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NEWS
January 18, 2012
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NEWS
October 6, 2014
The decision last week by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Police Commissioner Anthony Batts to call in federal investigators to probe allegations of excessive use of force and other misconduct by Baltimore police is as embarrassing as it was unavoidable. No city attempting to polish its image as an attractive place to live and work wants to admit having a problem with police brutality it can't handle. But since a six-month investigation by The Sun uncovered evidence of a dysfunctional department seemingly inimical to reform, it's been apparent that the city needs help.
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NEWS
July 9, 2012
Regarding your recent editorial advocating holding city elections on the presidential cycle, it doesn't make sense to only partially correct a situation that everyone agrees needs to be fixed ("Straightening out city elections," July 6). None of Baltimore's elected officials met with their constituents to discuss this election-cycle issue before they selfishly voted their preferences. The arguments for moving city elections to the gubernatorial cycle significantly outweigh the arguments our elected officials voted to help themselves.
NEWS
September 29, 2014
Taking their queue from the classic movie "Casablanca," some city officials are declaring themselves "shocked, shocked!" to learn that police brutality is a serious problem in Baltimore. An investigative report on Sunday by The Sun's Mark Puente found the city has paid out more than $5.7 million since 2011 in judgments or settlements of more than 100 lawsuits brought by citizens alleging excessive use of force and other police misconduct. Three years earlier, the city's budget office also raised concerns over its spending $10.4 million from 2008 through 2011 - an average of about $3.5 million annually - defending the Baltimore Police Department against misconduct lawsuits.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
* UPDATE on Deacon, the dumped puppy A 6-month-old puppy wound up at the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter (BARCS) yesterday after she was dumped in a city alley, and now the shelter and animal control officers want to know who left her there. Named Deacon, the puppy was found by a good Samaritan in an alley behind Deacon Hill Court in the Brooklyn neighborhood. The person who found her said the pup was friendly and tried to get up, but was too weak to move on her own and must have been left there earlier that day. She had signs of malnutrition, an extreme case of mange that's caused lesions all over her body, and sepsis.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2011
The total cost of the downtown infrastructure improvements for the first Baltimore Grand Prix racing event came in more than $1.19 million under budget, according to city officials. The 15-month project, which repaved nine lane miles downtown and near the stadiums, had a projected cost of $7.75 million, according to a news release from the mayor's office. In the end, the work cost $6.5 million, which came from state and federal transportation grants. According to the city, the transportation department expects to repair a record 235 lane miles this year.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
Baltimore officials transported 37 homeless people to an emergency overflow shelter Tuesday after a heavy snowstorm struck the region. "We had 55 encounters," said Connor Scott, a spokesman for the city's Office of Emergency Management. "Eighteen refused to come with us. " The city issued a Code Blue alert Tuesday after the storm dumped up to 11 inches in parts of the Baltimore metro area, which prompted officials to open the shelter in the 200 block of Guilford Avenue. The shelter had last opened earlier this month when the polar vortex brought an extreme cold snap to the region.
SPORTS
By Julie Scharper and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
Baltimore officials are conducting a swift and informal search for a new team to manage the city's Grand Prix race — and are declining to explain how or by what criteria they are making decisions. After severing the contract late last month with the beleaguered company that staged the inaugural race, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration has been courting potential successors. City officials declined on Monday to name the groups that are seeking to run the event — or even to say how many have signaled interest.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2012
City officials are completing a five-year deal with a new group to manage the Baltimore Grand Prix and plan to announce the terms of the deal Wednesday, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's office said Friday. "We have worked hard to learn from past experiences to ensure that this new agreement is in the best interests of taxpayers and will bring a successful, world-class sporting event that Baltimore can be proud of for years to come," Rawlings-Blake said in a statement. The mayor's office did not say who would receive the contract to operate the three-day racing festival.
