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By Peter Hermann | March 29, 2012
Baltimore Inspector General has released his final report on last year's gambling raid at a Department of Transportation yard. Nearly a dozen workers were arrested, but prosecutors got just one conviction, prompting critics to say the operation was overblown. I interviewed David DeCarlo in January who said he was not involved in the gambling but was caught up as a bystander ( read story here ). He was fighting to get his job back. The IG, David N. McClintock, defended the raid to me in January: If gambling "was going on and it's not anymore, then it was worth it. ... The day everybody is happy with what we're doing is the day we're not doing something right.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
The state, city and CSX Transportation have tentatively selected the Mount Clare train yard in Southwest Baltimore for a roughly $90 million facility where containerized cargo would be transferred from trucks to trains, a project designed to improve the Port of Baltimore's efficiency. The project would help the port and CSX by allowing the railroad to bypass the more than century-old Howard Street Tunnel, which is too low for passage of trains with containers stacked two high. Such double-stacking of truck-sized shipping containers is the most cost-effective way to move them by rail.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | August 28, 2008
Baltimore Director of Transportation Alfred H. Foxx said his department adopted a policy barring officials from participating in city auctions because their positions give them access to information not available to the public. One of Foxx's top aides, deputy director of transportation in charge of operations, Anthony P. Wallnofer Jr., is being investigated by the city's inspector general because he is in possession of 15-foot Eagle motorboat that was auctioned by the city. That boat was purchased at a July 30 auction for $1,900 by Frankford Towing Company, a city firm that has been lobbying the Transportation Department to increase towing fees by $25. "It is a case of fairness," Foxx said.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | March 29, 2012
Baltimore Inspector General has released his final report on last year's gambling raid at a Department of Transportation yard. Nearly a dozen workers were arrested, but prosecutors got just one conviction, prompting critics to say the operation was overblown. I interviewed David DeCarlo in January who said he was not involved in the gambling but was caught up as a bystander ( read story here ). He was fighting to get his job back. The IG, David N. McClintock, defended the raid to me in January: If gambling "was going on and it's not anymore, then it was worth it. ... The day everybody is happy with what we're doing is the day we're not doing something right.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 11, 2006
It took me a few weeks, but I finally got to the bottom of the uniquely Baltimore story involving Kurt Schmoke, Kenny Dutton and 10 yards. You might have heard of this Schmoke guy. He's now the dean of Howard University School of Law, a job in which he seems much happier than the one he held for 12 years as mayor of Baltimore. Before becoming mayor, Schmoke was the city state's attorney. But in 1965, he was a 15-year-old quarterback when the football season at his alma mater, City College, began in September.
NEWS
January 12, 2008
Additional single-stream recycling bins are available from the Baltimore Department of Public Works at the city's yard at 111 Kane St., across from Patterson High School. The yellow bins will be available from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday. The 18-gallon bins cost $5; the 25-gallon bins are $6. City officials ordered 10,000 bins last month but ran out on the first distribution day. An additional 20,000 bins were ordered. Anne Arundel : Harmans Pickup hits tree; driver is killed A Hanover man was killed when he lost control of his pickup truck and slammed into a tree in Harmans, Anne Arundel County police said yesterday.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | May 11, 1992
A pilot flying in the weather-delayed Preakness Week annual hot-air balloon race was injured yesterday when his craft hit a tree and landed in the back yard of a Northeast Baltimore home.Rich Schroeder, of Lancaster, Pa., suffered a fractured vertebra. He was treated at Good Samaritan Hospital and later transferred to Lancaster General Hospital, where he was listed in satisfactory condition last night. His wife, Sharon, said he is scheduled to be released tomorrow . "He should be OK," she said.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | April 22, 2008
Officials from the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health went on the offensive yesterday, defending a 2005 study where researchers spread compost on properties in East Baltimore to see if it abated lead in soils.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
The state, city and CSX Transportation have tentatively selected the Mount Clare train yard in Southwest Baltimore for a roughly $90 million facility where containerized cargo would be transferred from trucks to trains, a project designed to improve the Port of Baltimore's efficiency. The project would help the port and CSX by allowing the railroad to bypass the more than century-old Howard Street Tunnel, which is too low for passage of trains with containers stacked two high. Such double-stacking of truck-sized shipping containers is the most cost-effective way to move them by rail.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | October 23, 2006
The pumpkin patch that the Rev. Roger Scott Powers and his fellow congregants built doesn't offer hayrides. It has no view of rolling pastures or grazing cows, no corn maze, no quaint country shop selling jams made from fresh berries grown on the farm next door. Instead, visitors will likely hear the roar of ambulances, the lurch of city buses stopping nearby and the click-click of fashionable heels hitting the well-traveled sidewalk. There is a lovely view, but it's of 19th-century townhouses.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | August 28, 2008
Baltimore Director of Transportation Alfred H. Foxx said his department adopted a policy barring officials from participating in city auctions because their positions give them access to information not available to the public. One of Foxx's top aides, deputy director of transportation in charge of operations, Anthony P. Wallnofer Jr., is being investigated by the city's inspector general because he is in possession of 15-foot Eagle motorboat that was auctioned by the city. That boat was purchased at a July 30 auction for $1,900 by Frankford Towing Company, a city firm that has been lobbying the Transportation Department to increase towing fees by $25. "It is a case of fairness," Foxx said.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | April 22, 2008
Officials from the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health went on the offensive yesterday, defending a 2005 study where researchers spread compost on properties in East Baltimore to see if it abated lead in soils.
