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NEWS
June 1, 2005
Mable T. George, a retired city public schools worker and soup kitchen volunteer, died of heart failure May 25 at her Sutton Place apartment. The former longtime resident of Reservoir Hill was 86. Born in Lee County, S.C., she moved to South Baltimore with her family in 1930. She attended St. Monica's parochial school, and during World War II was an administrator at the Curtis Bay Ordnance Depot. Miss George was a custodian and food worker in city schools for 30 years. She retired in 1983 from Edgecombe Circle Elementary, where she had spent most of her career, family members said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Vincent J. Salkoski, who taught mathematics in Baltimore public schools and was a World War II veteran, died Sept. 3 of heart disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 88. Vincent Joseph Salkoski was born in Baltimore and raised in Curtis Bay, where he was a member of the Curtis Bay Athletic Club. After graduating from Southern High School in 1944, he enlisted in the Marine Corps and served as a rifleman and mortarman. He participated in the occupation of China. After being discharged in 1946, he took courses at City College and the Johns Hopkins University to receive his teaching certification.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2004
Vernon S. Vavrina, a retired city public schools deputy superintendent who helped establish Baltimore's first school for unwed mothers, died of cancer Sunday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. A resident of Oak Crest Village for the past eight years, he formerly lived in Pikesville. He was 90. Dr. Vavrina began teaching in 1931 and was paid $120 a month. Assigned to Westport Elementary School in the southern section of the city, where several glass factories had closed because of the Depression, he later recounted his early experiences: "I vividly recall the children coming to school in hunger," he said in a 1975 Sun interview.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Cordelia D. Oliver, a retired Baltimore public schools educator who was one of the first African-American docents at the Baltimore Museum of Art , died Aug. 4 at Gilchrist Hospice care in Towson of complications from a stroke. She was 92. "Cordelia was a wonderful person, and if anyone met her, they were instantly drawn to her because of her personality," said Camay Calloway Murphy of Baltimore, former executive director of the Eubie Blake Cultural Center and onetime Baltimore school board member.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Mary L. Booker, who rose through the ranks from classroom teacher to principal while mentoring her peers, died Jan. 9 of multiple myeloma at her Hamilton home. She was 57. "Mary L. Booker was a consummate educator and administrator. She was my principal mentor when I was a new principal and generously shared her decades of experience and insight with me," said interim city schools CEO Tisha Edwards. "She devoted her life to the children of Baltimore," Ms. Edwards said. "Her career embodied the highest standards of professionalism with deep personal dedication to her students and colleagues.
SPORTS
November 5, 1992
One of the big advantages to the city public schools joining the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association this year was postseason play for the girls for the first time.After yesterday's introduction to the MPSSAA playoffs in girls soccer, the city schools might want to reconsider.Fourth seed Kenwood blistered supposed top seed City, 16-0, and Western, outshot 47-0 in the first half, was shut out, 11-0, at South Carroll.Of course, when basketball season rolls around . . .* See high school playoff coverage, 10-11D
NEWS
October 3, 1996
YOUR SEPT. 22 editorial, "Taking chances with children's lives," accuses Baltimore City public schools administrators of "cutting corners" and ignoring school maintenance problems. The editorial concludes that children's safety cannot be a top priority for the city public schools because "the school system maintenance budget has been cut from $62 million to $42 milion since last year."This conclusion is inaccurate for two reasons.The safety of children and staff is our top priority. In the schools and in the central office, we will continue to do all we can to prevent accidents such as the one that occurred at Hazelwood.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2000
The Woodbourne Center, one of Maryland's oldest nonprofit agencies, has filed for Chapter 11 reorganization, in a continuing attempt to grapple with $2 million in red ink. In April, the center and its supporting foundation laid off 66 employees - about a fifth of the staff - and closed eight programs to deal with the debt. For a time last fall, employees did not receive distributions to their 403(b) retirement plans, which operate like 401(k) plans. The Woodbourne Center Inc. started as an orphanage two centuries ago and is the fifth-oldest child-care agency in the country.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2004
Mervin Thompson, a retired city public school guidance counselor active in Northwest Baltimore social organizations, died of cardiac arrest Monday at Union Memorial Hospital. The Ashburton resident was 75. Born in Baltimore and raised on West Mosher Street, he was a 1946 Frederick Douglass High School graduate. He enlisted in the Army and operated radios while stationed in Hawaii, Guam and Japan. He then earned a history degree from what is now Morgan State University and later studied at the Johns Hopkins University, Loyola College, Rutgers University and the University of Delaware.
