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By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2003
Baltimore school officials have decided not to renew a contract with a consultant and former management employee who has played a key role in overseeing bus operations. City school district spokeswoman Edie House confirmed yesterday that Otis Jackson, formerly the second-in-command in the district's transportation division, would not be retained. Jackson, who formally retired this year but then returned as a consultant, had been working under a 90-day contract that had been extended into early July, according to House.
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NEWS
January 14, 2014
The county executives from Baltimore, Montgomery and Prince George's counties went to Annapolis today to present a united front in an effort to get the state to commit to a long-term, enhanced funding stream to help them build and renovate schools. Though they did not make it an explicit part of their pitch, the unmistakable subtext for lawmakers was the state's decision last year to commit to just such an arrangement with Baltimore City. If the state was willing to commit $20 million a year to support more than $1 billion in construction borrowing for the city, why not for three counties that together comprise 44 percent of the state's schoolchildren?
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NEWS
April 28, 2004
THE DECISION was painful but tragically inevitable: This year, summer school is a casualty of the city school district's financial troubles. Though initially poorly planned, and ultimately too expensive, summer was valuable for some students. The district relied on summer school to help about 25 percent of failing elementary and middle school students and many high-schoolers advance a grade, since social promotion standards were changed three years ago. It may not have been the most cost-effective or successful reform, but it gave the city a jolt: Until summer school was launched, who realized that up to 40,000 children a year were struggling to complete a grade?
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
School officials in Baltimore and Baltimore County pledged Thursday to track, for the first time, automated camera citations that are issued to privately owned school buses hired to transport public-school children. The assurances came after The Baltimore Sun reported that since 2009 cameras have caught hundreds of school buses speeding near the schools they serve, often with children aboard. Privately owned buses have received at least 800 speed camera tickets in the city, while city-owned buses have amassed more than 50, The Sun found by analyzing citation records.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1996
Nearly $6 million in state funding for Baltimore's schools is at stake as the General Assembly's budget committees meet today to hear a report critical of school administrators' progress in addressing required reforms.Lawmakers held up the money in April and said it would not be released unless Baltimore school officials could show "substantial progress" in enacting the reforms recommended by consultant in a 1992 report.Today's session will match city and school officials, who are defending their progress, against state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick, who has been asked by legislators to make a recommendation on whether to release the funding that had been earmarked for school administrative salaries and benefits.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1994
Responding to a torrent of criticism of the state's threatened intervention at Frederick Douglass and Patterson high schools, several Baltimore City Council members said last night that they would seek additional state money to improve the schools."
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2010
The tentative contract agreement between the Baltimore Teachers Union and the city school district strives to protect educators from what they believe are subjective actions by principals, who have been given greater leeway in decisions about their schools during the tenure of schools CEO Andrés Alonso. Principals' power over teacher assignments and evaluations has been a sticking point for the union, which hopes to find balance with the proposed contract that gives teachers more control over their working conditions and the opportunity to earn hefty pay increases.
NEWS
January 14, 2014
The county executives from Baltimore, Montgomery and Prince George's counties went to Annapolis today to present a united front in an effort to get the state to commit to a long-term, enhanced funding stream to help them build and renovate schools. Though they did not make it an explicit part of their pitch, the unmistakable subtext for lawmakers was the state's decision last year to commit to just such an arrangement with Baltimore City. If the state was willing to commit $20 million a year to support more than $1 billion in construction borrowing for the city, why not for three counties that together comprise 44 percent of the state's schoolchildren?
