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NEWS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
Amid the three- and four-story, crumbling brick buildings on West Lexington Street, shoppers sift through racks of clothing on the sidewalk, hunt for bargains in bins of 88-cent paper towels at the Lot Store's closing sale and tote their purchases past mostly vacant, boarded or gated storefronts. A handbag and hat merchant moves buckets to catch rainwater dripping through his collapsed ceiling. Around the corner from the shuttered Greyhound bus station on West Fayette, the owner's son presides over an empty counter at Paul's Luncheonette.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | April 13, 2007
Plans for a new skyscraper for money manager Legg Mason and a Four Seasons Hotel and condos in Baltimore's Harbor East community passed one of the first hurdles yesterday, getting preliminary design approval from a city panel. That approval clears the way for the $600 million complex to go before the City Council for review, but still leaves a host of design issues to be resolved. Mayor Sheila Dixon is reportedly mulling a financial assistance package recommended by the city's economic development agency, which Harbor East's developer says is necessary for the project to move forward.
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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff | January 24, 1999
Positive economic signs are everywhere, from solvent governments to insolvent -- but gainfully employed -- consumers. But for striking evidence that the national prosperity is real, seeping even into bare corners, look at Baltimore and some other older cities.They're adding substantial numbers of jobs for the first time in nearly a decade.In November, the most recent month for which data are available, about 419,000 people were working in Baltimore. That's 6,000 more than in November 1997, closing in on almost a full year of substantial job gains for the city.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | October 18, 2006
The city and the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation are in talks to resolve a standoff over the long-stalled "superblock," a six-block area critical to west-side redevelopment, a city official confirmed yesterday. A deal would avert a court fight over the city's planned condemnation of property owned by one of its largest charitable foundations. City Solicitor Ralph S. Tyler said he has been leading negotiations with the Baltimore nonprofit over its properties in the superblock and moving ahead with the project, viewed as a key link between Charles Center to the east and the University of Maryland complex to the west.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2003
After overcoming a lawsuit, a late-night injunction and a partial loss of financing, Baltimore's long-delayed Marriott Residence Inn is to formally break ground today in the central business district, more than four years after the project was first proposed. The 15-story tower, planned for the southeast corner of Redwood and Light streets, will feature 188 units and be Baltimore's first hotel built for extended stays. "It's been a long time coming," said Kevin M. Urgo, senior vice president of Urgo Hotels, a Bethesda developer.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1996
NOW THAT city and state officials have found a way to reopen the entire length of Howard Street to automobile traffic, they could help revitalize the corridor even more by moving ahead with another long-awaited project: construction of artists' housing.Nearly a year has passed since Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke dubbed Howard Street the "Avenue of the Arts," and a nonprofit group affiliated with the city sought proposals from developers who wanted to build apartments and galleries that could provide the beginning of a self-sufficient arts community.
NEWS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1996
Hilton Hotels Corp. wants to build a $105 million luxury hotel near the Inner Harbor, the third such project proposed downtown in recent months.At the same time, the developer of Inner Harbor East, on the waterfront south of Little Italy, intends to construct $35 million worth of office and retail space and a new suites-style hotel beginning in the spring.Like proposals for upscale hotels on Pratt Street by Westin Hotels & Resorts and the Cordish Co., Hilton's interest in building 700 hotel rooms at Inner Harbor East stems from increased tourism and room demand expected to be generated by the recently completed $150 million expansion of the Baltimore Convention Center.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | December 22, 1994
With the rebricking of Main Street set to begin in March, Annapolis officials and merchants are joining to make sure the construction project doesn't unduly harm business in the city's historic district."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | October 18, 2006
The city and the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation are in talks to resolve a standoff over the long-stalled "superblock," a six-block area critical to west-side redevelopment, a city official confirmed yesterday. A deal would avert a court fight over the city's planned condemnation of property owned by one of its largest charitable foundations. City Solicitor Ralph S. Tyler said he has been leading negotiations with the Baltimore nonprofit over its properties in the superblock and moving ahead with the project, viewed as a key link between Charles Center to the east and the University of Maryland complex to the west.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2003
Baltimore could get a Hilton, a Westin or another large hotel next to the city's convention center by 2006, according to development teams that include such heavyweights as actor Will Smith and Black Entertainment Television founder Robert L. Johnson in proposals submitted yesterday. The bids will be reviewed and a development team chosen in coming months by the Baltimore Development Corp., the city's economic development arm that requested the proposals for a city-owned parcel between the Camden Yards sports complex and the Baltimore Convention Center.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
Developers are proposing projects ranging from a mix of condominiums, shops and restaurants to a biomedical research facility to a Red Roof Inn for five mostly vacant properties scattered across downtown Baltimore's west side. The city has received 11 proposals from developers, the city's economic development agency said yesterday. The Baltimore Development Corp. had requested proposals in April to revitalize a total of seven scattered sites in the once-struggling neighborhood. The properties, all city-owned, are near planned redevelopment projects or in blocks where new private investment is occurring, city officials said.
