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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 27, 1993
LONDON -- As structural engineers sifted through the rubble of a bomb explosion that devastated the heart of London's financial district Saturday, concern was growing over the effect such attacks might have on London as a world financial center.Nobody here wants to give in to the Irish Republican Army (IRA), but it is becoming increasingly obvious that the price of a bomb is far less than the cost of replacing the glass and steel of buildings eviscerated by strategically placed explosives.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 2, 2004
LONDON -British police said yesterday that they had extended until tomorrow the detention of eight Muslims arrested this week in connection with the seizure of 1,000 pounds of a bomb-making compound near central London. At the same time, a spokesman for the police antiterrorism branch said the recent arrests in Canada and Saudi Arabia of two men of Pakistani origin - a father and son - are connected to the investigation into the possible bomb-making activities in London. The police fear that those activities might have been in support of plans to strike a prominent target in London, but a spokesman said that no direct physical evidence of bomb-making, such as detonators, timing devices or other bomb paraphernalia, was discovered in the raids.
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FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
"London: A History," by Francis Sheppard. Oxford University Press. 420 pages. $30.While dashing to catch a train in London's Waterloo Station, I spotted a placard promoting men's socks, specifically City socks, with the emphasis on the capital C. In the course of reading Sheppard's history, the origin of this locally commonplace expression dawned on me. These socks were the variety used for formal business wear in the ancient City of London, the mile-square (it includes St. Paul's Cathedral and the Tower of London)
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 17, 2002
LONDON -- The most recent spat between the U.S. government and its good friends in Britain may not be as serious as the Kyoto global warming tangle or the tiff over steel tariffs, but make no mistake about it, this disagreement is not going to be easily paved over -- and it's likely to cost both countries some money. Somewhere around $8 a day. Tired of Central London's streets being jammed bumper to bloody bumper with drivers too lazy -- or too smart -- to use the subway or the city's buses, officials here have decided that drivers inching through the heart of the city during the day must pay $8. London's mayor calls it a "congestion charge."
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | July 4, 1993
LONDON -- The small and ancient heart of London was transformed yesterday into a citadel on the Thames in defense against the Irish Republican Army.The precise square mile known as the City, which comprises today's financial district and was the site of the Roman settlement from which London grew, was virtually closed off to nonlocal traffic.Checkpoints were established on eight streets entering the area, and access through nearly 20 others blocked.Scanning cameras were mounted here and there throughout this neighborhood of banks and brokerages interspersed with sandwich shops, ancient pubs and tailors dealing almost exclusively in pin stripe suits.
FEATURES
By Bernard D. Kaplan and Bernard D. Kaplan,HEARST NEWSPAPERS | May 12, 1996
Visitors to the British capital this summer should allot some of their time to its financial district -- not for investment purposes, but to take advantage of a three-week festival of concerts, opera, drama and films ranging from the classics to the distinctly oddball.The festival, to be held between June 25 and July 14, will offer nTC more than 100 events, featuring leading performers from Europe and the United States.British music critic Lance Onslow describes it as an occasion "sparkling with diversity.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 29, 1996
LONDON -- In a video control room atop a City of London police station, Chief Inspector John Notton can punch up images from 47 cameras and view the glories of England on 39 television screens.Here, St. Paul's Cathedral. There, the Bank of England. And over there, why, it's a man in a blue van going the wrong way up a one-way street. Gotcha."Cameras create a more effective use of policing," In spector Notton says. "We can react not only to what the public sees, but what security sees."In Britain, the video cops and their cameras are on the beat.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 2, 2004
LONDON -British police said yesterday that they had extended until tomorrow the detention of eight Muslims arrested this week in connection with the seizure of 1,000 pounds of a bomb-making compound near central London. At the same time, a spokesman for the police antiterrorism branch said the recent arrests in Canada and Saudi Arabia of two men of Pakistani origin - a father and son - are connected to the investigation into the possible bomb-making activities in London. The police fear that those activities might have been in support of plans to strike a prominent target in London, but a spokesman said that no direct physical evidence of bomb-making, such as detonators, timing devices or other bomb paraphernalia, was discovered in the raids.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | April 12, 1994
LONDON -- April is the cruelest month, and T. S. Eliot is its poet.No disturbing lilacs yet breed out of the dead land of St. Paul's churchyard. But "Eliotics" bloom on the seasonal pilgrimage called "The Waste Land 1922," which winds through the ancient streets among the post-modern buildings of the City of London. The Square Mile, it's called, and it has long been the financial and banking center of London."T. S. Eliot made his working life here for many years," says Maire McQueeney, who leads about 30 Eliotic pilgrims through landmarks of "The Waste Land."
FEATURES
By Rebecca Mead and Rebecca Mead,Newsday | July 27, 1993
Stop me if you've heard this one before: The scene is the trading floor of a large bank in a major financial capital. A cocky young trader has come into the office early in the morning, intending to work on a big overseas deal from which he is confident of earning bags of money. A shoe-shine man is making the rounds, and stops at the trader's expensive footwear; the trader contemplates the lowly shoe-shiner's balding pate from his lofty vantage point -- little realizing that before the morning is out, the threads of his own life will have begun, drastically, to unravel.
