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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1999
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke signed the final budget of his 12-year tenure yesterday, restoring 74 planned layoffs, providing the largest school funding in city history and taking one last, $100,000 stab at the city's chief complaint: rats.The mayor's $1.8 billion spending plan for fiscal 2000 might best be described as the Houdini budget. Despite a dire fiscal outlook in which Schmoke called for the elimination of 575 city positions, Baltimore's 46th mayor worked a little last-minute budget magic with City Council leaders to find an extra $2.1 million.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2013
More than a year ago, Maryland's assessments agency acknowledged making chronic miscalculations on certain tax breaks for big commercial properties in Baltimore - errors that cost the city more than $1.5 million in potential taxes. On July 6, 2012, a state official emailed the city information necessary to revise tax bills for several properties, which the state concluded had received unduly steep discounts following historic rehabilitations. A year later, the city Finance Department says it has not issued any revised bills to correct the errors.
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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2000
The city Board of Estimates yesterday approved a 20-year city tax break to developers renovating downtown's Congress Hotel. In addition to being exempt from paying $38,500 in city property taxes over 20 years, Struever Brothers, Eccles & Rouse Inc. will receive a $1.5 million state loan, as well as federal and state historic-preservation tax credits, to renovate the 97-year-old hotel at 306 W. Franklin St. Struever Brothers will invest $7.2 million to...
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
Many Baltimore City property owners may have a hard time comprehending the size of their tax bills, but the bills themselves should make more sense when the new batch goes out in the mail in a couple of months. City tax bills are getting something of a makeover. “We are in the process of redesigning some elements of the tax bill to the extent that our current systems allow,” mayoral spokesman Ryan O'Doherty said this week in an email. O'Doherty said details won't be available for another couple weeks, but added: “We are generally pleased with the efforts the city plans to implement this year to make bills more transparent.” Vague wording has confused some taxpayers , particularly when it comes to property tax credits.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | October 11, 2008
Promising that revenue from slots machines would provide a "significant and permanent reduction" in city property taxes, Mayor Sheila Dixon and other local elected officials yesterday urged city residents to vote for a November ballot measure to expand gambling in the state. "I made it very clear, so I hope you report it very clear: I'm supporting Question 2 to reduce the property tax," Dixon said at a news conference, referring to the slots referendum on the ballot. The referendum would authorize 15,000 machines at five slots parlors across the state, including one in Baltimore.
NEWS
June 21, 1997
FOR MOST OF its 25 years, the privately-owned 268-unit Eutaw Gardens apartment complex on the northern fringes of Bolton Hill has been a monument to bad planning and neglectful management. Things got so bad that a year ago it was emptied out of remaining tenants and boarded up. Today, it will be demolished.In its stead will rise 84 units of historically designed townhouses priced between $115,000 and $130,000. Will they sell in a city of thousands of vacant houses? Most likely they will.In Baltimore, new homes tend to sell as long as they have the amenities buyers expect to get in the suburbs -- like garages and fireplaces -- and are close to good schools.
NEWS
August 22, 1991
Anyone who thinks Baltimore's population and property tax base are shrinking solely due to the exodus of the white middle class need only look at the Fourth District to be proved wrong. Block upon block of West Baltimore row houses, which once were the pride of the city's black lawyers and doctors, teachers and letter carriers, are showing the signs of neglect and abandonment.As the black middle class moves out of the city, once vibrant institutions deteriorate. On the border of the district on Druid Hill Avenue, the Mitchell family law office that once was a beehive of civil rights activism now is selling bail bonds.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2004
A bill meant to reap millions from Baltimore's many cell phone users was introduced last night at a City Council meeting, where members also approved a tax break for a much smaller group: widows and widowers of fallen police officers, firefighters and rescue workers. Two years after a plan to tax cell phone service died amid stiff industry opposition, the council is considering such a levy again. Councilwoman Catherine E. Pugh introduced the bill, which was referred to the Taxation Committee.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1995
For the first time in five years, 5,000 city workers will receive pay increases that outpace inflation -- at a cost of $4 million to the city.Despite the cost, city officials who negotiated the contract say they don't begrudge the 4 percent pay raises, which exceed the current 3.2 percent rate of inflation."
NEWS
By Edward H. Shur | May 10, 1992
A year ago, Westminster Mayor Ben Brown wanted to chop 8 cents off the 91-cent tax rate.The City Council refused, passing a budget retaining the rate of 91 cents per $100 of assessed value.It was just another in the continuing battle between the mayor and council.But the mayor held firm, vetoing the budget.Then came the city election, and three new council members were elected.The new five-member body lowered the tax rate.That gave the owner of the average $134,000 home about a 9 percent ($42.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
Circuit Court Clerk Frank M. Conaway Sr. has paid more than $3,600 in back property taxes on a rental home he owns, months after it emerged that he'd wrongly been receiving a homestead tax break on the house for years. "I was very happy to pay it, to tell you the truth," he said Tuesday. "If I owed it, I wanted to pay it. " Conaway paid the bill Dec. 21, the same day city finance officials were quoted in a Baltimore Sun article saying they were still awaiting a check from him. Conaway says that's the first time he knew how much money he owed.
