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By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 20, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Describing the national capital's financial condition as "extremely serious," a special commission recommended yesterday that the city be authorized to tax the incomes of non-residents who work here or that the federal government more than double its annual contribution to Washington's municipal budget.The panel further recommended that the District of Columbia's government work force of 48,000 -- which takes half the city's budget to maintain -- be slashed by 6,000.It also proposed creation of a metropolitan-area transportation authority to improve the area's roads and bridges.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
Baltimore students will continue receiving free bus passes next year, after the city school board voted this week to dip into its rainy-day fund to support the program. On Tuesday, the board approved transferring $2.15 million from the school system's $8.5 million contingency fund to continue providing passes for student transportation, which until this year were supported by the city's budget. The city schools' budget director, Michael Frist, said drawing money from the contingency fund was the only way to come up with the money for the bus passes.
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NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2000
The fanfare and smiles that accompanied last week's delivery of a 500-page report on Baltimore city government are gone. Now comes the hard part. There are scores of recommendations for improving management and efficiency that, if adopted, could save Baltimore as much as $135 million a year, according to the report by the Greater Baltimore Committee and Presidents' Roundtable. But there are few quick fixes - and many obstacles. The city's big spenders, the public works and housing agencies, would have to make fundamental changes in the way they operate.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
At a community forum led by City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young on Wednesday night, residents expressed concerns over a variety of issues, including the parks and recreation department. The group of about 60 residents gathered in the Baltimore City Community College's Liberty Campus auditorium to ask a panel of city officials about issues including blighted houses, dirt bike laws, attracting new retail businesses to their neighborhoods and the potential closure of city recreation centers.
NEWS
April 2, 2002
THE GOOD NEWS is that Baltimore's property tax revenues, fueled by strong home sales, are rising. But property taxes raise only 28.7 percent of the city's revenues. In fact, 34.5 percent of Baltimore's $1.7 billion annual operating budget comes from the state and federal governments. Both are slashing aid, due to recent bad economic times. The modest growth in local revenues will not compensate for those cuts. This is the bleak picture Mayor Martin O'Malley faces in preparing the city's budget for the fiscal year starting in July.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2002
The Westminster Common Council adopted last night a $21.9 million budget for fiscal 2003 that includes the city's first tax increase in five years - 4.8 cents - and $2.5 million for the long-awaited Longwell parking garage. "When you take the [Longwell] garage out, there's been very little real growth in our budget, only $100,000 over last year's" budget, said Councilman L. Gregory Pecoraro, finance committee chairman. The city's budget for the next fiscal year, which begins July 1, includes money for day-to-day operations, its building program and water and sewer funds.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Liz F. Kay and Julie Scharper and Liz F. Kay , julie.scharper@baltsun.com and liz.Kay@baltsun.com | December 12, 2009
State leaders and the Baltimore City Council president joined the call Friday for an end to rolling closures of firefighting companies aimed at trimming overtime costs. "If ending the rotating closures saves one person's life, it's worth it," said Del. Curt Anderson, who, along with several other state lawmakers, discussed the closures during a meeting about the city's budget woes with Mayor Sheila Dixon. Since July, shift commanders have chosen five units to close each day to shave overtime costs from the department's budget.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
Most City Council members agreed last week that the city's worsening financial situation merits budget cuts, but they're not sure Mayor Sheila Dixon's list of $36.5 million in proposals is the best way to close the gap. Some want Dixon's office to take more of a direct hit from the spending reductions. Others believe the city should look at dipping into its rainy day fund to make up the shortfall. Councilman Bernard C. "Jack" Young, chairman of the budget and appropriations committee, said that next year he would like to shelve the mayor's Office of Neighborhoods, the Office of Criminal Justice, the CitiStat program, her homelessness programs and the planned Office of Sustainability.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 3, 2005
Emboldened by the projected budget surplus, Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke introduced legislation yesterday to repeal the city's $3.50 monthly tax on residential, land-line telephones. Clarke found little support for the bill among council members, and President Sheila Dixon and Vice President Stephanie C. Rawlings Blake indicated their opposition. The phone tax was implemented last summer as part of Mayor Martin O'Malley's package of new taxes needed to close a substantial budget deficit.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | September 23, 2009
Baltimore plans to lay off 27 employees and contract workers, including a Fire Department commander, to help plug a hole in the city's budget created by declining tax revenues, according to a draft agenda for today's Board of Estimates meeting. "Everybody is feeling this," Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon said Tuesday. "No one is not a part of this." The layoffs would come from six agencies and, along with a proposed citywide furlough plan and other spending reductions, will be presented to the city's spending panel for approval on Wednesday.
