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By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
The city's Board of Estimates on Wednesday is set to approve parking rate increases at two downtown garages. Rates for those parking between four and 12 hours at the Arena Garage, near the Baltimore Arena, will increase from $14 to $15. "Early bird" parking rates at the Market Garage, near Lexington Market, will increase from $6 to $7 while the fee charged to those who park between four and 24 hours will increase from $8 to $9. The Parking Authority...
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
The city's Board of Estimates on Wednesday is set to approve parking rate increases at two downtown garages. Rates for those parking between four and 12 hours at the Arena Garage, near the Baltimore Arena, will increase from $14 to $15. "Early bird" parking rates at the Market Garage, near Lexington Market, will increase from $6 to $7 while the fee charged to those who park between four and 24 hours will increase from $8 to $9. The Parking Authority...
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
The Baltimore Development Corp. has agreed to sell the historic Senator Theatre to its current operators, officials said Thursday. The BDC's acting president, Kimberly A. Clark, announced the sale to Kathleen Cusack and her father James "Buzz" Cusack at a board of directors meeting but did not disclose the terms of the sale. Reached by phone, Kathleen Cusack said details were still being worked out. "It certainly makes more sense for the city and for us," she said. "It's a step in the right direction.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Baltimore officials plan to divert $3 million in anticipated casino revenue that had been earmarked for community improvements to replace a major artery in the city's underground steam pipe system. The proposal has drawn criticism from local elected officials and community leaders who say it is a misuse of the funds to be generated by the new Horseshoe Casino Baltimore. They want the money to be used for neighborhood-oriented projects, such as walking trails or efforts to connect unemployed residents with jobs.
NEWS
By Alison Matas, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
Whitney Swander woke before dawn three days this week to talk with people who have been sleeping on the city's streets. That's how she met Ron — a man who has moved across the country since becoming homeless and, lately, has spent his days drinking coffee in a McDonald's in southern Baltimore. "He wants a way into a more stable life," she said, pausing. "I keep thinking about Ron. " The Mayor's Office of Human Services-Homeless Services Program and the Baltimore Home for Good Campaign announced Friday morning an initiative to find housing for the 75 most vulnerable homeless people in the city.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
Baltimore plans to pay its speed camera vendor $600,000 to end a troubled relationship that has left the city's once-lucrative automated enforcement program offline since April, city officials said Monday. Termination of the contract with Brekford Corp. puts the future of the city's speed and red-light camera system in question. One city councilwoman says it's time to stop using technology to nab speeders and red-light runners. Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke said the city should stop using speed cameras and instead station more traffic officers at dangerous intersections and "speedways," whether by paying police overtime or by hiring more traffic enforcement officers.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
The Rawlings-Blake administration is set to give $200,000 to help H&S Bakery move its Harbor East distribution center to an industrial area of East Baltimore - sparking discussion of whether subsidies should be needed to help a successful business expand. City officials are praising the deal, which goes before the Board of Estimates Wednesday, as an inexpensive way to keep a large employer in Baltimore. But others are questioning why H&S needs any help from a cash-strapped city that has cut back on fire companies and recreation centers in recent years.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 7, 1993
Would you buy a used car from this retailer?Circuit City Stores Inc., the giant home electronics chain, startled Wall Street, auto dealers and much of the retail world yesterday with an announcement that it was going into the used-car business.The news, tucked near the end of a news release detailing the company's financial results, overshadowed a 38 percent increase in profits in Circuit City's fiscal fourth quarter."I was a little surprised that the media picked up on that when we announced earnings that were above expectations and described our keymarkets and plans for expansion, all of which will have a big impact on our business," said Ann Collier, Circuit City's spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | September 10, 1992
In an effort to curb rowdiness, the city plans to restrict beer sales at next month's Fells Point Fun Festival, a move that organizers say would depress profits and possibly sound the death knell for the popular event."
