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NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1998
Police said they arrested five people yesterday in breaking up an alleged gang that sold some 2,500 stun guns in Baltimore.But police have seized just over 200 of the devices that can deliver a maximum of 100,000 volts."
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
A federal court judge has approved a settlement between Ocean City and a spray paint artist, changing the town code so that it no longer violates the free-speech rights of street performers. On Monday, U.S. District Court Judge L. Ellen Hollander signed the consent decree, which was submitted by both parties last week. It allows writers, painters, performers, sculptors, musicians and others to sell their works along the boardwalk without fear of interference by police. Those who sell manufactured goods such as candles, stuffed animals and sunglasses are not included in the protected class.
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NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
A week ago, the spangled purses, tiger-themed dartboard and embroidered portrait of John F. and Robert Kennedy propped outside the door of the Hampden Junque Shop would not only have been the height of kitsch -- they would have been illegal. Yesterday, proprietor Margo Goldman was able to legally display the items -- along with that Hampden perennial, pink flamingos -- outside her shop, thanks to a city ordinance that went into effect Sunday. That ordinance lifts restrictions imposed by a 1977 measure that prevented Hampden shops from displaying merchandise outside.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Peter.hermann@baltsun.com | June 17, 2009
On Aug. 18 at 4:30 p.m., Chang K. Yim rolled down the two corrugated metal doors to his liquor store on North Avenue and secured each with locks. Doing the work himself and a half-hour before deadline, he avoided the spectacle of his store being padlocked by a police commander with television cameras rolling. This was the first test of police enforcing the city padlock ordinance that allowed Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III to keep Linden Bar and Liquors in Reservoir Hill closed for up to a year.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | March 7, 1991
A new $26 million medical waste incinerator in Hawkins Point is burning hospital refuse trucked in from New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, angering nearby residents because the controversial facility is barred by city ordinance from taking out-of-state trash.The incinerator, which began "test burns" in December, is importing about 30 tons of medical waste daily from out of state because it cannot get enough hospital refuse locally to meet its needs, according to George Balog, the city's public works director.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2003
The fight over a city ordinance allowing advertising on 1st Mariner Arena re-ignited yesterday as a judge temporarily blocked the city from requiring a billboard in Southwest Baltimore to be taken down as part of a deal with Baltimore Blast owner Edwin F. Hale. City Circuit Judge John P. Miller issued a temporary restraining order sought by Up-To-Date Laundry, owner of the billboard at 2136 Frederick Ave. The laundry argued that the city never notified 14 businesses that a new ordinance could force the permanent removal of billboards on their properties as part of a swap to allow advertising on the outside of the arena.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | October 13, 1992
Westminster City Council members publicly agonized before taking the first step last night toward eliminating a regulation that bars demonstrators or marchers from displaying flags of nations at war with the United States.The council settled the issue primarily on pragmatic considerations -- City Attorney John B. Walsh Jr.'s cautious advice that he could try to rewrite the ordinance to keep the flag ban and still make it fit new Supreme Court rulings, but with no guarantees it would hold up, and the potential cost of losing a lawsuit and possibly being ordered to pay the other side's legal fees.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 30, 2003
DO YOU feel safer yet? About six minutes before late Sunday night turned into early Monday morning, Andrey Bundley - the principal of Walbrook High Uniform Services Academy and one of the few people with the guts to challenge Mayor Martin O'Malley's rule in Baltimore - started putting pint-size Bundley-for-mayor leaflets on some cars. With Bundley was one of his campaign workers, a tall, gangly chap who certainly couldn't be missed by the ever-cognizant Baltimore police. Here's what police and Bundley agree on: An officer shouted for Bundley to "stop doing that."
