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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | April 25, 2012
The Sun's Mary Gail Hare reports this morning more violence: Two shootings in the city Tuesday have left one man dead and another critically wounded. A 22-year-old man was shot multiple times in the torso shortly before 6 p.m. in the 4800 block of Northwood Drive near Winston Avenue in Govans. Police said the victim was approached on the street by an unidentified man who fired at him with a handgun. The victim remains in serious condition at an area hospital.   At 10:05 p.m., officers responded to a report of a shooting in the 4100 block of Norfolk Ave. in the Forest Park area.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Charlie Duff | July 16, 2014
The reactions triggered by the Board of Estimates' recent approval of a study of the feasibility of converting St. Paul and Calvert streets back to two-way traffic have demonstrated that this city is at a crossroads. Policies are changing and new ideas are emerging, yet there is still a significant obstacle ahead of us: challenging outdated mentalities. Forty years of car-centric urban planning have turned Baltimore into one of the most congested areas in the country, but some still argue that solutions lie in rush-hour parking restrictions and signal optimization.
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NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
Motorists should to avoid the following areas because of high water, according to the Baltimore Transportation Department. Both directions of Hilton Parkway, from Edmondson Avenue to North Avenue; Patapsco Avenue, from Potee Street to Annapolis Road; Franklintown Road, from Ellamont Street to North Forest Park Avenue; Portions of Harford Road; and eastbound Erdman Avenue at Pulaski Highway. The Baltimore City Department of Transportation advises motorists to drive with caution and allow additional travel time.
NEWS
July 16, 2014
So I come to find out today that in a stroke of brilliance, our fine city of Baltimore has decided that in an effort to stop criminals from breaking into the cars and vans of people with disability placards, they will completely eliminate the free parking privilege for all the disabled ( "New rules require disabled drivers to pay for handicap spots," July 10). You see, up until July 10th, people with disabilities who had a placard could park at a meter within the city for free.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
I read with interest Amanda Yeager's Oct. 17 article about pedestrians being a priority in historic Ellicott City plans. It was a very comprehensive article about the county planning to spend $3 million in improvements for better/safer pedestrian travel. I applaud these improvements because our children and grandkids spend a lot of time in our historic city shopping and having dinner. It is hard for folks to walk and get across Main Street. We applaud the new benches and raised (hopefully ped-activated lighted)
NEWS
By John Fritze | April 3, 2008
Baltimore plans to resurface 200 lane-miles in the city this year -- a slight increase over last year and more than double what was paved in 2006 -- under a goal set by Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration yesterday. Standing on a newly resurfaced Ashton Street in Southwest Baltimore, transportation officials said portions of Russell Street, Erdman Avenue, Belair Road and other city streets are in line for improvements this year. "When we invest in our streets and the infrastructure of our city, it really makes a difference in how we perceive our communities," Dixon said.
NEWS
May 12, 2005
City transportation officials are planning a variety of parking restrictions and road closures, starting tonight, in anticipation of Saturdays WHFS Festival at the M&T Bank Stadium. From midnight until midnight Sunday, the northbound and southbound Russell Street service drive will be closed from West Street to Ostend Street. From 7 a.m. until midnight Saturday, Camden Street will be closed from Howard Street to Russell Street, and Eutaw Street will be closed from Camden Street to Pratt Street.
NEWS
November 20, 2007
THE PROBLEM -- Large trucks use Bonaparte Avenue in East Baltimore even though doing so is prohibited. THE BACKSTORY -- Bonaparte Avenue is a residential street that runs through the East Baltimore-Midway neighborhood. Truck drivers seem to like it as a convenient shortcut to industries at the eastern edge of the city, ignoring signs that bar them from using the road. "The trucks are shaking our houses and knocking our pictures off the walls," said John D. Brown, who has lived on Bonaparte for 21 years.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch | April 5, 2001
Let's see now, one could put a halo above its head and call it an an- gelfish, or apply a big red nose and call it a clownfish or, say, a line of Highlandtown rowhouses for a fishrow - the mind fairly reels with possibilities. And if you think that's a regrettable pun, you ain't seen nothin' yet. Baltimore is about to follow in the wake of Cincinnati's pigs and Buffalo's buffalo and Orlando's lizards, all of which trailed Chicago's cows, a fund-raising sidewalk art project that put hundreds of Holsteins and other varieties on the streets.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2010
It's the signature program for Baltimore police — curtail violence by getting guns off city streets. The department's public Twitter feed is replete with gun arrests — "traffic stop leads to 1 arrest and recovery of a .40 cal handgun" — reads one note from Monday. "Call for armed person leads to recovery of a .38 caliber handgun," reads another message from Thursday. But it seems that just as often as guns are taken out of circulation, bullets fired from guns are put into circulation.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 16, 2014
