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By Erica L. Green and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Three new members were appointed to the Baltimore City school board, Gov. Martin O'Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Tuesday. In a release, the officials announced that Cheryl A. Casciani will begin July 1, and Anthony A. Hamilton and Peter Kannam would immediately begin their terms. Two current board members, Tina Marie Hike-Hubbard and Shanaysha Marie Sauls were re-appointed to their posts. The new board members will replace longtime commissioners Maxine Wood, Jerrelle Francois, and outgoing board Chair Neil Duke.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Robert L. Karwacki, a retired Maryland Court of Appeals judge who was president of the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners during the troubled early 1970s, died of kidney failure Monday at his Chester home. The former Mount Vernon resident was 80. He was named head of the city's school board in 1970 and assisted in the appointment of Baltimore's first African-American schools superintendent. "Brown v. the Board was years earlier; Bob was a master in maintaining educational stability," said former Baltimore Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro III, who named him to the school post.
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NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | July 26, 2006
Baltimore school board member Douglas R. Kington said last night that he is resigning, effective Monday - creating a vacancy for political opponents Mayor Martin O'Malley and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to fill. Kington, a commercial real estate broker, has served on the nine-member board since September 2004. He said he is resigning primarily to spend more time with his family, mainly his elderly parents and his daughter. "I love what I did dearly," Kington said of his volunteer position on the school board, but he said it was so time-consuming that "I could've put in 80 hours a week."
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
The Baltimore school board voted Tuesday to fully fund programs for gifted students, which were originally slated for cuts next year, and to tap its rainy-day fund to avoid layoffs and cuts to central office operations. The board voted 7-2 to adopt the $1.3 billion budget, which restores more than $30,000 in funding cuts to the International Baccalaureate programs at City College and the Mount Washington School. The system will also maintain the same amount of funding as last year for another gifted program, the Ingenuity Project, which has seen reduced financing from the district in recent years and still cannot accommodate the number of students eligible for the program.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2005
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley said yesterday that the head of Comcast's Baltimore operation and the host of a local radio segment will join the city school board. Also yesterday, Ehrlich named new members to the state school board, the Baltimore City Community College board and the Baltimore liquor board. Kalman R. "Buzzy" Hettleman, who has served on the city school board since January, was reappointed. The board's two new members will be Michael C. Parker, vice president and general manager of Comcast in Baltimore, and Anirban Basu, head of the Baltimore economic consulting firm Sage Policy Group and host of Morning Economic Report on Baltimore's WYPR-FM.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | January 15, 1991
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is weighing the question of whether the city school board should be abolished."When the charter revision commission looks at the charter, that's a question that ought to be discussed," Schmoke said yesterday.But the mayor also said there is a long tradition of active citizen involvement with the existing school board system.As a result, he said, "I would be reluctant to just discuss [abolition] cavalierly."Under a City Council resolution, a study group this winter is to start considering revision of the city charter.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | July 28, 2006
Baltimore school board member Michael C. Parker is being transferred to a job in Connecticut, creating the second vacancy on the nine-member board in less than a week. Parker, the head of Comcast's Baltimore operation, has been promoted to be the company's area vice president for New Haven, Conn., and New York effective Aug. 1. In an e-mail to The Sun yesterday, he confirmed that he is stepping down from the school board, to which he was appointed a year ago. On Tuesday, board member Douglas R. Kington said he will resign effective Monday to spend more time with family.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | September 29, 1991
Walter G. Amprey, Baltimore's new school superintendent, handed the city school board an outline of his goals for the system at a meeting of the board yesterday but was persuaded by board members not to make the document public.During a break in the meeting, the 46-year-old Dr. Amprey said that he was willing to release a copy of his goals but deferred to the board president and members, who kept it confidential."It's in a very preliminary stage. We have to have discussion on it, and if it's in good shape we'll release it to the general public" within several weeks, said school board President Joseph Lee Smith.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | January 23, 1993
