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By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
Benjamin L. Brown, former District Court judge and city solicitor who served for 13 years as Baltimore's chief legal counsel during the administration of William Donald Schaefer, died of cancer yesterday at Keswick Multi-Care Center in Roland Park. He was 72 and lived in Mount Washington. "He was an institution, and we're going to miss him," said Mayor Martin O'Malley. "He was a total gentleman who cared deeply about the city and brought a tremendous amount of knowledge to his work." In 1999, Mr. O'Malley appointed Mr. Brown to the transition team for the Baltimore solicitor's office.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Baltimore is set to pay $250,000 to a man who says police seized his cellphone and deleted the video of an arrest at the Preakness Stakes in 2010, according a settlement proposal that will be presented to the city's spending panel this month. Police "vigorously" dispute the allegations by Christopher Sharp who claimed officers violated his First and Fourth Amendment rights when they took his phone after the arrest of his female friend at Pimlico Race Course . But the city lawyers said in the two-page document that because of "factual disputes," a settlement will help the city "to resolve this litigation economically and to avoid the expense, time and uncertainties" of a potential jury verdict.
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NEWS
By DOUG DONOVAN and DOUG DONOVAN,SUN REPORTER | April 19, 2006
Baltimore's top lawyer recommended yesterday against suing lead-paint manufacturers for damages their products have caused city residents. City Solicitor Ralph Tyler expressed his opinion at a City Council committee hearing for a resolution asking his advice on the possibility of success for such a lawsuit. "It is our view that litigation against [lead-paint] manufacturers is not likely to be successful," Tyler told council members Mary Pat Clarke, Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. and Belinda Conaway.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
In the courtroom where Baltimore Circuit Judge Timothy J. Doory metes out justice, he has a steadfast if silent companion, Maj. German H.H. Emory, a lawyer killed in World War I whose portrait hangs to the right of his bench. "He's looking at me every day," Doory said, "so we have a relationship. " But it wasn't until this summer that, by accident of jury duty, Emory's relations would come face to face with his portrait. The mix of happenstance and history so delighted Doory that he hosted a gathering in his courtroom Friday to toast Emory on the 95th anniversary of his battlefield death.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun Reporter | January 9, 2007
George A. Nilson, a former Maryland deputy attorney general who has litigated a number of high-profile cases, will become city solicitor for incoming Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon - securing one of the fledgling administration's most important Cabinet positions. Nilson, 64, worked in the state attorney general's office for nine years, leaving the department as deputy attorney general in 1982 to return to private practice. He is currently an attorney with DLA Piper, where he has focused on public and consumer law. "I have been interested in returning to the public sector for a while," said Nilson, whose appointment will take effect Jan. 17. "This seems like a natural position for me personally."
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
Baltimore's law office is under fire for a proposal to hire the former chief lawyer for the police department, despite criticism that his office unfairly targeted black officers for discipline.City Solicitor Otho Thompson asked the Board of Estimates Wednesday to approve a one-year contract with Gary C. May, whom the law office wants to hire as the chief solicitor who would be assigned to the litigation division."We have a need for experienced lawyers," Thompson told city officials before the estimates board's public meeting.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1996
City Solicitor Neal M. Janey is leaving next month to return to private law practice after serving more than eight years for Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.He will join the law firm of Miles & Stockbridge as co-manager of its government relations practice with O. James Lighthizer. The former Anne Arundel County executive and state transportation secretary also is joining the firm.Janey's departure comes more than a year after he first announced he was leaving his job as top City Hall lawyer. He changed his mind after Schmoke persuaded him to stay for the transition into his third mayoral term.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1995
Neal M. Janey, the cautious and deliberate top lawyer for Baltimore, is leaving after nearly eight years on the job to return to private practice with the prestigious Miles & Stockbridge law firm.One of the first members of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's Cabinet, the city solicitor earned a reputation for thoroughness in his legal work and firmness in his post on the Board of Estimates, the panel that reviews almost every aspect of city business.As the solicitor, Mr. Janey directed an office that grew from 63 lawyers to 78 and oversaw more municipal legal work being contracted out to private firms.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and JoAnna Daemmrich and Eric Siegel and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writers | July 6, 1995
Maryland's attorney general, responding to Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's refusal to reveal all legal fees paid to the politically connected law firm of Shapiro and Olander, said yesterday the payments from quasi-public agencies should be subject to state public disclosure laws.Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said agencies created or controlled by the mayor should come under the requirements of the Maryland Public Information Act.His views were echoed by a parade of politicians -- including the leading candidates for city comptroller -- who have called for a complete accounting of the Shapiro and Olander fees.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and Eric Siegel and JoAnna Daemmrich and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writers | July 9, 1994
Paving the way for the immediate retirement of Baltimore Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean, the city's top legal officer has ruled that she is entitled to receive benefits while awaiting her corruption trial.City Solicitor Neal M. Janey determined yesterday that there is no legal basis for withholding Mrs. McLean's pension unless she is convicted of a crime committed in office.The pension board should meet as quickly as possible to approve the comptroller's request to retire with full benefits, Mr. Janey wrote in a 30-page opinion.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
A longtime minority contracting advocate has filed a lawsuit against Baltimore and the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation, alleging the creation of a new baseball field in Park Heights is bypassing competitive bidding requirements. In the lawsuit filed in Baltimore Circuit Court, Arnold M. Jolivet alleges the city violated the law when awarding the $2 million project to develop a youth ballpark near Pimlico Race Course . "Mayor Rawlings‐Blake and the Board of Estimates simply voted to award the contract to the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation, Inc., completely without seeking any competitive bids from other interested and qualified bidders," Jolivet's lawsuit states.