NEWS
May 14, 2010
Baltimore is staring at a $121 million budget shortfall for the coming fiscal year that threatens to force layoffs in the police department, closures of fire stations, drastic cuts to recreation and parks, furlough days, an end to bulk trash pickup and all manner of other reductions in vital city services. Things will only get worse if the city can't enact reforms to its pension system for police and firefighters. Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake, to her credit, has not shied away from the enormity of the problems and has tried at every turn to convey the message that the city's budget is in dire shape and will require plenty of uncomfortable decisions.
NEWS
By Nicole Harris-Crest | April 5, 2010
A mid a suffering economy and budget cuts that threaten public safety and recreation, Baltimore residents must take an active and aggressive approach to cope with the city's economic woes. I am saddened and outraged to hear of proposed cuts to police, fire and recreation budgets. I know firsthand the importance of public safety and support systems for youth, as almost two years ago three teenagers were charged with fatally shooting my father, former Councilman Kenneth N. Harris Sr. My father's death taught me that anyone can become a victim of crime.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie-scharper@baltsun.com | January 14, 2010
It was the first day of the Maryland General Assembly session, but as Baltimore City Council president and soon-to-be-mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake wove through the aisles Wednesday, it seemed more like a family reunion. The legislators hugged, kissed and all but pinched the cheeks of Rawlings-Blake, daughter of the late Del. Howard P. Rawlings, a State House legend. Some reminisced about her childhood, when she tailed her father through the hallways. Many assured Rawlings-Blake that her father was beaming down from heaven.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 10, 2010
As the daughter of a renowned state legislator and a member of the Baltimore City Council for nearly her entire adult life, Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake has seen the city transform in the hands of numerous leaders. On Feb. 4, when she is sworn in as the city's 49th mayor, she gets her own chance to shepherd the city into a new era. A falling homicide rate, rising public school enrollments and a flourishing arts scene bring hope for brighter times, but Rawlings-Blake inherits a city beset by a colossal budget crisis, vacancies at the top of key agencies and a murder rate still among the highest in the nation.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Liz F. Kay and Julie Scharper and Liz F. Kay , julie.scharper@baltsun.com and liz.Kay@baltsun.com | December 12, 2009
State leaders and the Baltimore City Council president joined the call Friday for an end to rolling closures of firefighting companies aimed at trimming overtime costs. "If ending the rotating closures saves one person's life, it's worth it," said Del. Curt Anderson, who, along with several other state lawmakers, discussed the closures during a meeting about the city's budget woes with Mayor Sheila Dixon. Since July, shift commanders have chosen five units to close each day to shave overtime costs from the department's budget.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | September 23, 2009
Baltimore plans to lay off 27 employees and contract workers, including a Fire Department commander, to help plug a hole in the city's budget created by declining tax revenues, according to a draft agenda for today's Board of Estimates meeting. "Everybody is feeling this," Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon said Tuesday. "No one is not a part of this." The layoffs would come from six agencies and, along with a proposed citywide furlough plan and other spending reductions, will be presented to the city's spending panel for approval on Wednesday.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1996
Although a windfall insurance refund is helping Baltimore close a $31 million gap in its current budget year, the city's budget director is warning that the financial picture for the 1997 budget year, which begins July 1, has not improved.In a memo Friday, Budget Director Edward J. Gallagher told heads of city agencies that they should continue to plan to meet budget targets that include reductions ranging from several hundred thousand to several million dollars."Nothing has changed regarding budget actions to be taken by agencies," Mr. Gallagher said.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | April 17, 1991
A $9.9 million state grant and a wage freeze helped the city to avoid layoffs and cuts in services, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said today as next year's $2.07 billion billion budget was presented to the Board of Estimates.The mayor thanked city employee unions for agreeing to the wage freeze, which saved $38.1 million. Schmoke said the state takeover of the City Jail "will help us tremendously down the road.""Now we need to work with the General Assembly as it looks at restructuring the state's tax system," he said.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | June 3, 2009
The water main breaks that closed major Baltimore streets and disrupted rail service in April also washed away sizable chunks the city's budget. Fixing the 20-inch main that ruptured at Gay and Lombard streets on April 28 cost $222,523, according to figures from the city's finance department. That does not include thousands of dollars in police and fire overtime, or the lost work of city employees sent home because there was no water service in their buildings. The city spent $69,258 to repair another water main break the next day, when a 36-inch pipe burst in Halethorpe and delayed Amtrak service on the eastern seaboard.
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