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By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | April 22, 1992
Swaying to the beat of a tambourine, two dozen families clapped and sang Monday night to kick off a weeklong revival program in Annapolis.Women cried out "Thank you, Jesus," as the Rev. Donald McAllister, pastor of the Redeemer Church of Christ, welcomed the group and prayed for healing. The rousing service was the first of five this week, billed as a "citywide revival," sponsored by the black Pentecostal congregation."I saw a need," said McAllister, who founded the church that has held services at Asbury United Methodist Church on West Street since last August.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Environmentalists will team up Saturday to build support for a 5-cent plastic bag fee in Baltimore by handing out reusable bags and taking part in a citywide cleanup effort. Blue Water Baltimore, Waterfront Partnership, Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Trash Free Maryland Alliance, Clean Water Action and volunteers will fan out across Baltimore to pick up litter in a show of support for legislation introduced by Councilman James B. Kraft that would impose a fee on most plastic bags distributed in the city.
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NEWS
May 18, 1995
Parent involvement in school-improvement teams is among the topics that will be discussed today at the Baltimore school board's fourth citywide public forum.The forum will give parents and the public a chance to voice concerns and ask questions about city schools.It will start at 6:30 p.m. at Coldstream Park Elementary School, 1400 Exeter Hall Ave. in the Waverly area.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and By Erica L. Green | March 24, 2014
A Baltimore city councilwoman is calling on school system leaders to reconsider using a disciplinary tool against more than one-third of principals in order to improve student attendance, saying it takes an entire community to get students to school. Mary Pat Clarke, head of the council's education committee, introduced a resolution Monday that requests more information about the school system's attendance issues and the rationale behind a recent plan that has 61 principals facing pressure to improve attendance in the last few months of the school year.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 30, 2003
WHAT IN the world are these people trying to do to my beloved City College? Not only are they trying to do it to City, they're trying to nail our esteemed rivals at Polytechnic Institute. A third school dear to my heart, Carver Vocational-Technical High School, is on the list. My older sister Barbara graduated from Carver in 1966. That doesn't make me an alumnus, but it sure as heck makes me an alumnus-in-law. Other citywide high schools - Western, Dunbar and Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical among them - are being targeted.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
Attention, residents of Bolton Hill and South Charles Village: The special taxing district you wanted, to pay for better private security and sanitation, is in deep trouble in the legislature.But there is hope, albeit slim. Another measure, a citywide bill that would allow such special districts to supplement municipal services, is still alive -- for the time being.Although the House approved the South Charles Village legislation two weeks ago, the Senate has not considered it. And the Bolton Hill measure has yet to receive even a committee hearing in either chamber.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,[ sun reporter ] | January 18, 2007
A Baltimore education committeerecommended last night that Pimlico Middle School be shuttered this summer as part of the latest round of school closings in the city. Last week, the committee approved a recommendation to close Thomas G. Hayes Elementary this summer and to phase out Lombard Middle, Hamilton Middldle and Canton Middle over the next few years. The recommendations, which grew out of a series of community meetings, will be presented to the school board Tuesday. The board will hold a series of public hearingson all proposed closings during the week of Feb. 10, before voting onthe recommendations Feb. 27. It will be the second of three annual rounds of school closings in Baltimore.
NEWS
April 30, 2008
Baltimore's Spring Cleanup 9 removed 454 tons of debris from city neighborhoods, according to city public works officials. The cleanup - held April 19 - attracted more than 5,500 volunteers from 241 communities across the city. Volunteers and city workers cleaned lots, alleys and sidewalks, while also removing graffiti and weeds, and planting trees and flowers. During last year's fall citywide cleanup, more than 2,500 volunteers removed 855 tons of trash, officials said.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | December 5, 1997
The life span of Baltimore men is 10.3 years shorter than of Baltimore women, which might put Hopkins back in the sex change business.Senator Young is living proof that the deprivations of elective office need be no barrier to getting ahead.At a Washington citywide election for a City Council seat, 7 percent of voters turned out.Save South Korea. Kill its merchant banks.Pub Date: 12/05/97
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Jamie Stiehm and Caitlin Francke and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2002
Following the lead of Chicago and other areas, Baltimore is planning a citywide reading assignment come fall, and the front-running book is the autobiography of Frederick Douglass, the one-time slave who became one of the most important black American leaders of the 19th century. City and library officials confirmed yesterday that they are putting together a program to encourage community reading centered on the city's annual book fair in September. The idea started in Seattle - residents read The Sweet Hereafter by Russell Banks - but gained speed after Chicago's program last year had citizens thumbing through Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird.
BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater and Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Monday she wants to make a tax credit that has been used to spur apartment development downtown available citywide. The new proposal would offer a tax credit for 10 years for projects anywhere in the city, five years less than the existing incentive, the mayor said in her State of the City Address. Rawlings-Blake said the existing credit is helping developers meet demand for rental units and is expected to generate $40 million in new revenue for the city over the next 20 years.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
The number of coveted parking spaces available to the able-bodied on crowded downtown streets is about to shrink as Baltimore begins reserving metered spots for disabled drivers. Earmarking 200 metered spaces in the central business district is the first step in an 18-month plan to reserve 10 percent of spaces citywide. Officials hatched the plan to accommodate disabled drivers and combat the theft of handicapped placards — which until now have let drivers park anywhere in the city for free and have been a favorite target of thieves.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Baltimore plans to give more than 9,000 households huge plastic trash cans on wheels - complete with tracking devices to prevent theft - under a pilot program that, if successful, could lead to a $10 million citywide expansion. The plan is aimed at fighting both litter and rats. The city's Board of Estimates is expected to approve the $578,000 test venture Wednesday. "Not having a trash can is actually a very big factor in rat infestation," said Valentina Ukwuoma, head of the Bureau of Solid Waste.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2013
Baltimore experienced a nearly 5 percent increase in traffic accidents from 2009 to 2012 - a four-year span during which the city rolled out and ramped up its network of now-idle speed cameras, according to state police. Accidents rose from 19,792 in 2009 to 20,718 in 2012, the city's highest total in nine years. Over those four years the city issued more than 1.5 million of the $40 tickets, with a stated purpose of improving safety by getting drivers to slow down in areas around schools.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Baltimore police are looking for arsonists responsible for throwing about a dozen crude incendiary devices at buildings since late April. One of the homes hit by the devices - made from bottles and jugs - belonged to a Muslim family in North Baltimore. A preliminary investigation suggested that the incident was hate-related, Baltimore police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said. But investigators now believe it was one in a series of attacks on apparently random places. "There's a Muslim family who's had an incident and we've talked to them at length," said Baltimore police Sgt. Dennis Raftery, who leads arson investigations.
NEWS
By Mark R. Fetting | December 5, 2012
Tonight, we celebrate the season with the lighting of Baltimore's Washington Monument. But unless we take needed action, we are at risk of losing this festive tradition - along with one of our city's most iconic landmarks. Sadly, the monument has fallen into disrepair and is in serious need of attention due to years of exposure to the elements. It has been closed for safety reasons since June 2010. If we fail to meet the challenge of restoring it, the nation's first monument to George Washington will accelerate its perilous decline and could forever go dark.
NEWS
January 20, 1994
No one should be surprised that the first two schools declared eligible for "reconstitution," a euphemism for state takeover, are Baltimore city "neighborhood" high schools: Douglass to the west, Patterson to the east. Both of these schools have proud histories, particularly Douglass, which lists Thurgood Marshall and Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. among its alumni. But both in recent years have suffered the pathology of urban education: poor academic performance, poor attendance, high dropout rates.
NEWS
January 6, 1991
The District of Columbia is taking strides to replenish its dwindling supply of trees.The push was initiated last month by residents and civic groups PTC who are concerned about the deterioration of streetscapes and the loss of shade trees.An appeal from citizens on upper Massachusetts Avenue in Northwest Washington has spurred the city to severely limit the number of trees developers can cut without permission from the zoning commission.A group of 20 non-profit organizations has formed the Urban Forest Council of Washington to coordinate tree plantings citywide.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Baltimore City police are dealing with a spate of violence that left four men dead and three others wounded Monday in several neighborhoods across the area. The victims were shot in five separate incidents, including double shootings on Boone Street in Better Waverly and on South Eaton Street in Highlandtown, police said. According to Det. Jeremy Silbert, a spokesman for the police department, one victim was shot about 11:45 a.m. in the 2700 block of Beryl Avenue in the Biddle Street neighborhood of East Baltimore.
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