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NEWS
June 13, 2013
Kudos to Baltimore for being recognized as one of the top cities for its parks and outdoor resources ("Baltimore's parks slip to 21st in nation," June 5). There's no question that open spaces and parks can contribute to a healthier, even more prosperous community. Except just having great parks does not seem to have the pizazz needed to lure teens and young adults outdoors. As summer vacation looms for America's youth, their focus will be directed largely at zombie warriors, space aliens and warships, or mega-armies battling mythical beasts raging from video games, not so much on outdoor activities.
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NEWS
By Leonard Gilroy and Christopher Summers | August 11, 2014
Running parking garages is not a core function of government, so Baltimore Mayor Rawlings-Blake's plan to sell off city-owned garages would be an encouraging step toward shedding non-essential city assets and investing in more important priorities for the city's residents and long-term fiscal health. The mayor proposes selling four downtown city-owned garages to generate between $40 million to $60 million in net proceeds (after paying off $24 million in garage debt) that would be used to make improvements to city recreation centers.
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NEWS
June 21, 1994
&TC A fascinating snippet of information culled by Yale University is that Baltimore has more parks and recreational facilities than any other American city of its size. This is swell news for those who like recreational activities and the great outdoors. The flip side, of course, is that such facilities are expensive to maintain.A newly published 32-page tabloid lists this summer's parks and recreation activities. It underscores how many programs are available to Baltimore residents in more than 100 facilities.
NEWS
By Bob Jacobson | April 25, 2014
"Hey, it felt like a real city there for a minute," commented a waiter from Tapas Teatro, one block up North Charles Street from Penn Station. "All right, we have a touch of New Orleans," said an enthusiastic MTA employee coming out of the William Donald Schaefer office tower, downtown at St. Paul and Baltimore Streets. They were reacting to the jazz music by Swing N' Samba - Michael Spittel on guitar and me on saxophone. Live music played outdoors gives city streets a certain kind of energy, a vitality that people respond to. Creating that vitality was the goal in 2005, when then-Baltimore City Councilwoman Catherine Pugh proposed a licensing system for street entertainers in the hopes it would encourage the kind of performances she saw in her native Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2000
City parks activists such as Sandra Sparks and Peggy Stansbury say Baltimore's park system is not just in trouble, but in crisis -- which is why they are convening a conference starting today on "Great Urban Parks: Sustaining the Legacy." The opening event will be a reception at Druid Hill Park's Conservatory and Botanic Gardens to show that there was a time when Baltimore cultivated beautiful and graceful parks. After two days of tours and workshops, the conference will end with a rally led by Mayor Martin O'Malley at noon Tuesday at City Hall Plaza.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2002
The overhaul of the Baltimore Parks Department continued with the hiring of two administrators to key posts. Roslyn Joy Johnson, a former teacher, is the new chief of the recreation division and Chris T. Delaporte, who was head of parks and recreation for the city in the 1980s, will lead the parks division. Johnson, 29, who was regional director for a Florida-based company called StudyWorks, which prepares students for the SAT test, replaced longtime administrator Zenobia McLendon, 54, on Sept.
NEWS
April 29, 2001
THERE WAS considerable excitement when Friends of Patterson Park held its annual meeting last month. More than 300 people attended, including 160 who signed up to join the booster group's rapidly growing membership roster. Forty-three exhibitors also participated. The reason for this record turnout: Good things are happening around Patterson Park. The 166-acre Southeast Baltimore oasis is slated for a $2.5 million facelift. Lighting and landscaping will be improved. The lake -- which has seven varieties of ducks even though it lacks boats -- will be reconstructed.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2002
When someone complained about broken basketball hoops in Baltimore's Gwynns Falls Park this summer, a city worker dispatched to fix the problem couldn't find the playground, yet reported to his bosses that the case had been "closed." Meanwhile, 131 replacement hoops sat unused in a warehouse. Outside the Farring Bay Brook Recreation Center in South Baltimore, a visitor found hip-high weeds on the tot lot, graffiti scrawled on the jungle gym, splintered benches, drinking fountains that didn't work, a volleyball court without a net and a chess table with its top ripped off. In Clifton Park in the northeastern section of the city, a crumbling city waterworks building - filled with mattresses, vodka bottles and heaps of garbage - remained open to children more than a month after someone called to urge the city to board up the structure.
