By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
Amid the businesslike comings and goings around Annapolis's historic courthouse is an increasingly common sight: newlyweds emerging from a civil ceremony with friends, family and flowers. From formally attired couples dashing into limos to giggling jean-clad couples riding off on the city's red trolley, from starry-eyed teens to people stepping into a second marriage -- such scenes add to the charm of the courthouse in the state capital's Historic District, where about 1,200 couples a year choose to wed. Robert P. Duckworth, clerk of the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, said he strives to make each civil ceremony memorable for each couple, whether they come by themselves or bring 50 guests.
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NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 10, 2005
Cable news channels took off the gloves yesterday in their coverage of the wedding of Prince Charles to Camilla Parker Bowles. Perhaps it was the proximity of American TV news anchors and correspondents to their Fleet Street tabloid brethren. Or maybe, the cable news gang simply felt the need to get snarky after having to be on its very best behavior in covering the funeral of Pope John Paul II in Rome. Whatever the reason, rather than reporting the story of the royal wedding in a journalistically straightforward manner, cable news channels CNN, Fox News and MSNBC wallowed through four hours of sarcasm and snide commentary that stopped just short of heckling.
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FEATURES
April 18, 1996
Today in history: April 18In 1775, Paul Revere began his famous ride from Charlestown to Lexington, Mass., warning American colonists that the British were coming.In 1906, a devastating earthquake struck San Francisco, followed by raging fires.In 1945, famed American war correspondent Ernie Pyle, 44, was killed by Japanese gunfire on a Pacific island off Okinawa.In 1956, actress Grace Kelly married Prince Rainier of Monaco in a civil ceremony.In 1983, 62 people, including 17 Americans, were killed at the U.S. Embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, by a suicide bomber.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2005
At most weddings, the bride is queen for a day. But when your mother-in-law-to-be is the queen, just whose day is it, anyway? News that Queen Elizabeth II will not attend the April 8 town-hall civil ceremony uniting her son Prince Charles and longtime love Camilla Parker Bowles had British tabloids atwitter yesterday, with the announcement viewed as evidence that the monarch will never accept the prince's mistress as his wife. But royal watchers and etiquette experts said yesterday that the queen is doing the right thing.
FEATURES
By Newsday | January 8, 1995
Couples in a hurry to tie the knot on vacation in Antigua and Barbuda can now get a marriage license on the spot in the twin island Caribbean nation. The government there has rescinded its three-business-days minimum residency requirement before accepting a marriage license application.The smitten twosome need only appear at the ministry of justice in the capital of St. John's to fill out the necessary forms before a marriage coordinator and fork over the $150 licensing fee. The marriage coordinator arranges for a marriage officer to perform a civil ceremony at any hotel or another venue selected by the couple for an additional $100 fee.For more information on civil and religious ceremonies, call the islands' Department of Tourism, (212)
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 10, 2005
Cable news channels took off the gloves yesterday in their coverage of the wedding of Prince Charles to Camilla Parker Bowles. Perhaps it was the proximity of American TV news anchors and correspondents to their Fleet Street tabloid brethren. Or maybe, the cable news gang simply felt the need to get snarky after having to be on its very best behavior in covering the funeral of Pope John Paul II in Rome. Whatever the reason, rather than reporting the story of the royal wedding in a journalistically straightforward manner, cable news channels CNN, Fox News and MSNBC wallowed through four hours of sarcasm and snide commentary that stopped just short of heckling.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2005
At most weddings, the bride is queen for a day. But when your mother-in-law-to-be is the queen, just whose day is it, anyway? News that Queen Elizabeth II will not attend the April 8 town-hall civil ceremony uniting her son Prince Charles and longtime love Camilla Parker Bowles had British tabloids atwitter yesterday, with the announcement viewed as evidence that the monarch will never accept the prince's mistress as his wife. But royal watchers and etiquette experts said yesterday that the queen is doing the right thing.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2003
The bride -- one of them, at least -- wore a scoop-necked, full-skirted wedding gown, a pearl tiara and dainty glass slippers. And, over everything, a T-shirt with red gothic lettering that spelled the word trouble. She was Nancy F. Fischer, a 23-year-old from Dundalk. She stood in the crowded Baltimore County courthouse hallway as her betrothed, a 25-year-old volunteer firefighter from Dundalk named Jimmy E. Dennison, paid $25 for the ceremony and put their names on a list. She soon got rid of the T-shirt -- to look more the part, she said -- and waited.