NEWS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
Amid the three- and four-story, crumbling brick buildings on West Lexington Street, shoppers sift through racks of clothing on the sidewalk, hunt for bargains in bins of 88-cent paper towels at the Lot Store's closing sale and tote their purchases past mostly vacant, boarded or gated storefronts. A handbag and hat merchant moves buckets to catch rainwater dripping through his collapsed ceiling. Around the corner from the shuttered Greyhound bus station on West Fayette, the owner's son presides over an empty counter at Paul's Luncheonette.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2005
A telemarketer will open two call centers in Maryland, the state said yesterday, bringing 200 jobs to Baltimore and another 200 to Prince George's County. Civic Development Group, based in Edison, N.J., has leased 10,000 square feet of space at 1100 Wicomico St. in the city and nearly as much office space in Largo. It expects to create the 400 full-time jobs over the next two years, according to the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development. Company officials could not be reached for comment yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2005
City officials, armed with the power of condemnation, are moving to breathe new life into the former Chesapeake Restaurant and other long-vacant properties at the gateway to the Charles North neighborhood, part of the city's arts district near Penn Station and the Charles Theater. Baltimore Development Corp. said yesterday that it is seeking proposals from developers to transform the former landmark restaurant at 1701-1709 N. Charles St., a parking lot and two vacant townhouses around the corner on East Lanvale Street.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2003
MOVE over, PILOTs. Make way for TIFs. In the acronymic world of Baltimore's economic development, tax increment financing bonds are supplanting payments in lieu of taxes as a subsidy of choice. The city is poised to approve its fourth TIF bond - which pledges expected additional property tax revenues from a specific project, not current tax dollars, to pay off the debt - in seven months. This one is to fund $5.5 million worth of improvements to spur the conversion of the mostly vacant 19th-century factory Clipper Mill site in Woodberry in North Baltimore into a $55 million residential and office community.
FEATURES
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2003
He hardly looks like one of the most powerful people in Baltimore. A jovial, elfin man with gray hair, he doesn't wear fancy suits, run in elite circles or live in a big house. He doesn't even use a briefcase, lugging his voluminous files under one arm wherever he goes. Yet as head of the city's economic development agency, M.J. "Jay" Brodie wields major influence over his hometown's look and feel, and has for many years. Right now he is shaping one of the biggest city projects in years, and one of the biggest in his 40-year career.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | August 8, 1995
Baltimore, which has been on the losing end of many economic contests recently, won one yesterday when a California-based printing company announced it would move its corporate headquarters here.Treasure Chest Advertising Inc., the nation's largest printer of advertising circulars, currently based in Glendora, Calif., will bring about 25 executives and support workers to downtown Baltimore by October, said company President Donald E. Roland.The privately held company, with 4,000 employees and 17 printing plants nationwide, had sales of more than $900 million in the fiscal year that ended June 30, Mr. Roland said.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1996
Return the phone calls, M. Jay Brodie admonishes his people. Get the little stuff right. Push the sanitation department to install sidewalk trash cans for the litter-bound merchant. Help the guy who needs a zoning change."Of such great things is economic development made," says Brodie, the president of Baltimore Development Corp. since January. "I'm not being facetious."He's really not.BDC, the city's economic development agency, was bashed in the past for getting the little stuff wrong -- for ignoring messages, losing paperwork and failing to help its main customers, Baltimore's businesses.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2003
After overcoming a lawsuit, a late-night injunction and a partial loss of financing, Baltimore's long-delayed Marriott Residence Inn is to formally break ground today in the central business district, more than four years after the project was first proposed. The 15-story tower, planned for the southeast corner of Redwood and Light streets, will feature 188 units and be Baltimore's first hotel built for extended stays. "It's been a long time coming," said Kevin M. Urgo, senior vice president of Urgo Hotels, a Bethesda developer.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2003
The city has pursued a convention headquarters hotel for years to attract more business to its underperforming convention center. Now, after a bidding process that ended Monday, it has three proposals to choose from. So how will it make its selection? All met requirements for the number of hotel rooms and meeting and parking spaces on the city-owned site just west of the convention center. One team boasts a Hollywood celebrity, one a nationally prominent businessman, the third well-known local business people.
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