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NEWS
March 5, 2012
It is ironic that The Sun titled its editorial on voter ID laws "The phantom menace" (Feb. 27). The "Phantom Menace" in the Star Wars trilogy actually refers to a dark force in politics that hides in plain sight pretending to be a public servant. Similarly, the Brennan Center for Justice cited in your editorial claims to be a nonpartisan organization in service of the public good, but it actually takes positions against laws that would prevent fraud in elections. The Brennan Center's outrageous statistics about the number of voters without identification have been discredited by former Federal Elections Commission member Hans von Spakovsky, an election law scholar.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 26, 2014
I can't remember a primary in which I didn't vote. I can't even recall a primary in which I didn't volunteer to help a candidate. Yesterday was no different. Therefore it was heartbreaking to stand on a corner to hand out material and have no one to give it to. Not only did it make me sad, it made me angry ( "Excuse us while we don't bother to vote," June 25). Dan Rodricks points out the struggles voters elsewhere endure to cast their ballots. However, his lecture won't change the American culture of detachment and selfishness.
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EXPLORE
January 14, 2013
Our neighborhood is beginning its annual, seasonal, new year morphing, with a handful of businesses closing and a slate of new businesses opening. The keyword in 2013 appears to be pizza, with three new pizza joints either already open (Birroteca) or scheduled to open (Arthouse and Paulie Gee's Hampden). I'll let the dust settle before highlighting a lot of what's going on and instead I'll begin this column with a parable, or, more accurately, an anecdotal warning.  It was a typical Friday morning when I gathered up my emptied recycling bins, brought them inside, put them back in their usual locations and got about the business of my day. But as the day progressed, every so often I'd catch of whiff of something unpleasant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
What a sorry state of affairs I discovered last week when I started reporting the TV aspect of the first Democratic gubernatorial debate. I quickly came to understand that Baltimoreans would not be seeing the event, which will be staged Wednesday at the University of Maryland, College Park and produced by WRC-TV, the NBC-owned station in Washington. But how could that be, especially with three candidates hardly known in the city: Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Del. Heather R. Mizeur?
NEWS
November 8, 1990
Most callers to The Evening Sun's SUNDIAL voted yesterda because it was their civic duty.A total of 434 people called. The majority, 77 percent (335 of 434) said they voted. Of the people who voted, 120 (36 percent) said they voted because of concern over taxes, 88 (26 percent) said they voted out of loyalty to a candidate or political party and 284 (85 percent) voted because they thought it was their civic duty.Of the 23 percent (99 of 434) of the people who didn't vote, 30 (30 percent) said it was because of a lack of interest in this election, 41 (39 percent)
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2005
On Day 2 of deliberations in a city murder case, the jury foreman passed an unusual note to the judge: "After arriving home from jury duties I found out my son had been [shot] in the head." There was more: "I am prepared to continue if this is your will." Even as his only son lay dying in the hospital, Bobby Anderson Sr. kept deliberating with 11 fellow jurors. A day later, Anderson came to court with another message for Baltimore Circuit Judge David W. Young. His son had died overnight.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1998
An article in the Howard County edition of The Sun yesterday incorrectly reported the primary vote received by Howard County Register of Wills Kay Hartleb. She received 8,782 votes to 3,077 for her Republican opponent. In the uncontested Democratic primary, Patricia S. Gordon received 13,640 votes.The Sun regrets the error.They do not seek judgeships. They aren't vying to be top prosecutors and there's no gun to sport.In fact, many observers agree the positions probably are the least glamorous jobs in the Howard County circuit courthouse.
NEWS
April 19, 2013
Regardless of whether a man or woman joins an international organization like al-Qaida or simply acts alone, terrorism has wended its hellish way into the very fiber of our society ("At least 3 dead, scores injured in Boston blasts," April 16). So this the brave new world. The concepts behind terrorism are entirely antithetical to the rules and strictures our country was founded on. America has become the hunted, not the hunter. There are thousands of anti-Americans, mercenaries, and religious zealots who despise America, and all for which it stands.
NEWS
June 26, 2014
I can't remember a primary in which I didn't vote. I can't even recall a primary in which I didn't volunteer to help a candidate. Yesterday was no different. Therefore it was heartbreaking to stand on a corner to hand out material and have no one to give it to. Not only did it make me sad, it made me angry ( "Excuse us while we don't bother to vote," June 25). Dan Rodricks points out the struggles voters elsewhere endure to cast their ballots. However, his lecture won't change the American culture of detachment and selfishness.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
It was Jury Duty: Celebrity Edition in Baltimore Circuit Court on Tuesday. Both Michael Phelps and Duff Goldman had their numbers picked for the jury pool at the downtown courthouse. Phelps' presence created such a buzz that other prospective jurors and employees throughout the courthouse started streaming in to take his picture, according to Maj. Sam Cogen of the sheriff's office. “People were using their cell phones [to take pictures], bothering him - including police,” Cogen said.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
Members of a Baltimore jury were reminded on Thursday to act civil toward each other as they continue to deliberate a murder and murder conspiracy trial that has kept them in close quarters for four days. Thursday afternoon, a jury of eight black women, two black men, a white man and a white woman walked into the Baltimore City Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown's courtroom and sat down for a lecture on decorum. The jurors had been debating the fates of three men who allegedly reacted to the killing of a family member by taking revenge on people throughout a neighborhood block.