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | September 23, 2009
Baltimore plans to lay off 27 employees and contract workers, including a Fire Department commander, to help plug a hole in the city's budget created by declining tax revenues, according to a draft agenda for today's Board of Estimates meeting. "Everybody is feeling this," Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon said Tuesday. "No one is not a part of this." The layoffs would come from six agencies and, along with a proposed citywide furlough plan and other spending reductions, will be presented to the city's spending panel for approval on Wednesday.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Several Baltimore City Council members expressed skepticism Monday about a plan to sell some downtown parking garages, while others began lobbying the Rawlings-Blake administration to claim funds from the sale for recreation centers in their districts. Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young said he has concerns about the administration's proposal to raise up to $60 million for recreation centers by selling four of the city's 17 parking garages. Young noted the four garages are money-makers - bringing in $400,000 annually - and questioned whether it's wise to forgo future revenue for a quick cash infusion.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
The Rawlings-Blake administration is set to give $200,000 to help H&S Bakery move its Harbor East distribution center to an industrial area of East Baltimore - sparking discussion of whether subsidies should be needed to help a successful business expand. City officials are praising the deal, which goes before the Board of Estimates Wednesday, as an inexpensive way to keep a large employer in Baltimore. But others are questioning why H&S needs any help from a cash-strapped city that has cut back on fire companies and recreation centers in recent years.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
To better account for hundreds of millions of grant dollars, Baltimore finance officials have a plan to overhaul city policies, train staff and keep records in a centralized database. Harry E. Black, the city's finance director, said the project should take about a year to complete and cost between $300,000 and $500,000. The city also has hired a grants coordinator to oversee the money, which accounted for about 13 percent of the budget last year, or $332 million. "Whatever we receive, we want to make certain it's aligned with the city's priorities and goals and that we are managing this process and the funds … in the most efficient and effective way," Black said.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
The two warehouses Amazon will open in Baltimore are not intended for its new grocery service, according to the developer of the facility. The online retailer is in the middle of expanding its shipping facilities in pursuit of cheaper, faster shipping. Last fall, it announced plans for a one-million-square-foot distribution center on Broening Avenue expected to bring about 1,000 jobs. The one-story building will be used as a fulfillment center, where employees pack orders, said Brian Strohl of Duke Realty, which is developing the former General Motors site in East Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
It's a mere yellowing piece of paper with a few hundred words scrawled on it, a document that once sat forgotten in a drawer for three-quarters of a century. But this summer, the original manuscript of "The Star-Spangled Banner," the poem Francis Scott Key wrote about a certain inspiring morning in September 1814, will be the centerpiece of a sprawling, multimillion-dollar statewide celebration. On Friday morning, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced the schedule of events for Star-Spangled Summer 2014, a three-month tribute that will conclude Maryland's commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
Baltimore plans to pay its speed camera vendor $600,000 to end a troubled relationship that has left the city's once-lucrative automated enforcement program offline since April, city officials said Monday. Termination of the contract with Brekford Corp. puts the future of the city's speed and red-light camera system in question. One city councilwoman says it's time to stop using technology to nab speeders and red-light runners. Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke said the city should stop using speed cameras and instead station more traffic officers at dangerous intersections and "speedways," whether by paying police overtime or by hiring more traffic enforcement officers.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2001
There's something fishy going on in Baltimore. The city plans to mount 200 rainbow-colored, rhinestone-encrusted fish statues this spring on busy downtown street corners to boost local morale and reel in tourists. Each of the Ichthyaerius Baltimoris will have its own eccentric, psychedelic design - dreamed up by local artists - and will be about the size and weight of Ravens' lineman Tony Siragusa (boasting, as well, the "Goose's" outsized panache). Mayor Martin O'Malley hopes to make a big splash by announcing plans for the "Fish Out of Water" exhibit at City Hall on Tuesday.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2013
The Annapolis City Council approved a new vision plan for downtown's City Dock shortly after midnight Tuesday, the culmination of a process that stretched over three years and became a top issue for next week's city election. Starting with the creation of a citizen's advisory committee and ending with an 8-1 vote in the wee hours of the morning in the nearly-empty council chambers, the City Dock process has been fraught with disagreements over parking, traffic and how the historic area could be allowed to be redeveloped in the future without ruining its maritime charm.
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