NEWS
By Al Webb | May 22, 2000
LONDON - After a millennium or so of alternatively warring with and wooing kings, queens and the occasional Bible-banging religious jack, London is having a go at this democracy gig. It promptly elected as its first mayor a man who keeps newts for pets, thinks the Boy Scouts are too "militaristic" and wants to lock capitalists in stocks and throw rotten fruit at them. At first glance, picking the unreconstructed socialist that is "Red Ken" Livingstone suggests that perhaps the citizenry of "The Smoke," as Britain's historic old capital is known, haven't quite gotten the hang of this mayor business.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
"London: A History," by Francis Sheppard. Oxford University Press. 420 pages. $30.While dashing to catch a train in London's Waterloo Station, I spotted a placard promoting men's socks, specifically City socks, with the emphasis on the capital C. In the course of reading Sheppard's history, the origin of this locally commonplace expression dawned on me. These socks were the variety used for formal business wear in the ancient City of London, the mile-square (it includes St. Paul's Cathedral and the Tower of London)
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 29, 1997
LONDON -- Best-selling novelist and longtime politician Jeffrey Archer has had a life of tumultuous ups and downs. But now he's running hard for an office that doesn't even exist -- yet.He wants to become the mayor of London.That's right: This metropolitan area of 7 million, spread across 165 square miles, doesn't have a central government with an elected mayor.But London could get a city authority and mayor by 2000, under proposals expected to be published today by Britain's Labor government.
FEATURES
By Bernard D. Kaplan and Bernard D. Kaplan,HEARST NEWSPAPERS | May 12, 1996
Visitors to the British capital this summer should allot some of their time to its financial district -- not for investment purposes, but to take advantage of a three-week festival of concerts, opera, drama and films ranging from the classics to the distinctly oddball.The festival, to be held between June 25 and July 14, will offer nTC more than 100 events, featuring leading performers from Europe and the United States.British music critic Lance Onslow describes it as an occasion "sparkling with diversity.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 29, 1996
LONDON -- In a video control room atop a City of London police station, Chief Inspector John Notton can punch up images from 47 cameras and view the glories of England on 39 television screens.Here, St. Paul's Cathedral. There, the Bank of England. And over there, why, it's a man in a blue van going the wrong way up a one-way street. Gotcha."Cameras create a more effective use of policing," In spector Notton says. "We can react not only to what the public sees, but what security sees."In Britain, the video cops and their cameras are on the beat.
NEWS
By JAMES D. DILTS | March 2, 1995
How a 28-year-old trader in Singapore playing the Japanese futures market could single-handedly level what its biographer called ''perhaps the greatest of all banking dynasties'' is a mystery that may never receive a rational explanation. In the meantime, what was the nature of the colossus that fell, Baring Brothers & Co., Ltd.?I was probably one of the few outsiders of modest means who ever got a peek into the command center at Baring Brothers, purveyors of financial services to the Queen.
NEWS
By Al Webb | May 22, 2000
LONDON - After a millennium or so of alternatively warring with and wooing kings, queens and the occasional Bible-banging religious jack, London is having a go at this democracy gig. It promptly elected as its first mayor a man who keeps newts for pets, thinks the Boy Scouts are too "militaristic" and wants to lock capitalists in stocks and throw rotten fruit at them. At first glance, picking the unreconstructed socialist that is "Red Ken" Livingstone suggests that perhaps the citizenry of "The Smoke," as Britain's historic old capital is known, haven't quite gotten the hang of this mayor business.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 29, 1997
LONDON -- Best-selling novelist and longtime politician Jeffrey Archer has had a life of tumultuous ups and downs. But now he's running hard for an office that doesn't even exist -- yet.He wants to become the mayor of London.That's right: This metropolitan area of 7 million, spread across 165 square miles, doesn't have a central government with an elected mayor.But London could get a city authority and mayor by 2000, under proposals expected to be published today by Britain's Labor government.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | April 12, 1994
LONDON -- April is the cruelest month, and T. S. Eliot is its poet.No disturbing lilacs yet breed out of the dead land of St. Paul's churchyard. But "Eliotics" bloom on the seasonal pilgrimage called "The Waste Land 1922," which winds through the ancient streets among the post-modern buildings of the City of London. The Square Mile, it's called, and it has long been the financial and banking center of London."T. S. Eliot made his working life here for many years," says Maire McQueeney, who leads about 30 Eliotic pilgrims through landmarks of "The Waste Land."
FEATURES
By Rebecca Mead and Rebecca Mead,Newsday | July 27, 1993
Stop me if you've heard this one before: The scene is the trading floor of a large bank in a major financial capital. A cocky young trader has come into the office early in the morning, intending to work on a big overseas deal from which he is confident of earning bags of money. A shoe-shine man is making the rounds, and stops at the trader's expensive footwear; the trader contemplates the lowly shoe-shiner's balding pate from his lofty vantage point -- little realizing that before the morning is out, the threads of his own life will have begun, drastically, to unravel.
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