NEWS
August 13, 1993
A 28-year-old Reisterstown woman who married a Howard County man two years ago while she was still married to at least one other man pleaded guilty in Carroll Circuit Court yesterday to one count of bigamy.Laura Lee Marsden could face up to nine years in state prison for the felony when she is sentenced by Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. on Oct. 14.According to court records, Marsden married Paul Ray Marsden, 25, in a Carroll County civil ceremony on June 28, 1991.However, she was still married to William John Januska Jr., 31, of Reisterstown.
NEWS
May 17, 2009
Murray J. Adams, Jr., well known vintage car collector and a respected contributor/member of the Catonsville Community for the last 50 plus years, was married to Ms. Gloria Nuestro Uy in a civil ceremony in Towson, MD on 12/23/08, followed by a Dinner Reception. Murray is a graduate of St. Paul's School, Calvert Hall College, University of Baltimore, and New York Institute of Finance. Murray is a former Financial Controller of Baker Watts & Co., and CEO of his firm, American Senior Financial Services, now retired living in the High Fields section of Catonsville.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
Amid the businesslike comings and goings around Annapolis's historic courthouse is an increasingly common sight: newlyweds emerging from a civil ceremony with friends, family and flowers. From formally attired couples dashing into limos to giggling jean-clad couples riding off on the city's red trolley, from starry-eyed teens to people stepping into a second marriage -- such scenes add to the charm of the courthouse in the state capital's Historic District, where about 1,200 couples a year choose to wed. Robert P. Duckworth, clerk of the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, said he strives to make each civil ceremony memorable for each couple, whether they come by themselves or bring 50 guests.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2003
The bride -- one of them, at least -- wore a scoop-necked, full-skirted wedding gown, a pearl tiara and dainty glass slippers. And, over everything, a T-shirt with red gothic lettering that spelled the word trouble. She was Nancy F. Fischer, a 23-year-old from Dundalk. She stood in the crowded Baltimore County courthouse hallway as her betrothed, a 25-year-old volunteer firefighter from Dundalk named Jimmy E. Dennison, paid $25 for the ceremony and put their names on a list. She soon got rid of the T-shirt -- to look more the part, she said -- and waited.
FEATURES
April 18, 1998
Today in history: April 18In 1775, Paul Revere began his famous ride from Charlestown to Lexington, Mass., warning American colonists that the British were coming.In 1906, a devastating earthquake struck San Francisco, followed by raging fires. About 700 people died.In 1923, the first game was played in Yankee Stadium. The Yankees defeated the Boston Red Sox 4-1.In 1955, physicist Albert Einstein died in Princeton, N.J.In 1956, actress Grace Kelly married Prince Rainier of Monaco in a civil ceremony.
FEATURES
By Newsday | January 8, 1995
Couples in a hurry to tie the knot on vacation in Antigua and Barbuda can now get a marriage license on the spot in the twin island Caribbean nation. The government there has rescinded its three-business-days minimum residency requirement before accepting a marriage license application.The smitten twosome need only appear at the ministry of justice in the capital of St. John's to fill out the necessary forms before a marriage coordinator and fork over the $150 licensing fee. The marriage coordinator arranges for a marriage officer to perform a civil ceremony at any hotel or another venue selected by the couple for an additional $100 fee.For more information on civil and religious ceremonies, call the islands' Department of Tourism, (212)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | January 18, 1996
Southern exposureHelp celebrate the birthdays of General Robert E. Lee and General Stonewall Jackson on Saturday at the Lee-Jackson Monument at Art Museum and Wyman Park drives in Baltimore.The annual Civil War ceremony will include Confederate and Federal re-enactment troops and music.The ceremony is at 11 a.m. Saturday. Call (410) 296-9235 or (410) 747-3271. Bring the entire family to the Walters Art Gallery for an "Animal Safari" and a casual afternoon on Sunday.Activities will include crafts, games and adventurous gallery tours.
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