Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCity That Reads
IN THE NEWS

City That Reads

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 15, 1996
BALTIMORE CATCHES a lot of grief for the motto Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke chose for it, "the city that reads." It seems a joke when one considers problems within the public schools.But Baltimore does have an important literary history and one of the finest public libraries in the nation in the Enoch Pratt. It is therefore appropriate that the city celebrate its first Baltimore Book Festival, Sept. 28-29, at Mount Vernon Place. Indeed, one wonders why it hasn't done so before now.The outdoor event will include storytelling, poetry readings, children's activities, author signings, literary walking tours, book selling, displays by publishing companies, bookbinding demonstrations, live music and a cafe.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
The adult literacy nonprofit Baltimore Reads Inc. announced Friday it would cease operations June 30 because of funding problems. Founded in 1988 by then-Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke as part of the "City That Reads" campaign, the organization said it had helped more than 10,000 people learn to read when it celebrated its 25th anniversary last year. It also has taught English as a second language and GED preparation classes. The group lists a staff of 14 on its web site. "This was not a decision made lightly, or without regard to its impact on the community which BRI has served for over 26 years," said Clare Miller, President of Baltimore Reads, Inc. As funding became harder to raise, the group's board sought a partner, without success.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Dan Berger | April 3, 1996
The City that Reads will have the first football team in history that was named for a poem.Yeltsin ordered a cease-fire. The Chechens didn't.When politicians fight over the schools, regardless of who wins, the kids lose, every time.If all the Baby Bells are going to merge, why did the courts go to the trouble of creating them?Pub Date: 4/03/96
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 4, 2013
Some time within the past week, 160,000 new books arrived in The City That Reads, a term I've neither heard nor uttered since the Kurt Schmoke mayoralty and its much-mocked motto ("The City That Bleeds," "The City That Breeds") faded into memory nearly 15 years ago. But, it's true: One hundred and sixty thousand children's books are being distributed free to Baltimore schoolteachers this week, and they, in turn, will distribute them to their students, most of whom are from low-income families lacking extensive libraries at home.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | October 18, 1990
And so, on his very first day in office, the new mayor said: "It A would make me proudest if one day it simply could be said of = Baltimore that this is the city that reads.", The city that reads . . .Last year, more than 5,400 adults participated in one of several new adult-literacy centers in the city.An unprecedented 158,000 new people signed up for a library card. Library officials say more people checked out books, last year. More people consulted reference materials. More people called the library's information hot line for help.
NEWS
May 10, 2001
With a new slogan, "The Greatest City in America" on its bus benches, Baltimore has abandoned former Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's motto, "The City That Reads." What slogan would you suggest for the city? We are looking for 300 words or fewer; the deadline is May 21. Letters become the property of The Sun, which reserves the right to edit them. By submitting a letter, the author grants The Sun an irrevocable, non-exclusive right and license to use and republish the letter, in whole or in part, in all media and to authorize others to reprint it. Letters should include your name and address, along with a day and evening telephone number.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 1, 1996
"Catch the Spirit" is Baltimore's new slogan, not to be confused with its motto, "The City that Reads," which is printed on city-owned vehicles, said mayoral spokesman Clinton R. Coleman.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke used the phrase in his inaugural address in December to help boost the morale of city residents, the spokesman said.A large banner recently was attached to the south side of a vacant Lexington Terrace housing complex building that is to be imploded next month, reading: "Catch the Spirit Baltimore With Mayor Schmoke and Commissioner Henson."
NEWS
September 8, 1993
From time to time, Other Voices returns to that body of financial acumen and rhetorical excellence, the Baltimore City Board of Estimates. Following is an excerpt from the minutes of the board's June 30 meeting. This portion follows a lengthy discussion of the management of the Baltimore Arena.President Mary Pat Clarke: The Board of Estimates is pleased to acknowledge the presence here today of the YMCA Day Camp, and we welcome you. This is the Board of Estimates. We come here every week to spend your mommy's and daddy's money.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | September 30, 1996
I WENT TO the book festival Saturday because I'm a book junkie and because it seemed like a good idea, at least until it started to rain.If you don't think about it too hard, a book festival downtown makes perfect sense. Baltimore, a city that lives to do fairs, was looking for a new excuse to bring people into the city.And Baltimore is, as we all know, the city that reads.We all know this because we've all seen the slogan on the backs of park benches and, occasionally, on the sides of slow-moving city buses.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch | November 4, 1997
As the finale to Baltimore's 200th anniversary celebration this year, the city will bury a time capsule at the Inner Harbor on Dec. 31. The capsule, a steel box about the size of a microwave oven, is to be opened in 2097.The question is, what to put into it? For months the city has been accepting suggestions through forms included with city water bills and via its Web site -- http: //www.bicentennial.com. Suggestions are welcome until the end of the business day today.Folks have suggested such things as an episode of "Homicide," an MTA bus pass and a letter from Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to the Baltimore mayor of 2097.
