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By Lou Cedrone | June 6, 1991
Billy Crystal was watching a television show about ''fantasy vacations'' when he had what he called an epiphany. ''You ever had an epiphany?,'' he asked. ''I have them all the time.''Epiphany has several meanings. One is ''the sudden, almost divine understanding of a particular subject.'' That was the kind Crystal had.''I literally wrote down 'City Slickers' as I watched the show,'' he said. ''I put it down as the title of my next film, and I went so far as to write Jack Palance's name down.
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By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2011
The ideal summer vacation for Jen Grottenthaler typically involves a beach and "drinks with little umbrellas in them. " Certainly more adventurous than her former college roommate, Sherry Insley has loved being around the water since the days she used to go sportfishing with her family off Ocean City . Neither had ever heard of handfishing, or as the locals call it, noodling. So how did two thirtysomethings with young children living in Baltimore wind up spending nearly a week this summer in an Oklahoma town so small it's not even on the map?
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1996
Two very good films compete with each other at 8: 30 tonight. Watch them both, if you can."The Bottom Line" (11 a.m.-noon, WBAL, Channel 11) -- Here's your chance to meet some of the new boys in town, as a flock of Ravens joins host Kweisi Mfume, Johnny Unitas, and Sun sportswriter John Steadman in discussing the NFL's return to Baltimore. Among the players: Larry Webster, Michael Jackson, Vashone Adams, Antonio Langham and Derrick Alexander."Mad About You" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
You might not think a reality TV series titled "Hillbilly Handfishin'" would have much to do with Baltimore and East Coast urban living. But that's not the case. The series that premieres Sunday  at 10 p.m. on Animal Planet will feature at least three couples from the area during its 12-episode run, according to John Jones, post-production supervising producer on the series and resident of Federal Hill. Here's how Animal Planet describes the series (and you can see a video below)
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By Lou Cedrone | July 5, 1991
Daniel Stern, one of the ''City Slickers'' in the movie that is doing so well at the box office, says he had no trouble riding in the movie. ''I had had one horrible experience on a horse, but I showed up and had no fear,'' he said. ''The horse will do what you say. It's a leap of faith.''''City Slickers'' is about three city boys who play ranch hands for two weeks. As they do, they talk male talk, which has led some critics to say that the film is for men more than women.''I don't know that it's limited in that way,'' said Stern.
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By Rick Sylvain and Rick Sylvain,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 28, 1991
LEWISTOWN, Mont. -- When computer programmer William White saw "City Slickers," the Billy Crystal movie about stressed-out city types taking a cowboy vacation, he decided to trade his hard drive for a cattle drive."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 7, 1991
'City Slickers'Starring Billy Crystal and Jack Palance.Directed by Ron Underwood.Released by Columbia/Castle Rock.Rated PG-13.***In "City Slickers," the whiny, sensitive boys from the Levi's Docker ads meet the Marlboro man. Talk about a commercial movie!As synthetic as this sounds, it's all the more synthetic on the screen -- and it's also very, very funny.Billy Crystal plays Mitch Robbins, a New York advertising salesman who, at 39, has begun to slip into the coma known as middle age. He misses a life he never had and wants a life that doesn't exist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney | December 6, 1991
CITY SLICKERS0$ RCA/Columbia Pictures Home Video$99.95"City Slickers" is slick all right -- a real Hollywood-style button puncher of a comedy that has something for everyone. It's well-crafted and predictable, but then star Billy Crystal is known for his entertainment value, not his artistic aspirations.One look at the film's credits should tell what's to come: Lowell Ganz and Babaloo Mandell, the writers behind Ron Howard hits like "Splash" and "Parenthood," have taken the western motif (the rage since "Dances With Wolves")
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Staff Writer | August 23, 1992
Mike Polk knows the heartache of having a child who suffers from a terminal illness. He also knows the frustration of jetting cross-country on a shoe-string budget in search of a cure -- or a few precious minutes.In August 1990, Mr. Polk received an 8 a.m. phone call from his wife, Della. She told him to board a plane immediately for Lexington, Ky., where their 9-year-old son, Chris, was losing his fight with cancer.Mr. Polk arrived at 3 p.m. and was at the hospital 30 minutes later. At 5 p.m., Chris slipped into a coma and never regained consciousness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
You might not think a reality TV series titled "Hillbilly Handfishin'" would have much to do with Baltimore and East Coast urban living. But that's not the case. The series that premieres Sunday  at 10 p.m. on Animal Planet will feature at least three couples from the area during its 12-episode run, according to John Jones, post-production supervising producer on the series and resident of Federal Hill. Here's how Animal Planet describes the series (and you can see a video below)
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By michael sragow and michael sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 17, 2006
The late Jack Palance changed the face, the posture, the attitude of the Oscars 14 years ago, when he celebrated winning the best supporting actor Academy Award with a couple of off-color jokes and two-handed and then one-armed push-ups. Every year from then on, the show's director, producer and host have prayed for the gift that Palance handed Billy Crystal, who kept bouncing onstage with updates like "Jack Palance just bungee-jumped off the Hollywood sign" or "The shuttle just rendezvoused with Jack Palance, who somehow launched himself into orbit."
