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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Brenda J. Clayburn, a founder and later president of the City Union of Baltimore who was also a longtime city Police Department supervisor, died Sunday of undetermined causes at her Northwest Baltimore home. She was 63. "She had recently been sick, and we are waiting the results of an autopsy," said her daughter, Shirley Y. Cooper, who lives in Baltimore. "I was very saddened to learn of the passing of Brenda Clayburn. Brenda was a strong advocate for the thousands of city employees she represented, and she cared deeply for their welfare," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement Monday.
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NEWS
August 13, 2014
Baltimore's Police and Fire unions pay more into their pension fund than any other city unions. When the city enacted legislation to basically freeze cost of living raises for fire and police until the age of 55 with a paltry 1 percent raise, then 2 percent at 62, it was not only age discrimination but breech of contract. They even froze cost of living increases for fire and police injured in the line of duty. What is so shameful about the whole thing is that the politicians still managed to fully fund their pension system while still giving daily cost of living increases to retired politicians.
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NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2003
The city's two largest unions set aside their collective differences with Mayor Martin O'Malley's administration and approved new contracts this week that provide pay raises to offset increases in health care costs. The City Union of Baltimore, whose members ratified the two-year deal Tuesday, signed the agreement yesterday. The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Local 44 approved an identical agreement Sunday and signed it Tuesday. The Board of Estimates is scheduled to formally approve the agreements Wednesday, ending a contentious negotiating season for the city with its five unions.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake defended her decision to require nonessential Baltimore employees to travel to work Thursday or stay home and use vacation time, saying residents need services in severe weather. Union representatives said the decision to allow "liberal leave" - but not to shut down city offices - was inconsistent with Gov. Martin O'Malley's call for Marylanders to stay home during the storm. They said they hoped the mayor would remember the workers' commitment when it came time to finalize their contracts.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | February 27, 1991
In what may be a significant victory for Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, workers in the 5,300-member City Union of Baltimore voted overwhelmingly last night to allow their leaders to negotiate a deferral of a 6 percent raise the union won in bargaining only a year ago.Six hundred union members, who packed the auditorium of the Harford Heights Elementary School for an emergency meeting last night, said in a voice vote that they were convinced themayor would make...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2001
Sheila Jordan, president of a city employees' labor union, died of cancer Saturday at her Catonsville home -- one day after she was elected to a third term in the job. Mrs. Jordan, 49, was unopposed in the City Union of Baltimore election. She had been president of the union representing about 5,000 municipal workers since 1997. "I had a great deal of respect for her," Mayor Martin O'Malley said yesterday. "She was a strong advocate for her members and was always decent. She made her points in a pleasant, forthright, straight-up sort of way. She never resorted to personal attacks.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | November 19, 1994
Almost all of Baltimore's 26,294 municipal workers will receive back pay they sacrificed in a 1992 "wage furlough," according to a settlement announced yesterday between the city and three unions.The city agreed to repay a little more than half of the 2 1/2 days of pay that was withheld as a money-saving measure to cope with $40 million in state budget cuts.For a city schoolteacher who earns about $30,000, that would mean $180, said Linda Prudente, spokeswoman for the Baltimore Teachers Union, which represents about 8,500 teachers.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2005
Baltimore's lowest-paid government workers will receive 4 percent annual pay raises under three-year contracts reached with Mayor Martin O'Malley that will likely ensure the mayor avoids labor unrest in the city as he runs for governor next year. The contracts with the City Union of Baltimore and AFSCME Local 44 complete the administration's goal of signing long-term deals with all of its bargaining unions, including the units representing police officers, firefighters and fire officers.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1996
Teachers and school aides ended yesterday their work-to-rule protest against the Baltimore school system's on-again, off-again plan to dock employees 10 days of pay to balance the budget.Participation in the three-day Baltimore Teachers Union job action was mixed, in part because of confusion caused by city officials' contradictory announcements earlier in the week. In addition, some union members declined to boycott after-school student activities that they had pledged to organize or attend.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | May 4, 1991
Although Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is depending on a wage freeze for municipal employees to balance the upcoming budget, none of the city unions has yet formally agreed to give up their negotiated pay raises and one is even planning a lawsuit to protect a raise awarded to its members by an arbitrator."
