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NEWS
January 9, 2013
Baltimore City Solicitor George Nilson appears to have shot down a proposal to require businesses that receive large city contracts or tax breaks from City Hall to hire local residents for 51 percent of new jobs they create. Last week, Mr. Nilson said the bill could violate a section of the U.S. Constitution barring discrimination against job-seekers based on where they live. But the bill's sponsor, City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young, insists the measure is needed to address the city's stubbornly high unemployment rate.
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NEWS
October 6, 2014
I have visited a lot of major cities in my lifetime, but until now I was never inclined to email or write a letter to the editor of the city newspaper to comment about the city and its people. From a recent visit I had to Baltimore, I have found that you have some of the nicest, friendliest and most helpful people I have ever encountered. In particular I owe a debt of gratitude to a gentleman named Mark who helped my wife and I when we got stranded at the train station trying to see the Orioles' last home game.
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NEWS
July 16, 2013
The chasm between the Baltimore City Police Department and city residents seems to be widening ("Batts shakes up police top ranks," July 10). The only way out is simple: The police need to increase their communication with those whom they serve. For the citizens, it's all about opening up and cooperating with the police. Snitching is highly encouraged if is to the betterment of the community. Blood is flowing in our streets this summer. But police cannot do their jobs if witnesses do not come forward.
NEWS
August 12, 2014
Police Commissioner Anthony Batts may have the single toughest job in the United States. Each small victory for the police department is trumped by more outrageous acts of ugly violence. A city weeps and prays for the family of a slain three year old ( "Family and friends mourn 3-year-old Baltimore girl killed by gunfire," Aug. 8). Incredible, it is life (and death) as we know it in Baltimore. It seems as if we have become inured to the astonishing numbers of lives lost. Once again, our city has become a cesspool of murder, recklessness and a lack of mores or values that are instilled in most of us. The especially pathetic thing is that city residents are being defined by the few cowards who choose to make our streets so frighteningly dangerous.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
A year ago, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake gave an inaugural address that was both lofty in vision and grounded in reality - the poetry of growing Baltimore by 10,000 residents in the next decade tempered by the prose of how to get there. "We must focus on the fundamentals and do them well," the newly elected mayor said, "or face the prospect of trying to do everything - most of it poorly. " But as Rawlings-Blake concludes her first year as elected mayor, having previously served the final two years of her predecessor's term, her administration has faltered on some of those fundamentals.
NEWS
June 6, 2013
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake justifies over $100 million in taxpayer-funded property tax subsidies for the developers of Harbor Point on the grounds that the development will bring jobs to Baltimore ("Mayor: Project means jobs," June 4). But if those employees don't live in the city, the outcome will leave city taxpayers out $100 million, living with the traffic and congestion as employees drive to work and the county enjoys the income tax revenue. Here's a modest suggestion: Tie developer property tax subsidies to the number of those employed in the development who pay income taxes as Baltimore City residents but did not file as city residents the previous year.
BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
Dozens of Baltimore residents walked into Upton's Union Baptist Church Sunday. They were dressed fastidiously in dark suits and dark dresses. Their eyes turned toward the stage where they saw an odd sight for a house of worship: A gambling advertisement and an oversize pair of red dice. Horseshoe Baltimore's local hiring efforts stretched into church Sunday afternoon as part of a 14-district tour of Baltimore to try to hire city residents for the casino's 1,700 jobs. Rev. Alvin C. Hathaway, Sr. acknowledged the unusual pairing of a casino with a church, but he said churches have a duty to help their community members obtain employment.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2011
Employment, increased funding for youth programs and a living wage were a few of the reforms city residents demanded of City Council members during public meeting Wednesday evening. Before the annual "Taxpayers' Night" at the War Memorial Building, where council members hear comments on the mayor's preliminary budget, many residents rallied against cuts to after-school programs, recreation centers and other youth services. Although the City Council does not have the authority to allocate spending, residents took the opportunity to voice their objections to the mayor's budget, which trimmed $65 million from the city's $1.29 billion operating budget to balance expenditures and revenue.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
In her inaugural address Tuesday, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake exhorted Baltimoreans to "pitch in and do their part" to improve the city and draw new residents despite economic challenges. Speaking in a light rain outside City Hall, Rawlings-Blake, 41, urged residents to draw inspiration from civil rights leaders of her parents' generation to summon a "sense of urgency and collective sacrifice for a greater purpose. " "Citizenship is an opportunity and a duty in which everyone contributes to and benefits from a greater good," she said.
NEWS
October 25, 2003
Baltimore residents can drop off hazardous household materials today and tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Polytechnic Institute parking lot at Falls Road and Cold Spring Lane. The city schedules centralized collection of unwanted toxic substances twice a year, in the fall and spring. Eligible items - which will not be collected from homes - include pesticides, batteries, gasoline, pool chemicals, bleach, herbicides and drain cleaners. Proof of city residency is required to drop off material.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Horseshoe Casino Baltimore's general manager said Tuesday that joint efforts by his company and the city government to recruit local employees for the new gambling center near downtown have paid off, as Baltimore residents have received about half of the 2,200 job offers made so far. It is not clear how many city residents would be hired for the facility's 1,700 to 1,900 full- and part-time jobs because the job offers were made pending background checks...