NEWS
January 12, 2008
Additional single-stream recycling bins are available from the Baltimore Department of Public Works at the city's yard at 111 Kane St., across from Patterson High School. The yellow bins will be available from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday. The 18-gallon bins cost $5; the 25-gallon bins are $6. City officials ordered 10,000 bins last month but ran out on the first distribution day. An additional 20,000 bins were ordered. Anne Arundel : Harmans Pickup hits tree; driver is killed A Hanover man was killed when he lost control of his pickup truck and slammed into a tree in Harmans, Anne Arundel County police said yesterday.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 11, 2006
It took me a few weeks, but I finally got to the bottom of the uniquely Baltimore story involving Kurt Schmoke, Kenny Dutton and 10 yards. You might have heard of this Schmoke guy. He's now the dean of Howard University School of Law, a job in which he seems much happier than the one he held for 12 years as mayor of Baltimore. Before becoming mayor, Schmoke was the city state's attorney. But in 1965, he was a 15-year-old quarterback when the football season at his alma mater, City College, began in September.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | October 23, 2006
The pumpkin patch that the Rev. Roger Scott Powers and his fellow congregants built doesn't offer hayrides. It has no view of rolling pastures or grazing cows, no corn maze, no quaint country shop selling jams made from fresh berries grown on the farm next door. Instead, visitors will likely hear the roar of ambulances, the lurch of city buses stopping nearby and the click-click of fashionable heels hitting the well-traveled sidewalk. There is a lovely view, but it's of 19th-century townhouses.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
As the fog lifted yesterday morning, so up came all sorts of trash from neighborhoods across Baltimore as part of the fifth fall citywide cleanup drive. In 177 city neighborhoods, more than 3,000 volunteers took part in the event, which focused on reducing the backlog of 5,000 vacant housing yards covered in debris. "Government doesn't make the trash, so we got a job to do," Mayor Martin O'Malley said behind a row of buildings on the 2000 block of Edmondson Ave. He was joined by a small army of helpers wearing rubber-coated yellow gloves who trimmed back trees and weeds, raked up leaves and broken glass and swept walkways.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
As the fog lifted yesterday morning, so up came all sorts of trash from neighborhoods across Baltimore as part of the fifth fall citywide cleanup drive. In 177 city neighborhoods, more than 3,000 volunteers took part in the event, which focused on reducing the backlog of 5,000 vacant housing yards covered in debris. "Government doesn't make the trash, so we got a job to do," Mayor Martin O'Malley said behind a row of buildings on the 2000 block of Edmondson Ave. He was joined by a small army of helpers wearing rubber-coated yellow gloves who trimmed back trees and weeds, raked up leaves and broken glass and swept walkways.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1999
Dropping a legal bomb on a small Southwest Baltimore area long accustomed to explosions, a state appeals court has cleared the way for residents to sue a scrap metal yard -- and possibly shifted the balance of power in disputes between communities and their industrial neighbors.The Court of Special Appeals decision, filed Friday by Judge Andrew Sonner, was hailed in tiny Mill Hill, where residents have complained for three decades of explosions, dust, and soot from neighboring United Iron & Metal Co.As word of the decision spread across the city, lawyers and community activists involved in environmental disputes -- from a West Baltimore landfill to a Wagner's Point chemical company -- scrambled for copies.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1999
Dropping a legal bomb on a small Southwest Baltimore area long accustomed to explosions, a state appeals court has cleared the way for residents to sue a scrap metal yard -- and possibly shifted the balance of power in disputes between communities and their industrial neighbors.The Court of Special Appeals decision, filed Friday by Judge Andrew Sonner, was hailed in tiny Mill Hill, where residents have complained for three decades of explosions, dust, and soot from neighboring United Iron & Metal Co.As word of the decision spread across the city, lawyers and community activists involved in environmental disputes -- from a West Baltimore landfill to a Wagner's Point chemical company -- scrambled for copies.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | May 11, 1992
A pilot flying in the weather-delayed Preakness Week annual hot-air balloon race was injured yesterday when his craft hit a tree and landed in the back yard of a Northeast Baltimore home.Rich Schroeder, of Lancaster, Pa., suffered a fractured vertebra. He was treated at Good Samaritan Hospital and later transferred to Lancaster General Hospital, where he was listed in satisfactory condition last night. His wife, Sharon, said he is scheduled to be released tomorrow . "He should be OK," she said.
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