NEWS
By Marilyn McCraven and Marilyn McCraven,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1996
Diamonte Brown yesterday declared her team a sure bet to win next week's local competition that is part of a national academics contest for middle schools.However, the eighth-grader and 29 of her schoolmates at Roland Park Elementary/Middle School on Roland Avenue are not leaving their collective fate to chance. It's cram time until Wednesday.Marty Sharrow, a Roland Park team coach and administrator, won't predict victory for Wednesday's local finals, but he says the team has the makings of a winner.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Ollie M.J. Ray, whose career teaching in city public schools spanned nearly four decades, died Tuesday of heart failure at Northwest Hospital. She was 82. "They say teachers are born, and Ollie had not only the native ability to be a teacher but also the desire," said Hayyte Jackson, who was a college friend and later a colleague in Baltimore public schools. "She had a great love for children and young people, and wanted to see them receive their appropriate secular and Christian education," said Mrs. Jackson, who retired in 1993 from Windsor Hills Elementary School, where she had been principal.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
Josephine C. "Jo" Miller, a civic activist who was a member of the League of Women Voters for 50 years and a Baltimore City Zoning Board watchdog for the Citizens Planning and Housing Association, died March 22 of esophageal cancer at her Roland Park Place home. She was 84. The daughter of J. William Carlson, an electrical engineer, and Isabelle Young Carlson, a homemaker, the former Josephine Lois Carlson was born and raised in Kearny, N.J. After graduating in 1947 from Kearny High School, she earned a bachelor's degree in biology in 1951 from Wilson College in Chambersburg, Pa. She moved to Baltimore after college when she took a job as a research assistant at the James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2014
Mary D. Eddinger, a retired educator who had been a learning specialist and resource teacher at Roland Park Country School for nearly three decades, died Tuesday of dementia at Union Memorial Hospital. She was 76. "Mary was the most loving and kind teacher I've probably ever known. She was just wonderful," said Jean Waller Brune, who has been head of school at Roland Park Country since 1992. "She worked with kids who needed help in reading and study skills, and she helped them develop confidence in themselves," said Ms. Brune.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Mary L. Booker, who rose through the ranks from classroom teacher to principal while mentoring her peers, died Jan. 9 of multiple myeloma at her Hamilton home. She was 57. "Mary L. Booker was a consummate educator and administrator. She was my principal mentor when I was a new principal and generously shared her decades of experience and insight with me," said interim city schools CEO Tisha Edwards. "She devoted her life to the children of Baltimore," Ms. Edwards said. "Her career embodied the highest standards of professionalism with deep personal dedication to her students and colleagues.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2013
Mary C. Burke, a devoted churchgoer who taught in Baltimore public schools for more than 30 years, died Nov. 18 of lung cancer at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown. She was 78. "She was so good at what she did, working with the children," Marlene Jackson, who taught alongside Ms. Burke for several years in city elementary schools, said. "Oh yes, she was A-1. " Born Mary Ann White in New York City, Ms. Burke moved to Baltimore as a young girl. Her father, the Rev. Arthur White, founded the Cherry Hill United Methodist Church.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
Morton "Jerry" Baum, founder and executive director of the Fund for Educational Excellence and a retired clothing manufacturing executive who was a tireless champion of city public schools, died May 5 from complications of Parkinson's disease at his Roland Park home. He was 87. "I first met Jerry in the 1980s when he was executive director of the Fund for Educational Excellence," said Brian C. Rogers, chairman of T. Rowe Price, who had served as a member of the organization's board.
NEWS
March 31, 1993
Listeners to National Public Radio's acclaimed "Morning Edition" news program were pleasantly surprised earlier this week when the show broadcast a feature item about 22-year-old Cora Frost, a first-year teacher at Booker T. Washington Middle School in Baltimore. Ms. Frost came to the city public schools through an innovative program called "Teach for America," which puts bright liberal arts graduates to work in the classroom while they study for their teacher certification.The idea of hiring liberal arts graduates who may not have taken formal education courses in college has been a pet project of state school board president Robert C. Embry Jr., whose efforts were instrumental in bringing alternative teacher certification LTC programs to Maryland.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | September 21, 2008
THE PROBLEM: A sign in a Federal Hill school parking lot has been vandalized so that it includes obscene language but has remained in place for more than two years. THE BACKSTORY: Thanks to a prank more common to The Simpsons' Springfield than Baltimore, you might imagine that the parking rules were different for Baltimore's public school staff. Most drivers confirm their parking privileges in private lots by placing some sort of identification on their car - a decal, perhaps, or a tag hanging from a rearview mirror.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
Lynn Taylor Hebden, a Baltimore-born lyric soprano who headed the Peabody Preparatory Department for more than two decades and was also a member of the faculty of the Peabody Conservatory, died Sunday from complications of breast cancer at her Roland Park home. She was 84. "I always sought her advice and historical perspective. She always was very interested and wanted to know how people on the faculty she had known were doing," said Carolee Stewart, the preparatory school's dean.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
Charles H. Burkhardt Jr., a former Anne Arundel County construction worker, died Friday from complications of diabetes at his Pasadena home. He was 66. Born and raised in South Baltimore, Mr. Burkhardt attended city public schools. For more than 40 years until retiring in 2004 on a medical disability, he worked as a construction worker. "He retired from Danella Corp.," said his daughter, Kelly Latham Pizarro of Pasadena. "His nickname was 'Good Time Charlie.'" Mr. Burkhardt was an avid Ravens fan. He also enjoyed fishing and crabbing.
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