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NEWS
March 3, 2010
My brother and I graduated Cardinal Gibbons in the late '70s. This place changed my life. I had no idea of it's financial problems. Gibbons has always been a bright spot during troubled times in the city school system. They were personally interested in the individual student. The all-male student body and dress code made for a unique environment and reduced the daily distraction that high school kids deal with today. What a shame. Conrad Johnson
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NEWS
By Tiffany Gueye | June 16, 2014
Last week, The Sun reported on Baltimore City Public School's (BCPS) efforts to increase academic promotion rates among middle school students by giving them the chance to attend BELL (Building Educated Leaders for Life) summer learning programs. The article cited a decline in promotion rates for BELL participants, particularly for 6th graders. While we are disappointed that not all students demonstrate the literacy and math skills they need to be promoted to the next grade, our nonprofit organization, which partners here and nationally with schools to expand learning time in the summer and after school, thinks that focusing on test scores alone obscures important outcomes and raises a key question: What role do summer learning programs have in a student's life?
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NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
Citing the city school system's long-standing failure to provide services for thousands of disabled students, a federal judge gave state education officials control over a sizable portion of the troubled system yesterday. An emergency order, issued by U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis, is the latest development in the politically charged tussle over control of the city school system. It marks yet another sharp turn in a lawsuit that is more than two decades old. Garbis considered proposals submitted by the Maryland State Department of Education, the city school system and the attorneys who represent special-education students.
NEWS
June 9, 2014
Football fans would be aghast at an umpire who moved the goal posts back while the game was still in play. So, it's no wonder city teachers are up in arms over a school system decision at the very end of the year raising the bar that determines whether they get a pay raise or not. The teachers union calls it a classic bait-and-switch and is demanding the issue be renegotiated. Given that the last-minute change could significantly reduce the chances that even very good teachers move up the salary scale, they are right to do so. If the goal of recruiting and retaining excellent teachers is to mean anything, the process for rewarding effectiveness in the classroom has got to be both transparent and fair.
NEWS
February 14, 1995
Social Security must join in budget cutsThe president, Congress and senior citizens are living in a dream world when they declare that this country can reduce taxes, increase defense spending and balance the budget without touching entitlements, particularly Social Security.The selfish attitude of middle- and higher-income senior citizens wishing to push the burden of increasing debt onto their children and grandchildren is unbelievable.Granted, there are needy elderly people who need assistance.
NEWS
September 12, 1998
SO MANY hopes were attached to last year's state-mandated overhaul of the Baltimore City public schools that all student achievement tests are scrutinized eagerly for any signs of turnaround. That's why palpable disappointment followed the release of the latest scores from a twice-a-year reading and math test.Instead of showing system-wide progress, the scores suggest that while some pupils are making headway, many others are not. The results are so lacking in consistency that no broad judgment can be made about the city school system other than to say it is still undeperforming badly.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | October 18, 2009
Ten Baltimore organizations have received $2.6 million in matching grants from philanthropist George Soros to fund programs intended to ease escalating needs amid the economic downturn, the Open Society Institute's city chapter announced. Soros created the Special Fund for Poverty Alleviation to help people particularly affected by the dismal financial climate. He allocated a total of $5 million for OSI's Baltimore office, the remainder of which will be distributed in 2010. "In this particular time with the economic recession, some populations that are most vulnerable have been very hard hit," said Diana Morris, OSI-Baltimore's director.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2005
Record-keeping problems could cost Baltimore's school system at least $12.2 million - and perhaps millions more - as federal auditors examine the spending of Medicaid dollars earmarked for special-education students. The $12.2 million represents about half of the $24 million in Medicaid money the city schools received in the 1999-2000 school year for services such as speech and physical therapy. Federal auditors had problems proving that the services were provided and the people who provided the services were qualified to do so. The auditors plan to examine four additional years of records, and if they are found lacking, the city schools could be liable for millions more.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | March 19, 1993
In the annual battle of the budget in Annapolis, Baltimore's ailing school system is under the gun.The issue: a move by the House of Delegates to withhold $4.8 million in city school aid as a way of prodding what some legislators see as a recalcitrant school administration.In less than a week's time, the House action has become a virtual referendum on the city school system and on the propriety of state interference in the affairs of local government. And it has revealed a split in thinking between the House and the Senate on how best to encourage Baltimore school reform, as well a rift among city officials themselves.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,1990 U.S. Census/APStaff Writer | September 18, 1992
Baltimore had one of the highest concentrations of high-school dropouts in the country in 1990 and the second-highest in the Northeast, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.Census data reported to Congress by the U.S. Department of Education this week show that 22.8 percent of all 16- to 19-year-olds living in the city had not completed high school or were not currently enrolled in school.The data rank Baltimore ninth in the nation, behind Trenton, N.J., and seven California cities.But school and business officials in Baltimore disagree on whether the Census Bureau data accurately reflect the city's chronic dropout problems.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | April 8, 2014