FEATURES
By Harry Shattuck and Syd Kearney and Harry Shattuck and Syd Kearney,Houston Chronicle | May 3, 1998
While planning vacations in the great cities of the world, we carefully plot courses to the best-known museums, theaters, restaurants and shops.But where do we discover a community's heart? Often in its parks and playgrounds, away from concrete and crowds and mass tourism propaganda.Best of all, a walk in the park usually costs only time.Londoners' appreciation for pomp and circumstance and spirited debate takes on new meaning in St. James' and Hyde parks. Fun-loving Bavarian charm is never more evident than in Munich's Englischer Garten.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2001
Amid Baltimore's budget cuts and expected layoffs comes this dose of good news: The state is funneling millions of dollars into the city's frumpy park system. Dozens of parks projects - from upgraded bath houses to new playgrounds to new ballfields - are going forward with $4.34 million in state funds. The state Board of Public Works is set to give final approval tomorrow for that spending, which was earmarked in last year's budget. An additional $4.8 million for city parks was included in the recently adopted state budget and will help fund a broad wish list of projects in the next fiscal year.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Baltimore officials approved Wednesday a payment of nearly $100,000 to the American Civil Liberties Union to settle a longstanding federal lawsuit over protesters' rights in Baltimore. As part of the settlement, city officials agreed to loosen restrictions on protesting. The new rules allow groups of up to 30 people to protest or pass out fliers without obtaining a permit at all city parks and 10 designated locations, including McKeldin Square by the Inner Harbor. City Solicitor George Nilson, a member of the Board of Estimates, which authorized the deal, also said protesters can now obtain instant permits to hold demonstrations.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
It was a fantasyland created to celebrate innocent storybook tales, yet it was integrated nearly a decade before civil rights laws demanded it. That was the unusual mix of sweetness and humanity that could be found for decades at the Enchanted Forest in Ellicott City. Their sentimental pull still powerful nearly six decades later, the Ellicott City amusement park's figures and structures, which found a second home eight years ago at Clark's Elioak Farm, will soon enjoy yet another revival in the public's consciousness.
NEWS
June 13, 2013
Kudos to Baltimore for being recognized as one of the top cities for its parks and outdoor resources ("Baltimore's parks slip to 21st in nation," June 5). There's no question that open spaces and parks can contribute to a healthier, even more prosperous community. Except just having great parks does not seem to have the pizazz needed to lure teens and young adults outdoors. As summer vacation looms for America's youth, their focus will be directed largely at zombie warriors, space aliens and warships, or mega-armies battling mythical beasts raging from video games, not so much on outdoor activities.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 5, 2013
Baltimore's park system has slipped from 15th to 21st in an expanded ranking of open space in the nation's 50 largest cities with relatively low funding cited as a continuing problem. The nonprofit Trust for Public Land gave Baltimore's 4,905 acres of parks the same overall grade Wednesday as it had last year -- three out of a possible five "park benches," or stars, in its ParkScore rating system. But the city lost ground in the rankings because the trust added 10 new cities to its review of  municipal parks, several of which topped Baltimore, including Minneapolis, which came in #1, Omaha, Neb. (#11)
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
It's taken about three years of wrangling, but Baltimore's Department of Recreation and Parks has finally turned over a year of its financial books to city auditors. "I'm not jumping up and down yet," Councilman Carl Stokes, who chairs the council's finance committee, said Wednesday. "We don't know what shape the records are in. But we're pleased that after three years we do have a turnover of books. " Comptroller Joan M. Pratt said auditors are going through the department's financial records to determine whether they are detailed enough to be audited.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Annapolis officials are considering a plan to remove trash cans from city parks, a strategy they say would save money and could keep public spaces cleaner. Without trash cans, officials said, visitors would take refuse with them or learn to not produce it in the first place. Other parks across the country have adopted such "trash-free" policies, including all Maryland state parks and scores of national parks, which urge visitors to "leave no trace. " In Annapolis, the idea comes amid broader changes that, for the first time, shifted city trash service into private hands to cut costs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2009
SUNDAY Family Festival: Families are invited to International Family Day at the Walters Art Museum, 600 N. Charles St. Through a partnership with the Refugee Youth Project, International Family Day raises awareness about Baltimore's refugee population by allowing guests to meet and speak with some of the city's youngest refugees. The event will also feature hands-on activities and a performance and workshop by local break dance group Funky Rhythm Junk Crew. The event is free and open to the public 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Call 410-547-9000 or go to thewalters.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 13, 2006
If any good can emerge from the aftermath of the tragic death of Deanna Green, the 14-year-old girl who was electrocuted at a softball field in Druid Hill Park, I hope it would be an increased emphasis on park maintenance. The explanation city parks director Connie A. Brown put forth in a news conference this week that a freakish combination of circumstances led to the accident seems plausible. He said that the tip of metal fence post tapped into an underground cable, sending a lethal dose of electricity into the softball player when she simultaneously touched two metal fences along the sidelines.
NEWS
October 18, 2012
As a longtime resident of Main Street in Historic Ellicott City, I support parking meters on Main Street and understand their purpose. As a resident, I have rarely parked my vehicle on Main Street during business hours in order to free up a spot for a tourist to come spend money and enjoy our fantastic little town. It's a minor inconvenience for the greater good. I believe the new system that will allow visitors to use their smart phones or computers to locate available spaces will be a benefit to all ("Parking plan splits Main St. merchants," Oct. 14)
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Ed Williams, the apron-wearing proprietor of the Mumble and Squeak Toy Shoppe on Ellicott City's Main Street, has for decades heard arguments about downtown parking. It's a multiheaded beast - studied often, discussed ad nauseam and yet unsettled - but he figures he can point out what he considers the essence of the problem quickly by stepping out of his store on a bright October weekday afternoon. Note the white Chevy parked in front of his shop, he says, and across the street the white van and another car up the street - all belonging not to customers but to the owners of local businesses.
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