NEWS
April 19, 2013
Regardless of whether a man or woman joins an international organization like al-Qaida or simply acts alone, terrorism has wended its hellish way into the very fiber of our society ("At least 3 dead, scores injured in Boston blasts," April 16). So this the brave new world. The concepts behind terrorism are entirely antithetical to the rules and strictures our country was founded on. America has become the hunted, not the hunter. There are thousands of anti-Americans, mercenaries, and religious zealots who despise America, and all for which it stands.
EXPLORE
January 14, 2013
Our neighborhood is beginning its annual, seasonal, new year morphing, with a handful of businesses closing and a slate of new businesses opening. The keyword in 2013 appears to be pizza, with three new pizza joints either already open (Birroteca) or scheduled to open (Arthouse and Paulie Gee's Hampden). I'll let the dust settle before highlighting a lot of what's going on and instead I'll begin this column with a parable, or, more accurately, an anecdotal warning.  It was a typical Friday morning when I gathered up my emptied recycling bins, brought them inside, put them back in their usual locations and got about the business of my day. But as the day progressed, every so often I'd catch of whiff of something unpleasant.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2012
It was Jury Duty: Celebrity Edition in Baltimore Circuit Court on Tuesday. Both Michael Phelps and Duff Goldman had their numbers picked for the jury pool at the downtown courthouse. Phelps' presence created such a buzz that other prospective jurors and employees throughout the courthouse started streaming in to take his picture, according to Maj. Sam Cogen of the sheriff's office. “People were using their cell phones [to take pictures], bothering him - including police,” Cogen said.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 13, 2012
Over the years at Camden Yards — and, of course, I mean the many bad years — I would be drawn into conversations with parents with little kids, especially if the little kids were decked out in Red Sox shirts and hats. "Where are you from?" I'd ask, curious if the parents had driven from my native New England for a game. "Cockeysville," would be the answer. Or "Catonsville. " Or "Clarksville," or some other "ville" in metropolitan Baltimore. Then I'd ask if the parents had grown up in New England.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
It is ironic that The Sun titled its editorial on voter ID laws "The phantom menace" (Feb. 27). The "Phantom Menace" in the Star Wars trilogy actually refers to a dark force in politics that hides in plain sight pretending to be a public servant. Similarly, the Brennan Center for Justice cited in your editorial claims to be a nonpartisan organization in service of the public good, but it actually takes positions against laws that would prevent fraud in elections. The Brennan Center's outrageous statistics about the number of voters without identification have been discredited by former Federal Elections Commission member Hans von Spakovsky, an election law scholar.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | September 8, 2002
A Memorable Place By Barbara Kaplan Bass SPECIAL TO THE SUN Making the news in a Philadelphia park I enter the park through one of the grand balustrades. I love strolling with my granddaughter in this urban Philadelphia sanctuary, past the wizened women in wheelchairs pushed by their nurses, past students and young lovers on park benches, past the lawyers and secretaries seeking a brief respite in the park. What a lucky child my 18-month-old granddaughter is to have Rittenhouse Square as her back yard.
NEWS
By Stan Lichtenstein | January 15, 1991
TODAY I choose to write about "choice" -- no, not "choice" as in pro-choice vs. pro-life, but choice as the basic principle that should govern the most significant aspects of living free in a free society. You may ignore what I have to say, if you choose.My preachments on this subject are prompted by various political phenomena apart from the abortion rights controversy, and especially by the current "anti-incumbency" fever manifested in moves to limit terms of office so that no one will be re-elected "too many" times.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2005
On Day 2 of deliberations in a city murder case, the jury foreman passed an unusual note to the judge: "After arriving home from jury duties I found out my son had been [shot] in the head." There was more: "I am prepared to continue if this is your will." Even as his only son lay dying in the hospital, Bobby Anderson Sr. kept deliberating with 11 fellow jurors. A day later, Anderson came to court with another message for Baltimore Circuit Judge David W. Young. His son had died overnight.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 3, 2005
By the time the bell rang in Monique Pierre-Philippe's American government class, the students were deep in argument. Did David Diaz know that the backpack his friend had given him contained marijuana? "You cannot miss a 2-pound bag of marijuana," argued Corryn Freeman, a 10th-grader sitting in the front row. Other students disagreed. Diaz said he had not looked in the bag, and they believed him. It was the kind of exchange that Mary Murphy was hoping for when she brought the We the Jury program to Wilde Lake High School yesterday.
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