NEWS
By Edward L. Heard Jr. and Edward L. Heard Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | June 7, 1991
Medical Waste Associates' decision to use its $26 million incinerator to burn out-of-state wastes without city authorization may result in a courtroom showdown to decide whether the Hawkins Point facility will be shut down.The city Board of Municipal and Zoning Appeals recommended Wednesday that the incinerator be closed, but Medical Waste Associates will probably appeal the decision to the Baltimore Circuit Court and ask that it be allowed to operate at full capacity without current city restrictions.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Kaana Smith and Lyle Denniston and Kaana Smith,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1996
The Supreme Court left Baltimore in doubt yesterday about its power to put strict limits on large outdoor signs that promote cigarette smoking, turning over the fate of the city's 2-year-old ordinance to a lower court.In a two-sentence order, the justices told the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., to reconsider its ruling in August upholding the local billboard law.The appeals court was told to study the ordinance by applying a decision by the justices in mid-May on a Rhode Island case that appeared to liberate advertisers from many government controls.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 28, 2006
LAS VEGAS -- Gail Sacco pulled green grapes, bread, lunch meat and, in the blazing desert heat, bottles of water from a cardboard box. A dozen homeless people rose from shady spots in the surrounding city park and snatched the handouts from Sacco. With that act of giving, Sacco, an advocate for the homeless, scoffed at a city ordinance that goes into effect today making it illegal to offer so much as a biscuit to a poor person in a city park. Las Vegas, where the homeless population has doubled in the past decade to about 12,000 in and around the city, joins several other cities across the country that have adopted or considered ordinances limiting the distribution of charitable meals in parks.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
A week ago, the spangled purses, tiger-themed dartboard and embroidered portrait of John F. and Robert Kennedy propped outside the door of the Hampden Junque Shop would not only have been the height of kitsch -- they would have been illegal. Yesterday, proprietor Margo Goldman was able to legally display the items -- along with that Hampden perennial, pink flamingos -- outside her shop, thanks to a city ordinance that went into effect Sunday. That ordinance lifts restrictions imposed by a 1977 measure that prevented Hampden shops from displaying merchandise outside.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2004
WARNING: This story was written by a smoker. Its contents may offend, or even sicken, nonsmokers, warning-heeders and others. Forty years after the U.S. surgeon general first warned that cigarettes could cause cancer and other diseases, 46 million Americans are still smoking. The number of ashtrays, meanwhile, has dwindled to about 11. Or so it seems. Once, they were everywhere. In finer restaurants, clear glass ones garnished every table, omnipresent as salt shakers. In taverns, plastic ones were always within arm's length, dotting the bar like lights on a runway.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2003
The fight over a city ordinance allowing advertising on 1st Mariner Arena re-ignited yesterday as a judge temporarily blocked the city from requiring a billboard in Southwest Baltimore to be taken down as part of a deal with Baltimore Blast owner Edwin F. Hale. City Circuit Judge John P. Miller issued a temporary restraining order sought by Up-To-Date Laundry, owner of the billboard at 2136 Frederick Ave. The laundry argued that the city never notified 14 businesses that a new ordinance could force the permanent removal of billboards on their properties as part of a swap to allow advertising on the outside of the arena.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 30, 2003
DO YOU feel safer yet? About six minutes before late Sunday night turned into early Monday morning, Andrey Bundley - the principal of Walbrook High Uniform Services Academy and one of the few people with the guts to challenge Mayor Martin O'Malley's rule in Baltimore - started putting pint-size Bundley-for-mayor leaflets on some cars. With Bundley was one of his campaign workers, a tall, gangly chap who certainly couldn't be missed by the ever-cognizant Baltimore police. Here's what police and Bundley agree on: An officer shouted for Bundley to "stop doing that."
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2003
Prompted by a Girl Scout's desire to join a peaceful protest with the Westminster chapter of Women in Black, the city's Common Council is reconsidering a section in the municipal code that requires permits for groups of fewer than 25 demonstrators. "We want to get an ordinance on the books that will allow for the exercise of First Amendment rights without the fear of violating laws," said Ava E. Lias-Booker, a Baltimore attorney representing three Westminster residents who believe their right to protest is inhibited by the city code.
NEWS
By KEVIN L. McQUAID and KEVIN L. McQUAID,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Ivan Penn contributed to this article | November 25, 1998
A Baltimore judge struck down a city ordinance yesterday that would grant millions of dollars in tax breaks to the planned $134 million Wyndham Inner Harbor East hotel.Baltimore Circuit Judge Richard T. Rombro's decision represents a likely setback for the 31-story project, but the hotel's developers - and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke - vowed that it would proceed."Given that the city has been in litigation regarding this matter, the city has been considering alternatives to keep the project moving forward for some time," Schmoke said.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2003
Prompted by a Girl Scout's desire to join a peaceful protest with the Westminster chapter of Women in Black, the city's Common Council is reconsidering a section in the municipal code that requires permits for groups of fewer than 25 demonstrators. "We want to get an ordinance on the books that will allow for the exercise of First Amendment rights without the fear of violating laws," said Ava E. Lias-Booker, a Baltimore attorney representing three Westminster residents who believe their right to protest is inhibited by the city code.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2001
SALT LAKE CITY - It's Saturday night in the city that Brigham Young built, where the bright lights of downtown are more likely to be from the Mormon Temple than some hot nightspot. But that doesn't deter Rocky Anderson, the city's Minister of Fun, who also happens to be Salt Lake's first-term mayor. Anderson swears the city of 170,000 has a pulse that quickens when the sun goes down and a soul that stirs when the tempo is upbeat. You just have to know where to look. Like Diogenes in search of an honest man, Anderson is leading a one-man crusade for fun, an uphill battle against image.
SPORTS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. - The marquee at the Mons Venus club, located a half-mile from Raymond James Stadium, says it all: "Super Babes. Super Dances. Super Club for Super Bowl." But a player from an NFL team is the last person 19-year-old dancer Jessica Willis wants to see walk through the club's door this week, she said. "I don't want to jeopardize anyone's career for a lap dance," said Willis, a college student who said she makes up to $2,000 a week strutting around the club in a thong bikini.
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