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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | July 14, 2011
In this week's City Paper, Mary K. Zajac reviews dinner at Piedigrotta Bakery in Little Italy, and Van Smith reviews Cafe Gourmet at the University of Maryland Biopark. Wish I'd thought of those. If you know a place that's ripe for a review or a reappraisal, tweet  @gorelickingood, or email me at richard.gorelick@baltsun.com Here's Mary's Piedigrotta review and Van's of Cafe Gourmet . Piedgirotta is the bakery owned by the man who invented tiramisu.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector | February 20, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Media Group announced Thursday that it is buying the alternative weekly City Paper for an undisclosed price, bringing the city's two most recognizable print journalism outlets under the same roof. City Paper will remain independent from the group's other outlets with a separate newsroom and sales team, said Timothy E. Ryan, publisher, president and CEO of Baltimore Sun Media Group. “This represents a great opportunity to add another successful media property to our portfolio,” Ryan said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector | February 20, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Media Group announced Thursday that it is buying the alternative weekly City Paper for an undisclosed price, bringing the city's two most recognizable print journalism outlets under the same roof. City Paper will remain independent from the group's other outlets with a separate newsroom and sales team, said Timothy E. Ryan, publisher, president and CEO of Baltimore Sun Media Group. “This represents a great opportunity to add another successful media property to our portfolio,” Ryan said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
The owner of the Baltimore City Paper said Monday it is in negotiations with a potential buyer, the same day it announced the collective sale of its four other alternative weekly newspapers. Scott Lynett, CEO of Times-Shamrock Communications, which has operated the City Paper for about 25 years, confirmed the negotiations but declined to identify the potential buyer. He also said he will directly oversee the publishing of the City Paper for now, after the paper's interim publisher, Michael Wagner, departed Times-Shamrock on Monday as part of the separate sale of its other alternative weeklies.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | May 12, 1995
A Baltimore Realtor has filed a $16 million defamation suit against the company that publishes City Paper over an article that appeared last month in which his business practices were questioned.In the suit filed last month in Baltimore Circuit Court, Gary Waicker, president of two realty companies in the 3400 block of Erdman Ave., is seeking $1 million in compensatory damages and $15 million in punitive damages from Scranton Times Limited Partnership, which publishes the free weekly newspaper.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | December 29, 1993
Michael Yockel, the editor of City Paper, Baltimore's largest alternative weekly newspaper, was fired yesterday after five years on the job."I was entirely shocked," said Mr. Yockel, a 41-year-old Baltimore native who has worked at City Paper off and on for 14 years. "I have no idea why I was dismissed."The paper's general manager, Donald Farley, walked into the editorial offices after this week's edition was sent to the presses, Mr. Yockel said, and announced, "I think it's time for a change, and that Michael Yockel and City Paper ought to have a parting of the ways."
NEWS
By Granville Greene | February 2, 1994
AS a former City Paper writer, I read Mary Corey's Jan. 23 article about the paper's recent editorial turnover with great interest. I was born, raised and educated in Baltimore, and my first job out of college was as a staff writer at the City Paper in 1985. Russ Smith was editor then, and my first assignment was to ride an elephant in the Ringling Brothers Circus parade and cover it for Rump, the CP's obnoxious gossip column.In contrast to the City Paper's present, more corporate incarnation, when I was there the writers sat at beat-up old desks in a sticky garret office in Charles Village.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | September 3, 1993
Baltimore author Michael Kun just finished writing his second novel last month. But he won't have to wait long to see what readers will think of "Our Poor Sweet Napoleon."That's because Mr. Kun's 592-page novel -- set almost entirely in Baltimore -- will be serialized in the City Paper, the city weekly arts newspaper. The first chapter is included in the Sept. 3-9 issue, and the City Paper will publish further chapters for about the next half- year, says editor Michael Yockel.Mr. Yockel says he decided to serialize "Our Poor Sweet Napoleon" after Mr. Kun, an attorney in the downtown office of the Piper & Marbury firm, sent him the first two chapters a few weeks ago. "The whole idea of serializing a novel appeals to me. Newspapers used to do that a lot a long time ago."
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | January 23, 1994
So this is Sono Motoyama, you think, as she eases into the room, head down, smile hesitant and hand reluctantly extended. This woman, who in her silk shirt and leggings, looks even thinner than 95 pounds and seems almost meek as she makes small talk about crime in the city and her cat named Petunia.This is the same woman who has written about sadomasochism in Baltimore, a biker named Killer, psychic fairs in Towson and intimate aspects of her personal life, including an abortion she had several years ago.But perhaps Ms. Motoyama's most surprising move came weeks ago when she took over as editor of City Paper, Baltimore's largest alternative weekly newspaper, replacing editor Michael Yockel who was fired abruptly after 10 years there.
