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NEWS
By Seth Goldman | April 7, 1993
WHILE sparks may fly about other details of President Clinton's economic plan, his national service proposal will send powerful beacons of opportunity and hope to America's youth. Some early beams have already been sighted in Baltimore.Although the final details of the president's plan have not been announced, the goal is to offer young adults loans for college or job training in exchange for a year or two of service.Young men and women will act as neighborhood police, teachers' aides, assistants in community health centers.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
A Baltimore nonprofit AmeriCorps program will receive $200,000 in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant money to train 72 city residents for careers in environmental cleanup work. The nonprofit, Civic Works, was one of 18 groups nationwide that were awarded a combined $3.6 million through the agency's Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training program. "This funding will expand the workforce needed in Baltimore to reuse and revitalize contaminated properties," EPA mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin said in a statement.
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NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | February 23, 1993
Civic Works, the kind of youth service corps being championed by President Clinton as part of his domestic agenda to reshape America, officially kicked off its Baltimore program yesterday.At Civic Works, housed in the historic Clifton Mansion in Northeast Baltimore, 25 males and females, who range in ages from 17 to 25, will learn carpentry, landscaping, construction skills and health care.Civic Works' officials hope that with those skills will come self-esteem and pride in teamwork and the place where they live.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 22, 2013
Hoping to help more homeowners lower their utility bills, a Baltimore nonprofit is challenging area neighborhoods to engage in a little friendly competition to see which can get the most home energy retrofits done before winter arrives. Civic Works , which has improved energy efficiency in more than 250 homes over the past two years, launched a new campaign today aimed at getting neighborhoods to vie for recognition as the "greenest" in the metro area by enlisting residents in upgrading insulation and sealing air leaks in their homes, among other improvements.
NEWS
By Kaana Smith and Kaana Smith,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1996
Armed with hammers and construction helmets and wearing their signature red T-shirts, seven youths from inner-city Baltimore set out yesterday to make a neighborhood a little safer and to work toward a successful future.Members of Civic Works, a city program for training youths, they were in Reservoir Hill boarding up their 500th vacant home.The sounds of electric drills and the pounding of hammers attracted the attention of curious children and adults who watched from upstairs windows and front stoops as the youths climbed ladders and carried plywood outside the house at 708 Newington Ave.Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III also watched.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
A Baltimore nonprofit AmeriCorps program will receive $200,000 in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant money to train 72 city residents for careers in environmental cleanup work. The nonprofit, Civic Works, was one of 18 groups nationwide that were awarded a combined $3.6 million through the agency's Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training program. "This funding will expand the workforce needed in Baltimore to reuse and revitalize contaminated properties," EPA mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2010
Less than four years ago, Bill Harmon lived hand to mouth on the streets of Baltimore, struggled with a drug addiction that depleted his savings and had no prospects for a job with a future. These days, a drug-free Harmon has a job he believes is the future, thanks to a green careers training program run by Civic Works, Baltimore's urban service corps. Harmon, 56, works as a field technician in the burgeoning environmental industry, where he tests for contaminated soil on construction sites and helps contain hazardous material during demolitions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SLOANE BROWN | May 21, 2000
There's nothing quite like dining on the front lawn of a grand old house, reveling in a summery evening, and relaxing after an afternoon golf game. That's what Civic Works offered 200 supporters at its second-annual "Spring Swing -- Golf Tournament and Dinner Auction" at Clifton Mansion. As guests supped and socialized, the sounds of songbirds mingled in the background with 1940s swing music, recalling an earlier era. In the crowd: Dana Gans and Randy LeFaivre, event co-chairs; Marc Bunting and Stuart Brooks, event committee members; Dana Stein, Civic Works president and executive director; Tony Hawkins, Civic Works board chair; city Councilwoman Helen Holton, Mimi Roeder Vaughan, Tricia Ellis and Fred Struever, board members; Bev Thomas, Baltimore community activist; Rob Bostick, BGE marketing and energy services manager; Paul Ellis, ReVisions Foundation executive director; Diane Gordy, state administrator; Chuck Goldsborough, Team Lexus league driver; Steve Hazan, Bank of America vice president; Terry McDonnell, general sales manager for Carroll County Foods; Sibyl Kane, AmeriCorps VISTA volunteer; and Tony Pagnotti, WMAR-TV personality.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | February 26, 2009
Nonprofit offers free tips on saving energy You can save money by making your home energy-efficient. And now you can get help with that, too. The nonprofit Civic Works will do the job for free for low- to moderate-income residents in the neighborhoods of Belair-Edison, Harwood, Waverly and Coldstream Homestead Montebello. As part of "Project Lightbulb," the group will replace 15 incandescent light bulbs in your home with compact fluorescent lights that use 25 percent less electricity.