NEWS
January 16, 2007
THE PROBLEM -- There's an urban legend that years ago a Baltimore police officer once dragged a dead horse off Auchentoroly Terrace because he couldn't spell the name of the street for his report. He moved the carcass to a street with a simpler name and listed that site instead. At least he cared that he got it right for his report. Government officials of today can't always spell Charles Street correctly, and someone somewhere decided that the lane called "Cold Spring" should be compacted into one word.
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2002
If you live in White Plains, N.Y., you should be at least halfway through The Pearl, by John Steinbeck. In Georgia, it's time to finish up Janisse Ray's Ecology of a Cracker Childhood. Canadian residents? You're supposed to be reading In the Skin of a Lion, unless you live in Vancouver, in which case you should also be reading The Jade Peony. If the idea of your local, state or federal government guiding your choice of reading seems far-fetched - sort of the reverse of Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, which residents of Lafayette, Ind., were advised to start this month - look again.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2002
Baltimore really will be "the city that reads" one day in September, when volunteers pore over novels and newspapers, menus and magazines in a 24-hour readathon intended to address the city's dismal literacy rate. At 100 locations across the city, volunteers will read aloud in one-hour shifts around the clock, starting at 6:30 a.m. Sept. 26. The event, called Need-to-Read, is meant to raise awareness about illiteracy and raise funds to address the problem. Thirty-eight percent of the city's adults are functionally illiterate, meaning they read at or below the sixth-grade level, said Marlene McLaurin, chief executive officer of Baltimore Reads, a literacy group that is organizing the event.
NEWS
May 10, 2001
With a new slogan, "The Greatest City in America" on its bus benches, Baltimore has abandoned former Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's motto, "The City That Reads." What slogan would you suggest for the city? We are looking for 300 words or fewer; the deadline is May 21. Letters become the property of The Sun, which reserves the right to edit them. By submitting a letter, the author grants The Sun an irrevocable, non-exclusive right and license to use and republish the letter, in whole or in part, in all media and to authorize others to reprint it. Letters should include your name and address, along with a day and evening telephone number.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2001
Baltimore recorded fewer than 300 homicides last year for the first time in more than a decade, curbing a vicious cycle of killings that stained the city as one of the nation's most violent urban centers. The year ended yesterday with 262 homicides, well below the 305 in 1999. That broke a barrier that seemed impossible in April, when the number of killings exceeded the previous year's pace by nearly three dozen. "It's a tremendous morale boost to the Police Department," said Commissioner Edward T. Norris.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2000
Close the book on "The City That Reads." Welcome to "The Greatest City in America." A year after being elected, Mayor Martin O'Malley has changed Baltimore's official slogan. The new tag replaces the phrase established 13 years ago by O'Malley's Rhodes Scholar predecessor, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, to replace William Donald Schaefer's "Baltimore Is Best." O'Malley has been quietly testing his new mantra, placing it on the city Web site and hanging a sign outside his office. But the mayor made the phrase - which he used to close his campaign speeches and inauguration address - official when workers stenciled it on a bus stop bench at St. Paul and Saratoga streets this week.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 15, 1991
"Rebuilt a branch library system badly in need of repair. Nine libraries have been renovated and reopened under Mayor Schmoke, and two more are being renovated now."-- From "The Major Accomplishments of Kurt L. Schmoke as Mayor of Baltimore City," his 1991 campaign brochureWell, it was good while it lasted -- "The City That Reads" bit, I mean."It would make me proudest," Schmoke said in his 1987 inauguration speech, "if one day it could simply be said . . . this is The City That Reads."It was a great notion, something Schmoke held sacred.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | August 30, 1991
Perhaps you've been reading where the Orioles and the city are renegotiating the lease at Memorial Stadium, and you find it confusing. Me, too. Which is why I put on my reporter's hat (it's the one with that little press card sticking out) and came up with the minutes to a recent negotiating session. I'll share them with you.Orioles: We'd like to pay less rent at Memorial Stadium.Baltimore: Fine.Orioles: No, I said less rent.Baltimore: Fine.Orioles: Wait, I don't think you get it. We've got an ironclad contract with you folks, and we want you to tear it up so we don't have to pay you millions of dollars, even though we're leaving the stadium in about a month and we won't even say thanks.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch | November 4, 1997
As the finale to Baltimore's 200th anniversary celebration this year, the city will bury a time capsule at the Inner Harbor on Dec. 31. The capsule, a steel box about the size of a microwave oven, is to be opened in 2097.The question is, what to put into it? For months the city has been accepting suggestions through forms included with city water bills and via its Web site -- http: //www.bicentennial.com. Suggestions are welcome until the end of the business day today.Folks have suggested such things as an episode of "Homicide," an MTA bus pass and a letter from Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to the Baltimore mayor of 2097.
NEWS
By Fred B. Shoken | July 25, 1997
BALTIMORE: The City That Reads.That's what it says on all those city trucks, cars, benches, tax bills, etc.And there's that guy in the Yellow Diamond cab with his book opened. Did you ever wonder what he's reading and why he's still on the same page? But a more important question for city residents is: Where did he buy that book in the first place?Baltimore, the city that reads, isn't a very good place to buy books.Yes, there are some great places to buy used books: Tiber and Kelmscott on 25th Street and Allen's and Normal's on 31st Street.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.