NEWS
December 22, 2011
The Sun investigation into the Homestead tax credit and its impact on the city ("Distorted discount," Dec. 18) perpetuates the fiction that the Baltimore property tax rate (2.268 percent) is "at least double that of any other jurisdiction in Maryland. " I am looking at my current Howard County property tax bill and I am obliged to pay a total of 1.230 percent for county tax, fire protection, and ad valorem (debt service on county bonds and operation of the county water and sewer system)
NEWS
By Brendan Coyne and Zelda Robinson | August 16, 2010
Recent opinions expressed on the pages of The Baltimore Sun make it seem like the proposed 25th Street Station project in Remington is a done deal — and that the proposal as written is the only choice for Baltimore. The coalition groups we represent, Bmore Local and Baltimore CAN, disagree, as does a large and varied group of city residents who are committed to raising the standards for development in Baltimore, starting with 25th Street Station. We are concerned about the size and scope of the proposed development and what this type of big-box retail center would really mean for nearby residents and those who would work there.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | October 21, 2009
Baltimore's spending panel is expected to approve a pair of land deals with prospective casino owners today that could fulfill Mayor Sheila Dixon's pledge to lower city property taxes. Under the agreement, the city would extend a 75-year lease for a Russell Street parcel to Baltimore City Entertainment Group to build a slots parlor, and enter into an unusual profit-sharing arrangement: The city would get 2.99 percent of the gross gambling revenue as rent. Also, the city would sell the casino owners three nearby plots that would immediately begin generating $3.2 million in annual property taxes.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Gadi Dechter and Laura Smitherman and Gadi Dechter,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com and gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | October 27, 2008
Just as Inner Harbor redevelopment transformed Baltimore's derelict port of rotting wharves and abandoned warehouses, Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration believes that a slot machine casino could revive a moribund industrial district while reducing city property taxes. But critics contend that a gambling venue in the shadow of M&T Bank Stadium would worsen the poverty and crime that plague neighborhoods just beyond the city's center. They doubt that such a project would bring meaningful tax relief.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | October 11, 2008
Promising that revenue from slots machines would provide a "significant and permanent reduction" in city property taxes, Mayor Sheila Dixon and other local elected officials yesterday urged city residents to vote for a November ballot measure to expand gambling in the state. "I made it very clear, so I hope you report it very clear: I'm supporting Question 2 to reduce the property tax," Dixon said at a news conference, referring to the slots referendum on the ballot. The referendum would authorize 15,000 machines at five slots parlors across the state, including one in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Brendan Coyne and Zelda Robinson | August 16, 2010
Recent opinions expressed on the pages of The Baltimore Sun make it seem like the proposed 25th Street Station project in Remington is a done deal — and that the proposal as written is the only choice for Baltimore. The coalition groups we represent, Bmore Local and Baltimore CAN, disagree, as does a large and varied group of city residents who are committed to raising the standards for development in Baltimore, starting with 25th Street Station. We are concerned about the size and scope of the proposed development and what this type of big-box retail center would really mean for nearby residents and those who would work there.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1999
The Schmoke administration is soliciting support for a newly drafted bill that could exempt from city property taxes nearly every new commercial real estate project over $10 million.The legislation, prepared by city officials, would reinstate $75 million in tax breaks for the Wyndham Inner Harbor East hotel.The new bill would allow tax breaks for hotels including the $134 million Wyndham now under construction, as well as new office buildings, retail projects, apartments and garages.The bill, which would grant payments in lieu of taxes (PILOTs)
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | March 28, 2008
The General Assembly has passed legislation that would let local governments give tax breaks to two Ocean City amusement parks, both of which have been grappling with skyrocketing property tax bills. The bills, which were sponsored by Del. James N. Mathias Jr., could help keep Trimper Rides and Amusements and the Jolly Roger Amusement Park in business. Both resort mainstays have struggled with escalating property taxes because of the real estate boom. "They're both very vital to the continued success of Ocean City," said Mayor Richard W. Meehan.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Bradley Olson and John Fritze and Bradley Olson,Sun reporters | October 31, 2007
An 11-acre warehouse district south of Baltimore's sports stadiums would become the home of a new slots facility under a proposal by Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration that officials said could cut city property taxes, The Sun has learned. If the statewide proposal to legalize slot machines is approved, Dixon would push the site - which is owned almost entirely by the city - as the best option to keep gambling out of residential neighborhoods and give Baltimore greater control over the facility's operation.
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