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SPORTS
February 10, 1996
1995Oct. 20: Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Maryland Stadium Authority chairman John Moag fax a proposal to the NFL that states Baltimore will retain funding for a new stadium if the league passes a legally binding resolution by the end of the year that guarantees either an expansion team or a relocated franchise.Oct. 27: Cleveland Browns owner Art Modell and Moag meet at a private terminal at BWI and sign the 30-year lease agreement that brings the team to Baltimore.Nov. 6: Modell and Glendening announce the Browns' move at a news conference at Camden Yards.
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SPORTS
February 10, 1996
1995Oct. 20: Gov. Parris N. Glendening and Maryland Stadium Authority chairman John Moag fax a proposal to the NFL that states Baltimore will retain funding for a new stadium if the league passes a legally binding resolution by the end of the year that guarantees either an expansion team or a relocated franchise.Oct. 27: Cleveland Browns owner Art Modell and Moag meet at a private terminal at BWI and sign the 30-year lease agreement that brings the team to Baltimore.Nov. 6: Modell and Glendening announce the Browns' move at a news conference at Camden Yards.
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SPORTS
November 12, 1995
Last week's announcement of the Cleveland Browns' move to Baltimore generated plenty of response, both about the move itself and about The Sun's coverage of it. Some of those letters follow:Coverage on the markIf they gave a Pulitzer Prize for intelligent, reasoned, non-"homer" coverage of a sports franchise move, your people would win it in a walk this year.As I read John Eisenberg, Ken Rosenthal, John Steadman, et al. after the Glendening/Modell announcement, I kept thinking about how rare it is to see a spirit of tough journalistic inquiry and a sense of perspective brought to one of these moments when many fans -- and sports reporters -- just want to cheer.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Ken Rosenthal, Mike Preston and Vito Stellino contributed to this article | February 9, 1996
CHICAGO -- The National Football League last night reached a tentative accord with the city of Cleveland that will bring a renamed Browns franchise to Baltimore this year and a replacement team to Cleveland by 1999.The agreement, if approved today by NFL owners, will fill a void left in Baltimore by the departure of the Colts 12 years ago and preserve for the league a market that has been as supportive as any in the country.With the agreement, all sides in the conflict declared victory."We believe the agreement achieves what we set out to get three months ago: our team, our name and our colors," said Cleveland Mayor Michael White.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Ken Rosenthal, Mike Preston and Vito Stellino contributed to this article | February 9, 1996
CHICAGO -- The National Football League last night reached a tentative accord with the city of Cleveland that will bring a renamed Browns franchise to Baltimore this year and a replacement team to Cleveland by 1999.The agreement, if approved today by NFL owners, will fill a void left in Baltimore by the departure of the Colts 12 years ago and preserve for the league a market that has been as supportive as any in the country.With the agreement, all sides in the conflict declared victory."We believe the agreement achieves what we set out to get three months ago: our team, our name and our colors," said Cleveland Mayor Michael White.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1995
Browns owner Art Modell said he will not consider renaming his team until all the legal suits with the city of Cleveland have been settled.Two weeks ago, lawyers for the Browns asked for a Dec. 4 trial date. The city, pleading a need for extensive pretrial investigation of team allegations, suggested March 3. No date has been set."Right now, we don't have a time frame because of the courts," said Modell. "Once we're able to clear ourselves of court action, we'll begin our marketing and survey campaigns."
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1995
An Ohio judge temporarily blocked the Browns yesterday from moving to Baltimore by ordering the National Football League team to abide by its current lease until a dispute over the document can be settled in a trial.The ruling, although disappointing to the team, does not prevent it from moving here eventually."We expected this. We're going to be in Baltimore, and we're going to be in Baltimore soon," said team owner Art Modell. "It was a no-win situation for us. We're still going ahead with the process of moving."
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1996
The city of Cleveland sued Maryland and the Browns yesterday for more than $300 million, alleging that the state's efforts to lure the National Football League franchise amounted to an illegal conspiracy.The action, although publicly played down by Maryland officials, set off an immediate escalation of rhetoric between the two cities less than a week before an NFL vote to decide which one gets the Browns.Cleveland Mayor Michael White spoke darkly of a conspiracy to deny his city the riches and prestige of an NFL team.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Vito Stellino contributed to this article | February 8, 1996
CHICAGO -- The city of Cleveland and the NFL were close to a deal last night that would clear the way for the Browns to move to Baltimore for the 1996 season.Both sides met for more than eight hours yesterday and made significant progress, according to one source familiar with the talks who spoke on the condition of anonymity.Cleveland Mayor Michael White was scheduled to fly in this morning, at which time the final agreement could come together, according to sources.A league spokesman, however, cautioned that a vote by the owners on the move -- scheduled for tomorrow -- might be delayed.
