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By DAN RODRICKS | December 25, 2005
One Christmas night years ago, when there were still high-rise public housing complexes in Baltimore and drug gangs terrorizing them, I looked up from Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and saw a ring of lights in a high, end-of-row window, the only such lights on the stark west side of the 14-story building. I took it as a small miracle, something like a gift - the spirit alive in one of the most foreboding places in the city - and have kept it with me all these years. I look for Christmas wherever I can find it - even in that bleak, broken Baltimore that seemed for so long hopeless, bogged down in poverty, unemployment and drug addiction.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
When baseball commissioner Bud Selig said recently that Baltimore was a "very, very viable candidate" to host the 2016 All-Star Game at Camden Yards, those who have sought for the Midsummer Classic's return to the city for years received a boost to their hopes. The Orioles organization isn't commenting publicly on Selig's words, however, because it doesn't want to be viewed as campaigning for the annual event, which has been held in Baltimore twice. The American League won, 9-3, in 1993 at Camden Yards in the second season of the stadium's existence.
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NEWS
July 15, 2002
`Right now, it is more dangerous to be a child in the city of Baltimore than it is to be a police officer in the city of Baltimore." -- Mayor Martin O'Malley at a City Hall news conference Friday.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. - Just minutes into the news conference that introduced him Thursday morning as the Orioles' largest signing of a free-agent pitcher in franchise history, right-hander Ubaldo Jimenez acknowledged the club's uncommonly large investment in him. In the same breath, the 30-year-old pitcher sent a message from Florida's Gulf Coast to welcome ears up north in Baltimore, where the press conference was being televised live. “I know it took a lot for them to bring me here,” said Jimenez, flanked by Orioles manager Buck Showalter and executive vice president Dan Duquette.
NEWS
June 11, 2006
On June 7, 2006 MR. STEWART. Employee of City of Baltimore, Department of Public Works.
NEWS
March 13, 1998
ClarificationA story in Sunday's Today section on Baltimore entrepreneur Michael Lasky referred to back rent and unpaid loan payments owed the city of Baltimore by the owner of Harbor Inn Pier 5, a partnership including Lasky. The payments, totaling more than $158,000, were made the week the story went to press.Pub Date: 3/13/98
NEWS
October 25, 1995
An article in the Oct. 15 editions incorrectly reported that the city of Baltimore's settlement of a suit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union on behalf of tenants at four city housing projects that have been demolished or are slated for demolition would force residents to move out of the city.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
August 7, 1997
Scott Sedmak of Arnold will take over as chief of business services for the Anne Arundel County Public Library starting Sept. 2.He comes to the library from the city of Baltimore, where he had worked since 1990 as special assistant to the director of finance. He represented the finance director on several key projects, including the renegotiation of the city employees' benefits package and the acquisition of a $62 million multiagency radio communications systems.Pub Date: 8/07/97
NEWS
August 28, 2007
On Friday, August 24, 2007, CHARLES E. GORDON SR.; beloved husband of Mozell Gordon; father of Charles E. Gordon, Jr. (Jack), Gilda Brown and late sons, Wesley and Anthony. After finishing public school in Baltimore City, he joined the U.S. Army and Air Force. He retired in 1994 from the City of Baltimore Abandoned Vehicle Section. Services will be held on Wednesday, August 29, 2007. Wake, 10 A.M. followed by Funeral at 10:30 at The Estep Brothers Funeral Home, 1300 Eutaw Pl., Balto., MD.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER and FRED RASMUSSEN | June 11, 1991
THE mood about cruises out of Baltimore is quite upbeat, according to Harriet Segal, head of the port's customer relations, with cruises scheduled for departure to Bermuda, the Caribbean, Canada and South America. Indeed, more passenger ships are scheduled to call at the Port of Baltimore this season than at any time in the past 15 years, say port officials. But the port will have to beef up its passenger business a whole lot to match or surpass the volume before World War II.In 1930, you could go direct weekly from Pier 11 in Canton to Le Havre, France.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
The City Council decided Monday to launch an investigation into the secret audit of Baltimore's speed camera system that found error rates much higher than officials have claimed publicly. "People in the city of Baltimore are losing faith in us as elected officials," said City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young. "We have to make sure that we restore their faith. Right now, people are very frustrated. " The Baltimore Sun reported last week the findings of a never-released audit that showed the city's speed cameras likely charged motorists for thousands more erroneous tickets than previously disclosed.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