NEWS
December 5, 1993
Jim Duffy's long City Paper article, "Kill the Messenger: The Last March of Bill Moore," is the winner of this year's $500 A. D. Emmart Memorial Award for published writing in the humanities.Mr. Moore, a 25-year-old Baltimore postman and civil rights activist, was shot dead in April 1963 while walking alone along an Alabama highway. He was carrying a sign that read, "Black or White, Eat at Joe's. End Segregation in America."Honorable mention and a $100 prize go to Linell N. Smith for her Sun Magazine article, "One Day at a Time: Living With Depression," and to Arthur J. Magida for his Jewish Times article about the Holocaust Museum in Washington, "Out of the Silence."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
A freelance photographer says he was arrested for taking pictures of Baltimore Police breaking up a party on Friday night. Police, meanwhile, said the photographer, Noah Scialom, refused to leave and blocked the flow of partygoers who had been ordered out, and tried to discard a bag of marijuana after being taken to Central Booking. They say a CCTV camera shows that Scialom was in the way, and that the organizer of the party will face charges as well. In an interview, Scialom said "the police account is full of lies.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
A Baltimore City Paper reporter testified in a federal murder-for-hire trial Thursday, drawn into the story of a man whose career as a builder and petty criminal he has covered for more than half a decade. Edward Ericson Jr., a staff writer for the alternative weekly, first wrote about defendant Jose Morales in 2006 in an article questioning his building practices. Morales was later convicted on federal drug charges. He's now on trial in the death of Robert Long, a man who had been working with authorities against Morales in a theft case.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
The owner of the Baltimore City Paper said Monday that it's looking to sell as it focuses on the media market closer to its Pennsylvania base. Times-Shamrock Communications, based in Scranton, said it is marketing all five of its alternative weeklies — which cover areas outside Pennsylvania — and four daily newspapers. "Baltimore City Paper has been a strong, profitable investment for us for many years," said Scott Lynett, Times-Shamrock's CEO, in a statement. "As we look to diversify our family's holdings, it made sense for us to offer City Paper for sale to someone who could take it to the next level of growth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Jennifer Marsh is out as publisher of the Baltimore City Paper after almost two years on the job. She resigned Monday, according to a statement from Times-Shamrock Communications, the Scranton-based company that owns the publication. "Jennifer has been a valuable member of the City Paper team for many years," Scott Lynett, CEO of Times-Shamrock, said in a statement announcing the resignation. "We wish her the best of luck in her future endeavors. " Michael Wagner, regional publisher for Times-Shamrock, will step in as interim publisher, according to the company statement.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
Amid the local furor over the George Zimmerman acquittal - a protest outside Baltimore City Hall drew hundreds - one city councilman wonders if city residents are overlooking home-grown crime.  Away from the rally City Councilman Brandon Scott brought up Darryl Anderson, a fugitive that police have called "public enemy No. 1" and who is being sought in connection with two murders - a Baltimore County case, and a recent triple shooting in...
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2013
The members of Baltimore's ethics board wrote an email to Councilman James Kraft Friday chastising him for comments made in The Sun and the City Paper regarding a dispute between the board and members of the council over a piece of ethics leglsiation.  At issue is legislation - sought by Council President  Bernard C. "Jack" Young   - that would loosen conflict-of-interest restrictions that have sometimes prevented City Council members from...
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1996
Andy Markowitz was poised to leave journalism and enter film school when he was tapped as the City Paper's new editor earlier this month.His sudden U-turn had everything to do with the City Paper and nothing to do with second thoughts about quitting newspapers, Mr. Markowitz says in his airy Mount Vernon office."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 13, 2000
For 17 years Jennifer Bishop's photographs appeared every week in the pages of the City Paper, Baltimore's alternative weekly, helping to define the look of the metropolis and its people. Bishop even had her own regular space, which she could fill with any image that pleased her, unfettered by second-guessing editors; she used it to record the quirky moments, sudden epiphanies, visual paradoxes and poetic ironies that define the strangeness of everyday life in this city. Yet oddly, the photographer who chronicled the soul of Baltimore so relentlessly - and lovingly - has never until now had a one-person exhibit of her pictures in the town she has lived and worked in for the past 25 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2012
Red Emma's Bookstore Coffeehouse will move next year from its Mount Vernon home of eight years to Station North. The collectively owned anarchist coffee shop and bookstore has signed a lease for the Station North storefront at 30 W. North Ave. News of the lease signing was posted on the coffee house's Facebook page and on a fundraising website and first blurted out on the City Paper blog . Depending on your donation, the perk...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ian Zelaya | October 30, 2012
For one month each year, Adam Van Bavel doesn't shave his mustache. He does this to not only get strange looks, but to also help kids in need. "My mustache is a gleaming example of how bad you can look in the name of good," Van Bavel said. The 33-year-old Pigtown resident and Baltimore native has volunteered at Mustaches for Kids for the past four years, and was named Baltimore's "Best Do-Gooder" by the City Paper readers' poll. Members of Mustaches for Kids grow mustaches for one month and raise money to benefit Baltimore City public schools.
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