A note about Jeff Yeatman: I sought him out; he did not contact me. Until I asked, he'd never given an interview about the random act of madness that occurred 15 years ago near his office in downtown Baltimore. "I actively avoided it at the time," he says, "because I resented the idea that I had to share something very fresh and awful just because other people found it interesting. " I came across his name while searching Google for articles about walking to work. This headline, from The Baltimore Sun of Feb. 3, 1999, popped up: "Lawyer wounded walking to work.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
City officials this weekend dedicated a portion of Jefferson Street in East Baltimore to honor Troy Douglas - an 8-year-old boy who was killed following a gas explosion in February. His family spent Sunday afternoon singing "Happy Birthday" at his graveside at King Memorial Park. He would have been 9. "He was a regular, 8-year-old kid," his mother, Shanika Brown, said. "His life got taken from him. It wasn't his fault. " Brown and Troy's father, also named Troy Douglas, are separated, but they and a dozen other relatives gathered at Brown's McElderry Park home after visiting the cemetery.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | April 14, 2014
Two very different perspectives on urban life are on view in the exhibit "The City: Paintings by Robert Tennenbaum and Linda Press" at Howard Community College's Rouse Company Foundation Gallery. Tennenbaum's aerial views of various cities are from so high up in the sky that it's way beyond where birds fly and closer to what a satellite would photograph. The precise height does not really matter, though, because these are highly schematic depictions that abstractly treat a city's layout in terms of blue lines for rivers, a black-lined grid for city streets, and patches of green for parks.
FEATURES
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
Street sweeping in Baltimore will expand citywide on Wednesdays beginning in April to stop tons of trash, grime and pollutants from ending up in the Chesapeake Bay. Drivers are asked to move their vehicles on designated days to make room for the mechanical sweeping. The city's Northwest and Southeast portions will be swept on the first and second Wednesday of the month. The streets in front of houses and businesses with odd numbers will be swept on the first Wednesday and the even-numbered side will be swept on the second Wednesday.
NEWS
January 24, 2014
If Washington, D.C., and Montgomery County residents and business are content with taxes on shopping bags, that's fine ( "Bag tax economics," Jan. 23). This is Baltimore. I believe residents and businesses should have a say about the 10-cent a bag charge. To enact this law without input from voters would be taxation without representation (and we know what that led to). When Baltimore citizens are gunned down on city streets, our mayor and City Council should have more on their minds than shopping bags.
NEWS
January 24, 2014
I encourage the members of the Baltimore City Council to pass the bag tax measure ( "Bag tax economics," Jan. 23). When this measure was proposed several years ago, we heard the same argument that it penalized the economically disadvantaged. This argument reminds me of the complaints when the city went from collecting trash twice a week to collecting recycling one day per week and trash on only one day. There were dire forecasts that people would have too much trash to be able to wait all week before putting it out. It completely ignored that the change in the city's policy would require a corresponding change in the behavior of the city's population.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | October 29, 2006
The river port that welcomed presidents, generals and occasional gangsters is offering 21st- century visitors a walk through its history. Havre de Grace, which overlooks the confluence of the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay, has lined up guides well-versed in local lore for its first-ever Haunted History and Ghost Walk Tour. "Don't take any spirits home with you," Mike Salmon cautioned a group of about 20 taking the mile walk through city streets on a brisk fall evening. As they set off from a tavern on Washington Street, a ghoulish character whispered, "I hope everyone makes it back all right."
FEATURES
By Andrea F. Siegel and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 16, 2010
Annapolis residents may park for free in the city's garages until Thursday morning, city officials said Tuesday. With public works crews continuing to work to widen the passable lines on city streets, vehicles parked on snow emergency routes may be towed, they said. The free parking at the three downtown garages, which has been in effect for about a week, will end at 8 a.m. Thursday, police spokesman Ray Weaver said. City spokesman Phill McGowan said officials believe that all city streets were passably by the width of at least one car by Tuesday.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
I read with interest Amanda Yeager's Oct. 17 article about pedestrians being a priority in historic Ellicott City plans. It was a very comprehensive article about the county planning to spend $3 million in improvements for better/safer pedestrian travel. I applaud these improvements because our children and grandkids spend a lot of time in our historic city shopping and having dinner. It is hard for folks to walk and get across Main Street. We applaud the new benches and raised (hopefully ped-activated lighted)
NEWS
By Michele Bickley | September 9, 2013
It started two years ago this weekend. I was pregnant with our second baby, and we wanted to be closer to family and away from big-city madness. So, after 13 years in Los Angeles, we packed up a pod, our two-year-old daughter and cat, and moved clear across the country to Ellicott City. We bought a historic stone home on Main Street beside a gentle stream and farmette complete with sheep, chickens and ducks. We could walk to the quaint town with its wine bar, restaurants, shops and great music scene.
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