Angered by a plan to redraw Baltimore's school districts, city Councilman Timothy D. Murphy is calling for school board members to be elected, instead of appointed by the mayor, as they are now.But opponents of the 6th District Democrat's proposed charter amendment say it could further politicize the city school system, and they reject claims that the current board is alienated from the public.Mr. Murphy argues that an elected board would be more responsive to the public, citing the current furor over school rezoning.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
City school officials facing a $31 million budget shortfall next year have proposed dipping into the system's rainy day fund to close the gap. But that's not what those dollars are supposed to be for. The whole point of setting aside emergency funds is to cushion the impact of major unanticipated disruptions, from natural disasters to sudden economic crises. They're not a backstop for the kind of foreseeable, year-to-year budgetary ups and downs that ought to be part of the routine planning process, and using them that way would set a terrible precedent for the future.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
A veteran Baltimore city educator has been appointed to serve as a commissioner on the city school board. Linda M. Chinnia, who served for a total of 38 years in the city school system before stepping down as its chief academic officer in 2007 when former schools CEO Andres Alonso arrived, was jointly appointed by Gov. Martin O'Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. Her term begins immediately, according to an announcement from the governor's office. "I am confident that she possesses the skill and leadership necessary to ensure that every child in Baltimore City receives the high-quality public education they deserve," O'Malley said in  a statement.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
The Baltimore school board is considering a more than 20 percent tuition increase next year for students who are not residents, which would make the city's rates higher than Baltimore County's and competitive with some Catholic programs. Officials have proposed raising tuition for middle and high school students to $7,500. Elementary-age students would pay $7,000. Currently, the district charges $5,900 for middle/high school tuition and $5,670 for elementary tuition. School officials said the increase would make its tuition rates, currently among the lowest in the state, more competitive.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
The Baltimore school board voted Tuesday to give a four-year contract worth more than $1 million to Gregory Thornton, the Milwaukee administrator introduced last month as the next superintendent of the school system. The contract, approved unanimously by the board, includes a base salary of $290,000 for Thornton, who takes his post July 1. That salary is tied with that of the Prince George's County schools superintendent, currently the highest-paid superintendent in Maryland, state salary records show.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | February 7, 2014
Candidates for the next Baltimore schools superintendent seat have reached the vetting stage, city school board officials said Thursday, and the search for the news schools chief is still on schedule to be completed by spring. Shanaysha Sauls, chair of the city school board, said there were an "encouraging field of applicants. " She said they "feel good" about the number of applicants, but declined to say how many there were. “Our progress, assets and opportunities in Baltimore have made this an attractive position," she said.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and By Erica L. Green | October 15, 2013
Updated: Teach for America teachers do have to pass the Praxis exam to teach in Maryland. The Baltimore City school board has requested that the district follow through on a plan to assess the effectiveness of teachers who are alternatively certified through programs like Teach for America that for years have funneled teachers into the city's struggling schools. The city school board approved last week the $880,000 contract to hire and train 125 to 150 Teach For America teachers for the 2013-2014 school year.  The board also approved a $735,000 contract to hire the same amount of teachers from the Baltimore City Teaching Residency, another alternative certification program the district annually recruits from for its high-need areas.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
The family of a Baltimore school student was awarded a $50,000 settlement after their son was severely injured on a faulty playground at Francis Scott Key Elementary/Middle School last year. The city's Board of Estimates approved the settlement this week, which stemmed from a $100,000 negligence lawsuit against the city school board for the boy's injuries. According to the claim approved by the city's board, the boy fractured his arms in March 2012 when he was pushed from the school's jungle gym. The jungle gym, the suit claimed, did not have retaining panels on the platform, which would have provided protection from a fall.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
A recent appointee to the Baltimore City school board resigned Thursday, according to the mayor's office, which said it had discovered inconsistencies in his resume. Anthony A. Hamilton said he held a master's degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Education, according to biographical information on the board's website and a news release from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Gov. Martin O'Malley announcing his appointment to the board in June. But a Hopkins spokeswoman said the university never awarded him a degree and a review of the school's database did not turn up a student by that name.
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