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By Myrna Oliver and Myrna Oliver,Los Angeles Times | November 11, 2006
Jack Palance, the leather-faced, gravelly voiced actor who earned Academy Award nominations for Sudden Fear and Shane before capturing an Oscar for his role as the crusty trail boss in the 1991 comedy western, City Slickers, has died. He was 87. Mr. Palance, who had been in failing health, died yesterday of natural causes in Montecito, Calif., at the home of his daughter Holly, family members said. He was one of the best-loved bad guys in motion picture and television history - the murderous husband in Sudden Fear (1952)
NEWS
August 22, 2006
Tony Jay, 73, an actor who was the voice of Judge Frollo in the 1996 animated Disney film The Hunchback of Notre Dame, died Aug. 13 in Los Angeles from complications after surgery for lung cancer. Born in London, Mr. Jay began acting when he was 30 after moving to South Africa to work in theater, television and radio. Upon returning to London, he portrayed Shylock in The Merchant of Venice and appeared in the Royal Shakespeare Company's Nicholas Nickleby. He moved to Los Angeles in 1986.
NEWS
January 21, 2004
Mr. Hechinger led the family business, Hechinger Co., from 1958 to 1996. During his tenure, the company grew to a multibillion-dollar enterprise with more than 100 stores in the East and the Midwest. The company filed for bankruptcy in 1999, unable to compete with discount home industry giants like Home Depot and Lowes. Mr. Hechinger was a committed supporter of District of Columbia home rule. In 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson replaced the three-man board of district commissioners with a new mayor-council style of government and appointed Mr. Hechinger chairman of the first council, a post he held for two years.
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By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2003
WENATCHEE, Washington - When Californians Dave and Laurie Schmidt moved to Montana in the 1980s, they knew the dirt road to their cabin - a route that takes visitors over a river and through a ghost town - would disappear under mounds of snow for months every year. They knew that there'd be no curbside trash or recycling pickup and that they'd probably have to drive several miles on rutted country roads to pick up their mail. But that's what the adventurous couple wanted - and that's what they got. So they were surprised when some of their neighbors - recent arrivals from distant cities who'd purchased 20-acre ranchettes with dreams of a quiet, rural existence - started to complain about the absence of such amenities.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 17, 2002
I LEFT Maryland's shining bay, crossed the dormant Plains and arrived in the land of white-capped majesty, looking for snow. While in Colorado, I saw bald eagles on the hunt in mountain gorges. I inhaled the exhilarating, crystal clear air at more than 10,000 feet. And I made an discovery. What do some cowboys do when they're not driving cattle or mending fences? They write poetry. I know this because I attended the 13th annual Colorado Cowboy Poetry Gathering. My Colorado friends, Jim and Barb Hermanson of the Denver suburb of Aurora, were determined to "Westernize" me. The first step was to meet a cowboy.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | June 7, 1991
CITY SLICKERS'' is one of those rare cinematic happenings: a movie that deftly combines laughs with sentiment and an occasionally serious thought. The sentiment and the seriousness never intrude on the laughs."
FEATURES
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,Orlando Sentinel | August 30, 1991
At last week's meeting of the American Psychological Association in San Francisco, researchers presented the results of a new study conducted at St. Petersburg's Eckerd College. The report showed that movies that open near the end of the year stand a better chance of receiving Oscar nominations than movies released before September.Like, tell me something I don't know!If those eggheads had bothered to ask, I could have saved them a lot of time and energy by pointing out what has long been obvious to even the most casual Oscar-watchers.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1996
Two very good films compete with each other at 8: 30 tonight. Watch them both, if you can."The Bottom Line" (11 a.m.-noon, WBAL, Channel 11) -- Here's your chance to meet some of the new boys in town, as a flock of Ravens joins host Kweisi Mfume, Johnny Unitas, and Sun sportswriter John Steadman in discussing the NFL's return to Baltimore. Among the players: Larry Webster, Michael Jackson, Vashone Adams, Antonio Langham and Derrick Alexander."Mad About You" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 20, 1995
Take a male romantic, a female realist and a dilapidated farmhouse, throw in a couple of teen-agers, a spendthrift caretaker, a nasty neighbor and a rich uncle, and what do you have?It's the Carroll Players' version of the 1940 Moss Hart and George Kaufman comedy, "George Washington Slept Here." The play opens tonight at Frock's Sunnybrook Farm on Bond Street, Westminster.The laughs begin when Newton Fuller, played by Jim Naylor, buys an abandoned, supposedly historical farmhouse in the country as a surprise for his wife, Annabelle, played by M. L. Grout.
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