EXPLORE
March 6, 2012
City officials are looking at the feasibility of establishing a community garden in Laurel, which could be available for planting in spring 2013. The effort, spearheaded by council member Frederick Smalls and supported by Mayor Craig Moe, is in response to Laurel residents who asked that a community garden be established, according to city officials. The Parks and Recreation Citizens Advisory Committee will review various requirements for a community garden, including where it could be located; the size of individual plots; and fees, rules and regulations for participants.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2014
The federal government plans to shift the cost of accepting food stamps to retailers in the coming weeks, a move that Baltimore officials and anti-hunger advocates said Tuesday could make it harder for some families to buy groceries. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and her administration are working with advocacy groups to inform merchants of the change and to help them prepare. About a third of the city's population relies on the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, known as food stamps.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
In the first month of Baltimore's tough new youth curfew, about four kids a night were picked up by police - a smaller-than-expected number that supporters say shows the law is working. City officials say the figures - which show that police issued 120 curfew violations in the program's first 30 days - indicate that parents and children have gotten the message that young people need to be inside at night. "The message has gotten out," said City Councilman Brandon M. Scott, who sponsored the curfew bill.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
Like the arrival of a Medieval plague, alien invaders are knocking on Baltimore's door. No, we are not talking about foreign armies storming the beaches or bug-eyed creatures from outer space bent on global domination. But it's almost as bad. We are referring, of course, to the recent appearance in Baltimore of the emerald ash borer, a species of voracious Asian beetle that since 2006 has killed millions of white and green ash trees in its relentless march across North America. In June, city arborists trapped a couple of the critters in Druid Hill Park, a sure sign that more are on the way. If nothing is done, some 290,000 ash trees on city owned property could be at risk of being wiped out over the next few years.
NEWS
Ian Duncan | August 16, 2014
Malik Smallwood lounged in front of Baltimore's Juvenile Justice Center, puffing on a cigarette and his recalling his teenage years spent in and out of the facility - he called it "kiddie camp. " Now 18, Smallwood said temptation loomed on the streets. Detention, in a way, was easier and saved him from that. Yet any attempts to rehabilitate him at the East Baltimore facility didn't do much good, he acknowledged. He had returned for a hearing on his latest juvenile charge. Baltimore law enforcement officials and child advocates have long questioned the efficacy and ethics of locking up juveniles accused of breaking the law, arguing it can doom them to a life of crime.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Devastated parents and distressed police and political leaders took to the streets Saturday to plead with the Waverly community to help catch the killers of 3-year-old McKenzie Elliott, whose shooting death has galvanized the city to stop a surge of violence in the past week. In a city where residents are often reluctant to cooperate or fear intimidation, their mantra was: "Say something. " "She meant a lot to everybody, especially me," the toddler's mother, 21-year-old Nina Epps, said Saturday.
FEATURES
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
For more than two weeks, 43,000 gallons of sewage spilled into the Gwynns Falls stream through a broken sewer line. Baltimore public works officials said Wednesday they had stopped the sewage's flow, which was reported on July 13 and fixed on July 28. During that time, two gallons of sewage spilled every minute into the scenic waterway as it passes through Carroll Park, officials said. The city is currently using a temporary pipe to fix the problem in the 2100 block of Washington Boulevard, while a contractor works on a permanent repair.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2011
Baltimore's police commissioner is demanding a review of the decades-old practice of funneling the city's multimillion-dollar towing business to a small circle of companies without requiring them to compete for contracts. Other city officials, including Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, are also calling for a closer look at the towing system — just days before the contract was scheduled for a two-year renewal. A federal probe that netted 30 Baltimore police officers in an alleged kickback scheme involving an uncertified tow company has also triggered scrutiny of the city's $4 million towing business.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
City engineers and surveyors will begin more regularly inspecting infrastructure such as retaining walls and streets near railroad tracks after the collapse of a wall in Charles Village last week, officials said Friday. The initiative will focus on structures not already covered by federal inspection mandates or state policies, which have long been in place for major bridges and overpasses, said William Johnson, director of the city's transportation department. "We're going to have a whole different level of focus on looking at these structures on a regular basis," Johnson said.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Percy Smith is against Baltimore's new curfew. Like many of its critics, he's fine with keeping kids off the street late at night; he's just concerned about how it will be implemented. "I'm asking from an economic perspective," he said, "will this be Fells Point or East Baltimore?" He added later that he doesn't want a curfew "just protecting the Inner Harbor. " The Govans man and more than 100 other city residents came to Morgan State University on Monday night to learn about and voice their support of or opposition to the policy, which goes into effect Aug. 8. Residents asked pointed questions to a panel of city officials that included Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts and Councilman Brandon Scott, who sponsored the law. Some worried about how police will engage youths; others asked how parents will be held accountable for allowing their children to roam the city unsupervised.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Nearly a year after the last race car whizzed down Baltimore's streets, the Grand Prix Indycar race is still costing the city money.  On Wednesday, city officials are set to authorize a $485,000 payment to P. Flanigan & Sons Inc. for road work done in 2011 and 2012 for the Baltimore Grand Prix.  The company's road work ended up being more expensive than anticipated, but city transporation officials didn't immediately bring the increased costs...
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