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2011
On the heels of 330 teachers' accepting early retirement packages from the city school system, officials will propose a similar deal for 500 of its most experienced instructional support staff. According to an early retirement incentive plan scheduled to be presented at the city school board meeting Tuesday night, the school system will look to trim its pool of paraprofessionals who have more than 10 years' experience by offering them 50 percent of their base salary for a year and a sick-leave payout to be put into a school investment plan.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
School officials in Baltimore and Baltimore County pledged Thursday to track, for the first time, automated camera citations that are issued to privately owned school buses hired to transport public-school children. The assurances came after The Baltimore Sun reported that since 2009 cameras have caught hundreds of school buses speeding near the schools they serve, often with children aboard. Privately owned buses have received at least 800 speed camera tickets in the city, while city-owned buses have amassed more than 50, The Sun found by analyzing citation records.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2011
On the heels of 330 teachers' accepting early retirement packages from the city school system, officials will propose a similar deal for 500 of its most experienced instructional support staff. According to an early retirement incentive plan scheduled to be presented at the city school board meeting Tuesday night, the school system will look to trim its pool of paraprofessionals who have more than 10 years' experience by offering them 50 percent of their base salary for a year and a sick-leave payout to be put into a school investment plan.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2010
The tentative contract agreement between the Baltimore Teachers Union and the city school district strives to protect educators from what they believe are subjective actions by principals, who have been given greater leeway in decisions about their schools during the tenure of schools CEO Andrés Alonso. Principals' power over teacher assignments and evaluations has been a sticking point for the union, which hopes to find balance with the proposed contract that gives teachers more control over their working conditions and the opportunity to earn hefty pay increases.
NEWS
April 28, 2004
THE DECISION was painful but tragically inevitable: This year, summer school is a casualty of the city school district's financial troubles. Though initially poorly planned, and ultimately too expensive, summer was valuable for some students. The district relied on summer school to help about 25 percent of failing elementary and middle school students and many high-schoolers advance a grade, since social promotion standards were changed three years ago. It may not have been the most cost-effective or successful reform, but it gave the city a jolt: Until summer school was launched, who realized that up to 40,000 children a year were struggling to complete a grade?
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2003
Baltimore school officials have decided not to renew a contract with a consultant and former management employee who has played a key role in overseeing bus operations. City school district spokeswoman Edie House confirmed yesterday that Otis Jackson, formerly the second-in-command in the district's transportation division, would not be retained. Jackson, who formally retired this year but then returned as a consultant, had been working under a 90-day contract that had been extended into early July, according to House.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1996
Nearly $6 million in state funding for Baltimore's schools is at stake as the General Assembly's budget committees meet today to hear a report critical of school administrators' progress in addressing required reforms.Lawmakers held up the money in April and said it would not be released unless Baltimore school officials could show "substantial progress" in enacting the reforms recommended by consultant in a 1992 report.Today's session will match city and school officials, who are defending their progress, against state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick, who has been asked by legislators to make a recommendation on whether to release the funding that had been earmarked for school administrative salaries and benefits.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1994
Responding to a torrent of criticism of the state's threatened intervention at Frederick Douglass and Patterson high schools, several Baltimore City Council members said last night that they would seek additional state money to improve the schools."
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | July 2, 2013
Update : As of Tuesday, July 9, the district had trimmed the list of principal vacancies down to 15. An inquiry from The Sun on July 1 about the 25 previous vacancies advertised last week was not addressed by the district. The Baltimore City school district is embarking upon another school year that will note a high level of principal turnover, with job postings for 25 schools as of July 3, a number the administrators union said has reached 30 and may continue to rise.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
As the city school district debates a new plan from Interim CEO Tisha Edwards to hold principals accountable for chronic absenteeism, many have inquired about how incoming CEO Gregory Thornton deals with attendance accountability in Milwaukee. The Sun received a detailed plan for how Thornton has tackled the issue. Here is what we learned from his team: Steps Thornton has taken to improve attendance include: •    A daily summary of attendance figures by school, region and the district; reviewed by Regional Superintendents daily and discussed weekly with the Superintendent •    Principals have developed attendance action plans •    Schools have attendance committees that are spearheaded by the principal and include representative staff and parents •    Regional Superintendents collaborate with district social workers and the regional administrative teams who work directly with school-based social workers on attendance issues •    Stronger emphasis on Positive Behavior and Intervention Supports (MPS has the nation's largest concentration of students participating in PBIS)
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