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By Audrey Haar and Audrey Haar,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
Ocean City -- Ocean City continues to attract a wave of tourists, but the real estate market is stagnant.The tourists are still coming to the seashore but their visits are less frequent and shorter. And when it rains weekend after weekend, as it did last year, people aren't inclined to stay even for a vacation, much less to buy a home.In addition, the sluggish economy has taken a toll."The economy is always a factor for us because we are a second-home market. We are the first ones to be cut out," says Barry Weir, president of the Ocean City Association of Realtors and sales manager of English Realty in Ocean Pines.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Like the sound of a Greek Revival mansion with an "amazing view"? Want to own a "piece of Baltimore history"? Willing to look beyond a "scarred exterior"? Baltimore Housing has launched a marketing campaign for a select group of so-called "eclectic" properties owned by the city, in an effort to highlight the value hidden in the sea of roughly 1,000 vacant buildings it has listed for sale. The 18 sites, drawn from across the city, include the 1838 Upton Mansion, two former schools, two firehouses, a brick warehouse, and a one-time library, as well as some vacant lots open for new construction and several blocks of rowhouses traditionally associated with the Vacants to Value program.
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NEWS
August 2, 1997
THE SADDEST PART about a dispute concerning a stable in Graham Memorial Park is that the operator apparently has been using the property without paying rent to the city for seven years. It is another episode in the continuing story of Baltimore's inept management of its properties. The real estate division of the comptroller's office has tried to get more control of the situation, but has been stymied by the various other departments that are separately responsible for city-owned buildings and property.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | January 13, 2010
Office vacancies in the Baltimore area climbed to the highest level in at least 15 years in 2009, when demand for space fell as businesses scaled back or put expansions on hold. And industry insiders warn that commercial foreclosures will likely rise in the coming months. About one-fifth of the city's office space is vacant. The vacancy rate rose to 18.8 percent in the fourth quarter, a sharp increase from 12 percent at the end of 2008 - and higher than during the last recession in 2001, according to Cushman & Wakefield, a top commercial real estate firm in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1997
The city's economic development agency has received six proposals to lease and manage a 20-story office building acquired as part of a deal to keep Legg Mason Inc.'s headquarters downtown, it announced yesterday.The Baltimore Development Corp. intends to select a winner to handle 7 E. Redwood St. -- a job that could pay roughly $500,000 in commissions and fees -- by the middle of next month."We want to move quickly on this selection because as the building empties, our exposure grows," said M. J. "Jay" Brodie, BDC's president.
NEWS
June 2, 1997
IT SHOULDN'T TAKE passage of a Baltimore City Council resolution to force compilation of a list of all buildings and lots the city has acquired over the years. Such a resolution was introduced last November by Councilwoman Helen L. Holton, but Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke promised then that he would have such a list ready to hand over to the comptroller by year's end. Five months after the mayor's self-imposed deadline, he still hasn't done so. So Ms. Holton's pending resolution may yet be passed.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2005
Q: An 87-year-old owner of a $72 ground rent on property in Baltimore writes that she has received "much mail" about the ground rent from the city's Real Estate Department during "the last year or so." She complains that she has "not collected any ground rent or been paid for my ground rent" and asks me to review some of the papers the city sent her and advise if the city's actions are legal. A: The reason you haven't been receiving ground rent is that the city acquired title and possession to your property months ago by a court proceeding.
NEWS
March 30, 1996
TO REALLY UNDERSTAND the importance of the real estate office job that Comptroller Joan M. Pratt gave to her "male friend" Julius Henson, you ought to go back a few years.In 1993, millionaire baker John Paterakis bought the 18-story Munsey Building at a bargain price, $450,000, figuring the state government headed by his friend, Gov. William Donald Schaefer, needed rental space. But when the state looked elsewhere, Mr. Paterakis offered to rent the building to the city for its Civil Service Commission and other agencies.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | June 20, 2009
John E. Hentschel, former head of the city's real estate office who later worked for the Department of Public Works, died June 12 of cancer at the Pickersgill retirement community in Towson. He was 91. Mr. Hentschel, the son of a machinist and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised near Aisquith and Eden streets. When he was 14, he joined the Marianists, and later worked as a schoolteacher in San Francisco and Dayton, Ohio, where he earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Dayton in 1944.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1996
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke swatted down yesterday a proposal from the comptroller's office that would have required city agencies to provide more details on the purchase and sale of properties.The proposal, drafted by real estate officer Anthony J. Ambridge, was defeated by a 3-2 vote of the Board of Estimates. Schmoke and two of his appointees, City Solicitor Neal M. Janey and Director of Public Works George G. Balog, voted against the measure. Comptroller Joan M. Pratt and City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III voted for it.The proposal was the latest attempt by Pratt to increase oversight of city real estate transactions.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | June 20, 2009
John E. Hentschel, former head of the city's real estate office who later worked for the Department of Public Works, died June 12 of cancer at the Pickersgill retirement community in Towson. He was 91. Mr. Hentschel, the son of a machinist and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised near Aisquith and Eden streets. When he was 14, he joined the Marianists, and later worked as a schoolteacher in San Francisco and Dayton, Ohio, where he earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Dayton in 1944.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2005
Q: An 87-year-old owner of a $72 ground rent on property in Baltimore writes that she has received "much mail" about the ground rent from the city's Real Estate Department during "the last year or so." She complains that she has "not collected any ground rent or been paid for my ground rent" and asks me to review some of the papers the city sent her and advise if the city's actions are legal. A: The reason you haven't been receiving ground rent is that the city acquired title and possession to your property months ago by a court proceeding.