NEWS
June 5, 2013
The City Council's decision this week to unanimously approve a bill requiring businesses getting large city contracts to hire 51 percent of new workers from Baltimore was regrettable not only because the measure probably won't have much impact on the worthy goal of reducing city unemployment, but because it may be illegal as well. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's decision to let it go into law without her signature, despite the advice of City Solicitor George Nilson that it is almost certainly unconstitutional, is shameful.
NEWS
May 28, 2013
I want to both honor and condemn The Sun for its coverage of an issue that the average city citizen feels both perplexed and confused about. It's difficult for people to understand how they can be taxed with a Stormwater Utility Fee buried among 20 ballot questions in last year's election and then turn around and be hit with a proposed "rain tax" and a subsequent 15 percent increase proposed by the city's Department of Public Works ("Baltimore water...
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
The city of Baltimore agreed Wednesday to pay $100,000 to a West Baltimore family whose special-needs student died after falling from a moving school bus in 2010. City Solicitor George Nilson said school officials knew that Jeremy C. Jennings Jr., the emotionally disturbed 6-year-old, needed to be restrained on the bus but failed to do so. "A young, vulnerable child was sent off to school and didn't return home through no fault of his own," said Nilson, a member of the city Board of Estimates.
NEWS
October 15, 2012
Every day that passes without the Baltimore City government installing a Voice over Internet Protocol phone system, the taxpayers waste thousands of dollars. About this fact there is no dispute. The city's old phone system is wasteful and inefficient, and at a time when Baltimore is closing recreation centers and fire companies, there is no excuse for not moving forward with an investment that will serve taxpayers better at a lower cost. Both Comptroller Joan Pratt and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake share the blame in the pettiness and subterfuge that have torpedoed efforts to make the transition to VoIP.
NEWS
August 16, 2012
It was with disgust that I read the comments of the city solicitor, George Nilson, that you published in on August 7 ("City panel plans to vote down settlement for teen whom police left shoeless in Howard Co. ") regarding the rejection of a police misconduct settlement. The city's highest law officer stated in open court something that many of us knew all along - that the Board of Estimates is simply a rubber stamp for the mayor of Baltimore because majority of this Board (three out of five members)
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 10, 2004
Mayor Martin O'Malley's choice for city solicitor discussed his decades of experience as a private and government attorney at a hearing last night before the City Council's Executive Appointments Committee, which is expected to recommend his confirmation to the full council Monday. Ralph S. Tyler also recalled the hot summer he spent in Mississippi as a 19-year-old civil rights demonstrator. Tyler said he walked several hundred miles as part of a march organized in 1966 by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Tyler, 57, a partner in the law firm Hogan and Hartson, said he was a legal-services lawyer early in his career and has continued to do much pro bono work on behalf of prisoners.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
Baltimore Mayor-elect Martin O'Malley announced his first Cabinet picks yesterday, selecting his city solicitor and finance director, but will likely be inaugurated Tuesday without having filled several key posts.O'Malley chose Thurman Zollicoffer, a white-collar criminal defense lawyer, as the city's top attorney. O'Malley selected Peggy J. Watson, a former deputy director in the city Finance Department, as his finance director.Zollicoffer, 37, a lifelong Baltimore resident, worked with O'Malley as a state prosecutor and is a partner in the law firm of Whiteford, Taylor & Preston.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2012
Baltimore Comptroller Joan M. Pratt and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake continued to spar Monday over the purchase of phone-related equipment by the mayor's technology office, purchases Pratt says violate city procurement regulations. Pratt, who has released records documenting the purchase of hundreds of thousands of dollars of phone equipment, said she disagreed with City Solicitor George Nilson's recent written opinion that the transaction was appropriate. "Mr Nilson can describe this purchase in any way that he wishes, but the fact remains that there was no basis for the Mayor's Office of Information Technology to procure a telephone system outside the charter-mandated process," Pratt said Monday after a meeting of the city's spending board.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Baltimore's city solicitor defended Friday the purchase of high-tech phones and other equipment by MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration - an expense that has been questioned by another top City Hall official. George A. Nilson said the purchase of video phones and other equipment "was neither out of the ordinary, nor in violation of law. " The purchase was made under a contract for computer equipment, which Nilson argued was allowed because the phones could be considered computer hardware.
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