Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCity Schools
IN THE NEWS

City Schools

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 18, 2010
The article "Plan to revamp schools" (Nov. 17) provided a profile of not only the poor performance of many city schools but also insights into why some of the problems exist — namely, the plans to provide special programs for the "growing international population" and to strengthen English for Speakers of Other Languages programs. One of the poor performing schools cited, Patterson High, happens to be my alma mater. In the '60s when I attended, the community had its fair share of immigrants who did not arrive in the U.S. fluent in the English language.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 28, 2014
We read with interest Baltimore City schools CEO Gregory Thornton's commentary about the challenges ahead for the city's schools ( "Much work to be done," Aug. 25). As he indicates, one of the greatest barriers to student achievement is attendance, where there is still substantial work to do. Baltimore continues to suffer from rampant truancy and chronic absenteeism. What can we do to address this crisis? Since 2005, the University of Baltimore School of Law and its partners have worked with the schools to operate a Truancy Court Program, an early intervention, non-adversarial, non-punitive approach to truancy that aims to identify why children are not attending school and then attempts to resolve the underlying problems or causes.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Baltimore schools CEO Andrés Alonso tearfully announced his resignation Monday, ending a six-year tenure marked by bold yet often divisive reforms and casting uncertainty on the future of the long-troubled school system. Under Alonso's leadership, city schools saw growth in test scores, graduation rates and enrollment, but his administration was dogged by fiscal problems and cheating scandals. "I have enjoyed being the superintendent of the school system in ways that are so astonishing," Alonso said, choking back tears.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Cordelia D. Oliver, a retired Baltimore public schools educator who was one of the first African-American docents at the Baltimore Museum of Art , died Aug. 4 at Gilchrist Hospice care in Towson of complications from a stroke. She was 92. "Cordelia was a wonderful person, and if anyone met her, they were instantly drawn to her because of her personality," said Camay Calloway Murphy of Baltimore, former executive director of the Eubie Blake Cultural Center and onetime Baltimore school board member.
NEWS
May 28, 2013
Kudos to Erica Green for keeping on top of the Baltimore school finances ("Audit faults schools over federal funds," May 23). Many of the problems outlined in the most recent report can be traced to poor accounting procedures - including no documentation for time worked and inappropriate spending. There are systemic problems that have persisted over time and need to be addressed. The schools should be getting financial advice from the network of advisers set up to guide schools on business matters.
NEWS
March 5, 2013
I recently had the privilege of speaking to an enthusiastic and hopeful crowd gathered in Annapolis to urge lawmakers to pass a bill allowing the state of Maryland to renovate or rebuild Baltimore City's school buildings over the next 10 years through an innovative financing arrangement ("Thousands rally for city schools construction plan," Feb. 26). We are not asking for additional funds but a simply a long-term commitment of funds already allocated by the state so that the city's school buildings can be brought on a par with those in the counties and with charter schools.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | March 16, 2012
City schools released the following congratulations this week: Ten Baltimore City public schools have been recognized by the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) for the academic performance of their students, according to a release sent from city school system.  The schools were recognized by the state for either their performance on the 2011 Maryland School Assessment (MSA)--they had to have made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)-- or the High School Assessment (HSA)
NEWS
November 8, 2012
The most recent data on high school graduation and dropout rates from the Maryland State Department of Education suggest that while Baltimore City still lags behind other jurisdictions, it is making solid progress in its school reform effort. Graduation rates have risen and dropout rates have fallen. Baltimore isn't out of the woods yet, but the numbers suggest that the reforms put into place by city schools CEO Andrés Alonso starting in 2007 are beginning to show results. The latest data are the first produced under the state's new method of calculating graduation and dropout rates, which tracks the academic progress of individual students in greater detail than ever before.
NEWS
February 14, 2013
The latest statistics from the Maryland State Department of Education show Baltimore City making steady progress toward increasing the number of students who finish high school. Last year city schools awarded 149 more diplomas than in 2011, and the city's 3.3 percentage point decline in dropouts was the largest in the region. That's great news for all the teachers, principals and school staff who have worked so hard to get the city's schools back on track. Since his arrival in Baltimore six years ago, schools CEO Andrés Alonso has made boosting high school graduation rates a priority of his reform effort, and during that period the schools' dropout rate has declined by more than half.