NEWS
By Katy O'Donnell and Katy O'Donnell,SUN REPORTER | December 10, 2007
As temperatures plummet and fuel prices soar, many Maryland residents are dreading the coming winter months. But 300 low- to moderate- income homes in Northeast Baltimore are getting a boost from Project Light Bulb, an energy-efficiency initiative undertaken by the urban service corps Civic Works. The three-month pilot program, which began last week, has pledged to provide energy-conserving devices to residents of the Coldstream-Homestead-Montebello and Belair-Edison neighborhoods who are struggling with their utilities bills.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | July 12, 2013
A thorough housecleaning of Clifton Mansion has revealed the potential inside this Northeast Baltimore treasure, marking the beginning of a long-overdue, $7 million restoration. Even now, in its early state, you could charge admission. I toured the place, the centerpiece of a city park, I had visited on numerous previous occasions and felt as if I had stepped inside for the first time. I experienced Clifton's grandeur, observed an emerging architectural pedigree and realized its potential.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2013
John Marra's full-time job is an assistant community lot projects coordinator at Civic Works. But his second job, although he works for free, is quartermaster of puppets for the Baltimore Rock Opera Society. "We get paid in glory," said Marra, 28, who is originally from Queens, N.Y., but now lives in Harwood. The Baltimore Rock Opera Society began in 2007. It is a completely volunteer organization "on a mission to melt faces and blow minds with the power of rock theater for next 7,000 years," Marra said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
Clifton Mansion still towers over Baltimore, but decades of neglect are eroding its underpinnings. Wood is rotting on the signature porches of the 19th-century building. Water stains the walls of its elegant salon. Job-training students wear gloves and hats in winter to ward off cold from a wall of aging windows. Plaster is crumbling, floors need refinishing and research must be done to preserve murals, stencils and paintings. The Italianate stucco home, Johns Hopkins' summer estate in what is now Clifton Park in Northeast Baltimore, is about to undergo a $7 million renovation to restore those gracefully arched porches and floor-to-ceiling windows.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2010
Less than four years ago, Bill Harmon lived hand to mouth on the streets of Baltimore, struggled with a drug addiction that depleted his savings and had no prospects for a job with a future. These days, a drug-free Harmon has a job he believes is the future, thanks to a green careers training program run by Civic Works, Baltimore's urban service corps. Harmon, 56, works as a field technician in the burgeoning environmental industry, where he tests for contaminated soil on construction sites and helps contain hazardous material during demolitions.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
The Open Society Institute of Baltimore, a foundation funded by billionaire philanthropist George Soros, is giving $1.5 million to four city nonprofits for job training for low-income residents. The award will be accompanied by another $1.5 million of state and federal funds. The $3 million in funding will help provide job training and placement services to 141 people with criminal convictions who otherwise would be unable to find work. The four nonprofits receiving funding are the Center for Urban Families, Civic Works, Group Ministries and the Job Opportunities Task Force.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | February 7, 2010
Ann Roberts' East Baltimore rowhouse is older than she is, but not by much. Her narrow brick home on East Preston Street has been around, she said, "for a hundred years-plus." Roberts is 90 years old. She is still able to negotiate the stairs in her four-story home and takes pride in keeping her residence in shape. "This is a tough house," she said as she launched into a story of how some years ago it had withstood being hit by a tractor-trailer. "These boys, 16 and 14, stole the truck, were chased by the police, then lost control and came right in the living room."
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 22, 2013
Hoping to help more homeowners lower their utility bills, a Baltimore nonprofit is challenging area neighborhoods to engage in a little friendly competition to see which can get the most home energy retrofits done before winter arrives. Civic Works , which has improved energy efficiency in more than 250 homes over the past two years, launched a new campaign today aimed at getting neighborhoods to vie for recognition as the "greenest" in the metro area by enlisting residents in upgrading insulation and sealing air leaks in their homes, among other improvements.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
Clifton Mansion still towers over Baltimore, but decades of neglect are eroding its underpinnings. Wood is rotting on the signature porches of the 19th-century building. Water stains the walls of its elegant salon. Job-training students wear gloves and hats in winter to ward off cold from a wall of aging windows. Plaster is crumbling, floors need refinishing and research must be done to preserve murals, stencils and paintings. The Italianate stucco home, Johns Hopkins' summer estate in what is now Clifton Park in Northeast Baltimore, is about to undergo a $7 million renovation to restore those gracefully arched porches and floor-to-ceiling windows.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | December 17, 2009
Though it's nearly freezing outside, fresh arugula, kale and more greens are flourishing in Hoop Village. That's the name given to Baltimore's newest urban farming venture - a trio of plastic-skinned hoop greenhouses on the historic Lake Clifton schools campus. The structures, finished in October, are already yielding harvests that will provide wholesome snacks to some city elementary students this winter. And students at the three Lake Clifton schools are helping to raise the food they'll be eating.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 17, 2009
Though it's nearly freezing outside, fresh arugula, kale and more greens are flourishing in Hoop Village. That's the name given to Baltimore's newest urban farming venture - a trio of plastic-skinned hoop greenhouses on the historic Lake Clifton schools campus. The structures, finished in October, are already yielding harvests that will provide wholesome snacks to some city elementary students this winter. And students at the three Lake Clifton schools are helping to raise the food they'll be eating.
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