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske | May 14, 2014
If you go the Preakness this weekend, odds are you'll recognize the voice calling the race. That's because the voice belongs to Dave Rodman, who has called the Preakness - and every other horse race at Baltimore's Pimlico Race Course, except when he was sick or on vacation - every year since 1991. "I've never really put a number to it," said Rodman, when asked to estimate how many races he's called. "I'm not trying to break any world records or anything. " Perhaps not. But Rodman, who moved to North Laurel when he got the Pimlico job 23 years ago and now lives in Ellicott City, already has secured a place among the nation's elite horse racing announcers.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
Ron Sanchez's roots in horse racing go deep into his childhood in Caracas, Venezuela, where his maternal grandmother took him to the races every weekend at La Rinconada, the country's largest and oldest track. "I was five years old and we'd walk all the way to the track, it's like two miles," Sanchez recalled Monday at Pimlico. "I fall in love [with horse racing]. Once you get here [to the race track], it's impossible to get out. " Though Sanchez also dreamed of becoming a major league baseball player - he was a member of the Venezuelan national team in his late teens and said he "almost signed" a pro contract - the love of racing never left.
NEWS
By Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Chad Barnhill | May 6, 2014
When Horseshoe Casino Baltimore opens later this year, it will serve as more than just a proud new gateway to downtown Baltimore. The $442-million casino entertainment facility will create 1,700 new jobs downtown - infusing new tax revenue into the community and lowering property taxes for city residents. As the city's largest new employer, Horseshoe Baltimore will offer access to the good-paying jobs and sustainable careers that are essential to achieving this administration's goal of attracting 10,000 new families to Baltimore.
NEWS
May 5, 2014
The collapse of East 26th Street amid this week's downpour and the years of concern that residents relayed to various city officials, as reported by reporters Kevin Rector, Yvonne Wenger and Joe Burris , confirms the ongoing widespread belief that Baltimore City officials have a long history of persistent unresponsiveness to citizen concerns ( "Displaced residents blame city, railroad for inaction," May 2). The list of embarrassments goes on and on from collapsing streets to skirting departmental audits and the erroneous speed cameras, just to name a few. Regardless of who ultimately bears legal responsibility for this incident, be it the city, CSX or both, it is important that all Baltimoreans remember this incident as a representation of how the vast majority of city officials treat citizen concerns the next time they find themselves in a voting booth.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake has declined to fund a proposed East Baltimore job-training program backed by an influential community group, sparking a war of words over whether City Hall is doing enough to help the unemployed. The interfaith coalition Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development says its leaders have a proposal to provide 50 members of the Oliver neighborhood with jobs and want $594,000 in funding over three years from the Rawlings-Blake administration. The program would target ex-offenders and others chronically unemployed.
NEWS
July 10, 2007
Baltimore residents can now pay several city bills online using their personal checking accounts or credit cards, according to city officials. To make a payment, go to www.baltimorecity.gov and click on "online payments." Paying by electronic check is free; there is a service fee for using credit cards. Residents can pay online for property taxes, water bills, parking fines, red-light citations and several other payments. Residents will need their bank account and routing numbers. E-mail questions to BaltimoreCi tyCollections@baltimorecity.
BUSINESS
By PHILIP MOELLER and PHILIP MOELLER,SUN BUSINESS EDITOR | January 30, 1991
People may not go to the polls much anymore, but they still vote. Mostly, they vote with their pocketbooks, and, when things get really serious, they vote with their feet.And, despite all the attention lavished on politicians and elective office, the economic votes in our capitalist system -- cast in our roles as consumers, employees and residents -- have usually meant a lot more than those made at local polling places. The quality of our daily lives, for better or worse, is largely a result of these individual, market-based decisions.
NEWS
By Brandi Bottalico, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Baltimore City's Household Hazardous Waste collection events begin April 4 and will continue every month on the first Friday and immediately following Saturday through October, Public Works Director Rudolph S. Chow announced Monday. City residents can dispose of hazardous household materials, such as pesticides, herbicides, car and household batteries, drain cleaners, oil-based paint and gasoline, according to a department of public works press release. Asbestos, ammunition, fire extinguishers, industrial and medical wastes and radioactive materials will not be accepted.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | March 10, 2014
Units from Howard County's Department of Rescue Services responded to a structure fire at an Ellicott City residence on Saturday night, according to the department's Facebook page.  The Facebook post said the fire, which occurred at a home in the in the 3800 block of Woodville Lane in Ellicott City, appeared to have originated on the exterior and extended into the second floor and attic. No injuries were reported, according to the post.  No assistance from the Red Cross was required, according to the post.  #sigshell { padding: 10px; float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
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