SPORTS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Jon Morgan contributed to this article | November 7, 1995
The city of Cleveland is pinning its hopes to block the Browns' flight to Baltimore on a lease agreement that it contends requires them to play all their home games in Cleveland through 1998.But lawyers for the Browns say the team would fulfill the obligations of the contract simply by paying off the remaining three years on the lease.Cleveland challenged the Browns' move yesterday by filing a complaint in Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court, where Judge Kenneth R. Callahan almost immediately granted a temporary restraining order barring any move until a hearing Nov. 20.The complaint was filed hours before Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced the Browns' agreement to move at a 12:30 p.m. news conference with team owner Art Modell.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Vito Stellino contributed to this article | February 8, 1996
CHICAGO -- The city of Cleveland and the NFL were close to a deal last night that would clear the way for the Browns to move to Baltimore for the 1996 season.Both sides met for more than eight hours yesterday and made significant progress, according to one source familiar with the talks who spoke on the condition of anonymity.Cleveland Mayor Michael White was scheduled to fly in this morning, at which time the final agreement could come together, according to sources.A league spokesman, however, cautioned that a vote by the owners on the move -- scheduled for tomorrow -- might be delayed.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | January 18, 1996
Any day now, we will move forward. The loss of the Colts, the indecency of expansion, the uproar over the Browns' move -- it will all be behind us. Any day now, we will have a new football team, with a new name and new colors. Peace is nearly at hand.Cleveland Mayor Michael White is toning down his rhetoric. The NFL owners are preparing to vote. The scheduled Feb. 12 trial pitting the city of Cleveland against Browns owner Art Modell almost certainly will never take place.Any day now, there will be a team in Baltimore, a promise of a new team for Cleveland, a settlement, a resolution, a conclusion -- 12 years after the Colts bolted town, setting this entire distasteful process in motion.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1996
The city of Cleveland sued Maryland and the Browns yesterday for more than $300 million, alleging that the state's efforts to lure the National Football League franchise amounted to an illegal conspiracy.The action, although publicly played down by Maryland officials, set off an immediate escalation of rhetoric between the two cities less than a week before an NFL vote to decide which one gets the Browns.Cleveland Mayor Michael White spoke darkly of a conspiracy to deny his city the riches and prestige of an NFL team.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | January 3, 1996
If they're not talking, they should be talking. And if they're not talking, they will be soon.Art Modell, shake hands with Cleveland Mayor Michael R. White.Mayor White, shake hands with Art Modell.John Moag, head of the Maryland Stadium Authority, said yesterday that he expects the Browns owner and city of Cleveland to begin exploring an out-of-court settlement shortly.Indeed, a settlement makes so much sense, the question probably is not if it will happen, but when.Maybe before Jan. 17, the date NFL owners could vote on the Browns' move.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1995
Browns owner Art Modell said he will not consider renaming his team until all the legal suits with the city of Cleveland have been settled.Two weeks ago, lawyers for the Browns asked for a Dec. 4 trial date. The city, pleading a need for extensive pretrial investigation of team allegations, suggested March 3. No date has been set."Right now, we don't have a time frame because of the courts," said Modell. "Once we're able to clear ourselves of court action, we'll begin our marketing and survey campaigns."
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1995
An Ohio judge temporarily blocked the Browns yesterday from moving to Baltimore by ordering the National Football League team to abide by its current lease until a dispute over the document can be settled in a trial.The ruling, although disappointing to the team, does not prevent it from moving here eventually."We expected this. We're going to be in Baltimore, and we're going to be in Baltimore soon," said team owner Art Modell. "It was a no-win situation for us. We're still going ahead with the process of moving."
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Michael James and Ken Murray and Michael James,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1995
CLEVELAND -- On the surface, it looked like any other Sunday in the Dawg Pound for Tim Coughlin, a retired policeman and longtime Cleveland Browns fan.Outfitted in his favorite colors, Coughlin wore orange and brown hunting fatigues, a brown fur cap, and paint on his face -- orange with a white stripe down the middle.Except this wasn't just any other Sunday in Cleveland Stadium. It was the last Sunday before Browns owner Art Modell is expected to announce he's moving the team to Baltimore for the 1996 season.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1995
CLEVELAND -- Regardless of how the judges rule, one thing has been proven in the legal blitz launched against the Cleveland Browns: The relationships between American cities and their sports teams are complex and passionate.Everyone from city hall to a stadium pizza vendor has gone to court against the team, which has announced its intention to move to Baltimore early next year.Yesterday, a county judge heard closing arguments in the city of Cleveland's case to keep the team in the city for at least two more years.
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