TOPIC
By Michael Milleman and Michael Milleman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2003
William H. Murphy Sr., who died 10 days ago, will be remembered for many extraordinary achievements. But, the people of Baltimore will miss him most as a judge. For more than three decades, Judge Murphy was the people's judge. I use the term "people's judge" reluctantly because the television caricatures of "people's court" judges - anti-judges, really - have corrupted the term. In its true sense, "people's judge" describes Judge Murphy. In 1970, the people elected him to Baltimore's Municipal Court, the predecessor of today's District Court.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2003
A federal judge sentenced a former Maryland man to 30 months in prison yesterday for his role in a fraud scheme in which he and co-defendants illegally flipped more than 100 Baltimore houses over a 3 1/2 -year period. Glenn Rosofsky, 37, now of Encinitas, Calif., had pleaded guilty in January to two counts of mail fraud. He and his three co-defendants, who also entered guilty pleas, admitted that they bilked mortgage lenders out of as much as $2.5 million. They bought low-cost city houses and sold them to aspiring landlord-investors for more than they were worth, using falsified documents and inflated appraisals to get mortgages for their buyers.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2001
Sterling Alphacanos Johnson Sr., a real estate broker and educator, died of cancer Wednesday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 83 and lived in Morgan Park. A teacher and later a jobs counselor in the city's Department of Education, Mr. Johnson established and ran a North Avenue real estate business for many years. Born in Baltimore and raised on Dolphin Street, he began delivering the Afro-American newspaper when he was 9. He then worked for a grocer and a furrier and helped at the post office.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2001
Eight months and two real estate officers later, Comptroller Joan M. Pratt announced yesterday that she has hired a new man to fill the position. Joseph A. Wesolowski, 44, started work Monday, replacing John D. Hubble, who left the office in June to return to the private sector. Hubble took over as acting real estate officer after Pratt fired Anthony J. Ambridge in January because she said she wanted change. Yesterday, Pratt said that she tapped Wesolowski, the former treasurer for the Hanover-based CompuDyne Corp.
NEWS
December 30, 1996
SOME THINGS are accomplished faster when government is not involved. Government, with its regulations and bureaucracy, can slow down business that must not be delayed.That's why the city created quasi-public agencies such as Charles Center-Inner Harbor Management Corp. and Baltimore Economic Development Corp. That's why four years ago those entities were merged to form Baltimore Development Corp.The public wants the efficiency and speed a BDC provides, even if it means losing the ability to scrutinize the semi-private agency with the same degree of authority as City Hall agencies.
NEWS
April 13, 1996
IT MADE NO SENSE for Comptroller Joan M. Pratt to hire her former campaign manager, Julius Henson, to run the city real estate office. She's not the first public official to find a job in City Hall for a friend. But the post she gave Mr. Henson is too important to Baltimore to entrust to someone who so obviously lacks the right training and background.Mr. Henson has shown considerable talent when it comes to running a political campaign. Let him find some other endeavor to remain occupied and financially secure until the next election opportunity presents itself.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1999
If publisher John Wiley & Sons Inc. decides to move its corporate headquarters from New York to Baltimore, it would have several very different projects downtown from which to choose for its new offices.The publishing house is evaluating a skyscraper planned at 1 Light St., a 20-acre tract east of the Inner Harbor, a vacant soap-making plant in South Baltimore and a proposed 17-story office tower at 414 Water St., according to sources with knowledge of the company's search.If John Wiley were to relocate its headquarters and about 900 employees downtown, it would mark one of the largest corporate relocations in the city's history, dwarfing a 1996 move by Sylvan Learnings Systems Inc. that brought with it 250 jobs.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 8, 1997
A few thousand words have been written about Big John Hotel, the Wyndham at Inner Harbor East. You know the mostly negative rap by now: It's too far from Baltimore's convention hub, it could become a casino some day, the financial deal is bad for the city and a windfall for John Paterakis and his partners, the hotel's scale violates the long-term development plan for the area. This endgame summation, one of many received by TJI, came in from a citizen named Donna Zebe:"The greatest result of this is the loss of confidence and trust by citizens of this community in the ability of city government to represent us. This holds up to the harsh light of day the fact that if you are wealthy and politically well-connected you can cram down the throats of the citizens anything that you like."
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