Baltimore city school officials presented Tuesday a budget scenario that could call for "considerable staff layoffs and de-funding key contracts that serve schools" if a $31 million deficit is not closed. In a presentation to the city school board, which can be viewed here , school officials unveiled the first draft of how revenues and expenditures are shaping up for next year. The actual budget for fiscal year 2015 will not be presented until next month, when it also has to be adopted.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | October 16, 2013
The Baltimore city school system will continue to monitor all schools administering the Maryland School Assessments this year, a measure that was questioned because the test scores won't be used to gauge schools' progress amid a transition to a new curriculum. Interim schools CEO Tisha Edwards said the school district would continue the monitoring because although the MSA will soon be phased out, "as of today, it is not obsolete. " The school system began deploying monitors to every school during testing in 2011, at a cost of about $400,000 per year, after school officials and The Baltimore Sun found that several schools that had administered the tests to students in grades three through eight had either cheated or were being investigated for improprieties.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and By Erica L. Green | October 8, 2013
The Baltimore City school system has launched a campaign to raise $400,000 to help families afford school uniforms, interim CEO Tisha Edwards announced Tuesday. “We all have the opportunity to make sure that every student has a uniform, and that it's never a barrier to them coming to school," Edwards said. Edwards announced the campaign, which will be hosted by Combined Charities of Baltimore City, at the city school board meeting, following through on an idea she proposed this summer to help families afford school apparel.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
The Baltimore school board unanimously passed a $1.2 billion budget Monday that essentially remained intact since it was presented. The last budget of outgoing schools CEO Andrés Alonso includes cuts to per-pupil funding and high schools but retains spending power for principals and adds academic programs. The $793 million that would go to schools represents a 36 percent increase since 2008, when Alonso implemented the "Fair Student Funding" structure — which funds schools based on enrollment and gives principals autonomy over their budgets and hiring.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
The city school board is considering proposals for seven charter schools that include two named for female trailblazers, another attempt at an all-male, college-preparatory program in East Baltimore, and an elementary school for at-risk youths. The new programs were presented to the Baltimore school board Tuesday as part of the district's annual charter application process. The applicants, the majority of which want to open in 2014, had made it through at least one round of interviews with a district charter advisory board.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Gretchen Crews, a retired librarian, teacher and club manager, died Dec. 27 at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center of injuries sustained in a fall at her Towson home. She was 83. Born Gretchen Matthews in Baltimore and raised in Wyman Park, she was the daughter of Howard Matthews, a state auditor, and his wife Gretchen, a home economics teacher and homemaker. She attended Margaret Brent School in Charles Village and was a 1947 Eastern High School graduate. She earned an English degree at Goucher College and later received a library science degree at Towson University She taught English in the city public school system and later was a librarian, both in the school system and at the old Bay College at Howard and Centre streets.
NEWS
January 12, 2006
Baltimore school officials have been getting an earful from angry students, parents and community residents who fear that their neighborhood schools might close as part of a systemwide downsizing effort. The protesters are right to press their case, since the Board of School Commissioners is still two months away from any final decisions. But the board also needs to honor its promise of a totally transparent process. Declining enrollment and pressure from the state are forcing the city school system to eliminate more than 2 million square feet of space in the next three years.
NEWS
October 23, 2005
In Maryland's cities and elsewhere, an underclass of disconnected teens and young adults struggles silently to make a life and a living. They need help - from guardians, neighborhoods and governments. Instead, they are neglected or they receive such unreliable aid that they feel safer going it alone. That's dangerous for them and for Maryland, which cannot afford to lose at least 15 percent of its future work force statewide, according to an estimate by the nonprofit Annie E. Casey Foundation.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2012
The Baltimore school system is evaluating whether to retain hundreds of temporary employees and plans to let many of them go by the end of the week - before schools close for the holiday break. Tisha Edwards, chief of staff for the school system, said the effort to cut down on temporary employees was spurred several months ago by the city's teachers union, which expressed concerns about temporary employees filling union jobs. At the same time, school officials vowed to do a better job of checking the credentials of temporary professionals after a worker hired on a temporary basis at Hazelwood Elementary/Middle School was charged last month with sex abuse.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
The Baltimore school system failed to follow its policies when hiring a temporary employee who allegedly misrepresented himself as a child therapist and is now charged with raping a teen. City school officials said Shawn Nowlin, a 27-year-old arrested Nov. 26 on charges that he impregnated a 15-year-old in Harford County, was hired in September 2011 to oversee "partnership coordination" and act as a community liaison at Hazelwood Elementary/Middle School under the title "Temporary Professional II. " Nowlin was employed for a year under that title, but the rules say temporary workers' employment cannot exceed 90 days.
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