NEWS
December 3, 2013
While other Baltimore City retirees and politicians continue to receive cost of living raises, Baltimore's police officers and firefighters have had their pensions frozen for almost seven years ("Baltimore's top elected officials set to receive automatic raise," Nov. 27). Can you imagine: Police officers and firefighters who have been injured in the line of duty have received nothing for almost seven years now, unless they are 55 years old. At 55 they would get a paltry 1 percent.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
Baltimore's top politicians are set to receive automatic 2.5 percent pay raises, following a years-old decision by an independent body. The salary hikes — which would increase the mayor's $159,380 salary to $163,365 — are tied to raises that city union workers receive each year, according to a 2010 decision by the Compensation Commission for Elected Officials. The cost-of-living increases would take effect in January following a legal vetting by the Board of Estimates on Wednesday.
NEWS
August 6, 2013
Auditing employee health insurance rolls to make sure everyone receiving benefits as a dependent is entitled to them is exactly the kind of thing Baltimore needs to do if it is to have any chance of controlling the cost of government, cutting taxes and making city living more attractive. The fact that the effort has caught some employees so completely off guard - some reportedly had no idea this was going on until they sought to fill prescriptions for children or spouses and found themselves without coverage - shows just how lax management has been up to this point and how far the city has to go before it is running a truly efficient operation.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | July 9, 2013
The Baltimore City school board on Tuesday approved the hiring of a prominent, Iowa-based firm to conduct a national search for a permanent CEO to lead Baltimore schools. Ray and Associates Inc., which has helped fill executive seats in school districts across the state, won a $46,800 competitively bid contract, according to school officials. The contract will begin Wednesday and last through July 9, 2014. The firm was most recently tapped to conduct the superintendent search in Howard County and has conducted searches for Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
Baltimore fire union president Rick Hoffman blasted the city administration Tuesday for not giving firefighters the 2 percent raises all other city union employees will get, after months of staying silent on the issue amid ongoing arbitration. Hoffman made note of the city's recent violent crime wave as evidence that firefighters deserve a raise, saying that members of the Fire Department, who also handle medical calls, are the ones who take shooting victims to the hospital and wash the blood off the street after the police leave.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Brenda J. Clayburn, a founder and later president of the City Union of Baltimore who was also a longtime city Police Department supervisor, died Sunday of undetermined causes at her Northwest Baltimore home. She was 63. "She had recently been sick, and we are waiting the results of an autopsy," said her daughter, Shirley Y. Cooper, who lives in Baltimore. "I was very saddened to learn of the passing of Brenda Clayburn. Brenda was a strong advocate for the thousands of city employees she represented, and she cared deeply for their welfare," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement Monday.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2010
Baltimore's top elected officials will continue to receive annual pay increases tied to raises for city union members, following an independent board's decision Monday morning. Salaries for the mayor, comptroller, City Council president and other council members will increase by 2.5 percent for each of the next four years, provided at least one union group receives a raise. Morton P. Fisher Jr., chairman of the elected officials' compensation commission and an attorney with Ballard Spahr, said the seven-member board decided to maintain the same system of raises established in 2006.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | February 14, 1992
Two of Baltimore's largest municipal labor unions joined yesterday in suing city government to block Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's plans that would cut their members' pay by five days.The suit, filed in U.S. District Court, also challenges the so-called "Neall amendment," a one-year provision added to state law last fall that broadens the power of local governments to invade labor contracts to reduce spending. The suit calls the provisionunconstitutional.The suit was filed by the City Union of Baltimore and the Baltimore Teachers Union, which together represent 15,000 employees -- more than half the city's 26,600-person work force.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
Patricia Cook-Ferguson, a longtime Baltimore teacher and president of the Baltimore County NAACP known for wearing multiple hats in advocating for youth education and civil rights advancements, died Wednesday of complications from lung cancer. She was 56. "She was the heart and soul of our chapter," said Tony Fugett, who as first vice president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People chapter will assume Mrs. Cook-Ferguson's responsibilities. Mrs. Cook-Ferguson had been ill for about a year, and was hospitalized about three weeks ago at Northwest Hospital, where she died in hospice care, said her son, Carlton Ferguson Jr. The NAACP chapter described Mrs. Cook-Ferguson as an "ardent supporter of civil rights and equal justice," and she was lauded as a leader in the Baltimore Teachers Union and the American Federation of Teachers in Maryland, where she had held multiple positions.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Members of the Baltimore school police union cast a vote of "no confidence" in their police chief last month, pointing to what they said was his lack of responsiveness to their concerns, union leaders announced Thursday. In a letter addressed to city schools CEO Andrés Alonso, Sgt. Clyde E. Boatwright, president of the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 5, said that between Oct. 14 and Oct. 21, 84 of 110 officers cast a vote of "no confidence" in Chief Marshall "Toby" Goodwin's ability to run the school system's police department.
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