NEWS
December 16, 2010
While everyone is busy congratulating themselves on the passage of our groundbreaking new teachers' contract, one that allows for teachers' pay rates to be tied to their students' performance for the first time, it is important to realize just how little this innovation will impact the real problems in our school system. After all, it is not like most teachers have been holding back their teaching efforts in the hope of winning a pay raise. While we probably have the best urban school commissioner in the country and he has things moving in the right direction for the first time in anyone's memory, what is really holding our system (and city)
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
Last year, the Common Core was debated by everyone from conservative talk show hosts to parents flooding state capitals, and teachers rebelled against a new evaluation system they believe is unfair. Now it's year two for the phase-in of controversial education reforms. And while students returning to Maryland classrooms this week may be blissfully unaware of the debate, they will see more changes. First, they can forget about the MSA (Maryland School Assessment) and learn the name for new state tests: PARCC, or Partnership for Assessment for Readiness for College and Careers.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
As hundreds of Baltimore public school graduates prepare to set foot on a four-year college campus in Maryland this month, nearly half will notice something familiar on their schedules: a class they took in high school. More than from any other school district in the state, Baltimore students' test scores have pushed them into noncredit remedial courses that they must take before college-level classes, according to new data from the Maryland Higher Education Commission. The 46 percent of city students needing remedial courses in Maryland's public universities in the 2012-2013 school year, the most recent data available, was nearly double that of neighboring districts in the Baltimore region.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Baltimore finance director Harry Black is resigning to become the city manager of Cincinnati - the latest of at least six high-level departures from City Hall in a year. A Park Heights native, Black had been the city's finance director for about 21/2 years. He will be replaced by Finance Department deputy Henry Raymond, according to the mayor's office. Black's last day in Baltimore will be Aug. 20. His new job is pending approval of the Cincinnati City Council. “I would like to thank Mr. Black for his dedicated service to my administration and the City of Baltimore,” Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Ollie M.J. Ray, whose career teaching in city public schools spanned nearly four decades, died Tuesday of heart failure at Northwest Hospital. She was 82. "They say teachers are born, and Ollie had not only the native ability to be a teacher but also the desire," said Hayyte Jackson, who was a college friend and later a colleague in Baltimore public schools. "She had a great love for children and young people, and wanted to see them receive their appropriate secular and Christian education," said Mrs. Jackson, who retired in 1993 from Windsor Hills Elementary School, where she had been principal.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2014
A Baltimore City schools police officer pleaded guilty Monday to drug conspiracy charges in U.S. District Court, and faces no less than five years in prison. Napoleon McLain Jr., 31, a four-year veteran whose father was a longtime Baltimore Police homicide detective, pleaded guilty to conspiring to distribute crack cocaine and drug possession with intent to distribute cocaine base. According to his plea agreement, McLain sold cocaine to a confidential source, who was working with authorities, on four occasions between December 2012 and August 2013.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | July 1, 2014
New Baltimore schools CEO Gregory Thornton kicked off his first day on the job Tuesday by visiting summer school sites around the city with new cabinet members and taking stock of some of the work he has in front of him over the next four years. As the new schools chief, who signed a $290,000 contract to lead the district until 2018, visited Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical Senior High School, he talked about expanding summer school programs and college-and-career readiness opportunities to more students.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
The Baltimore City school board voted Tuesday to pass the district's proposed $1.31 billion budget, which includes a decrease in the per-pupil funding for charter schools. As the amount spent on students in traditional schools increases, the system's 33 charter schools will see their per-pupil expenditures drop by $257 from 2012, for a total of $9,007. The overall amount for charters, however, has steadily increased as their populations grow. The charters are funded differently than traditional schools.
NEWS
February 20, 2014
As Baltimore City public schools move into a new chapter with new leadership and embark on a major building campaign, the arts offer a unique opportunity to transform our schools. We thank the city commissioners for choosing a new CEO with a track record of supporting the arts ( "Welcome, Mr. Thornton," Feb. 19). The performing and visual arts build students' capacities for creativity and innovation. Research is clear that the arts heighten students' motivation and build their abilities in communication, collaboration and critical judgment.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Edwin Cohen, a retired public school, university and religious school educator and administrator who was also executive director of Camps Airy and Louise in Western Maryland for nearly three decades, died June 21 of complications after surgery at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown. The longtime Pikesville resident was 87. "Ed was wonderful, cheerful and happy. He had a great sense of humor and an infectious smile," said Floyd L. Herman, rabbi emeritus at Har Sinai Congregation. "He really cared about all kinds of people and as a teacher, he wanted them to be able to do their best.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
Art conservator Lori Trusheim leaned out of a second-story window and squinted through her camera at a 72-square-foot copper sculpture that has become a local landmark. The elements have taken a toll over the past three decades, and she wants it preserved. But the piece, which depicts eight billowing, blue-green clipper ship sails, isn't in a public square or at a museum. It's mounted to the side of Patterson High School. It was commissioned by the city to represent Patterson's nickname, the Clippers, and students and faculty say it has become a defining part of the school.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.