Brenda J. Clayburn, a founder and later president of the City Union of Baltimore who was also a longtime city Police Department supervisor, died Sunday of undetermined causes at her Northwest Baltimore home. She was 63. "She had recently been sick, and we are waiting the results of an autopsy," said her daughter, Shirley Y. Cooper, who lives in Baltimore. "I was very saddened to learn of the passing of Brenda Clayburn. Brenda was a strong advocate for the thousands of city employees she represented, and she cared deeply for their welfare," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | November 13, 2012
It's holiday cookie contest, time. The City of Baltimore is accepting recipes for its inaugural Holiday Cookie Challenge, which will be held on Dec. 1 at 2 p.m. in the Light Street Pavilion at Harborplace. Bakers of all skill levels can submit recipes for an opportunity to win prizes, including cash. The submission deadline is midnight on Monday, so you have all weekend to chop up your pralines. According to a press release from the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts, here are the rules in a nutshell: Recipes should be original or modified ones, and clear and concise.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
About 1,000 Baltimore-area residents are expected to receive thousands of dollars each under a landmark $175 million settlement between the U.S. Department of Justice and Wells Fargo over accusations of discriminatory lending practices. Under the terms of the deal announced Thursday, Wells Fargo also will provide $7.5 million to the city of Baltimore, which federal officials credited with first raising issues of discrimination related to bank's subprime mortgages. The city alleged Wells Fargo steered minorities into subprime loans, gave them less favorable rates than white borrowers and foreclosed on hundreds of Baltimore homes, creating blight and higher public safety costs.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
Torrential rainfall brought on by the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee flooded dozens of Baltimore-area roads, and sent the water rising out of rivers and creeks — and rescue crews have responded to more than a dozen calls of stranded drivers since midnight Thursday. And forecasters warn that more rain is on the way. Forecasters said heavy runoff will continue to spark concern into the weekend, as rivers rise behind the region's dams and threaten downstream communities. Carroll County schools delayed opening by two hours Thursday, and Charles County schools closed entirely.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2011
The Maryland Stadium Authority agreed Tuesday to study the feasibility of building a new downtown arena and expanding the Baltimore Convention Center — but directors want the city of Baltimore to help pay part of the study's $150,000 cost. Directors of the state agency voted 6-0 to approve the May 24 request from Gov. Martin O'Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to determine whether the project would be financially viable, and how much tax revenue it could generate. The panel also instructed executive director Michael Frenz to negotiate with city officials to see whether the city would make a "meaningful contribution" toward the cost of the study.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1999
Amid a sea of black and gold banners in the War Memorial Plaza, Mayor-elect Martin O'Malley will become the city's 47th mayor today in an inauguration ceremony celebrating the diversity of the city's neighborhoods.Nearly 2,000 people are expected to attend the noon ceremony, at which ethnic dance troupes and groups playing Irish, Big Band and gospel music fill the Plaza with the sounds of the city.In the evening, more than 3,000 people are expected to attend a 7 to 10 p.m. celebration at the Baltimore Convention Center, where musical groups such as the Grammy Award-winning Neville Brothers and 70 city restaurants will provide food and entertainment.
NEWS
June 4, 1996
YOUR MAY 30 editorial, ''City budget is a two-way street,'' was in my opinion misleading and unfactual. It credited the City Council with imagination and foresight by enacting an early retirement program for city employees. It also implied that Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke is not concerned about the city of Baltimore's long-term fiscal condition.To set the record straight, it was Mayor Schmoke who proposed the plan to use retirement incentives to produce an orderly downsizing of government during the next five years.
NEWS
By Larry Salzman and Bert Gall | May 23, 2011
Baltimore may be the Charm City, but there is nothing charming about its treatment of the city's fledging food truck fleet. To protect existing brick-and-mortar businesses from competition, the city recently cracked down on food truck owners who want nothing more than to earn an honest living by selling delicious food to hungry Baltimoreans. The crackdown began two weeks ago, when a city bureaucrat began aggressive enforcement of a city law that restrains food trucks from competing with brick-and-mortar restaurants by requiring them to stay 300 feet — the length of a football field — away from any retail establishment that sells similar food.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | August 22, 2009
Betty L. Johnson, an indefatigable church worker and a founder of the City Temple of Baltimore Baptist Church who also ministered to the homeless and hungry, prison inmates and pregnant teenagers, died Aug. 13 of a stroke at the Joseph Richey House hospice in Baltimore. The longtime Elgin Avenue resident was 94. Betty Law, the daughter of a Baptist minister and a homemaker, was born and raised in Merry Hill, N.C. After graduating from C. G. White High School in Powellsville, N.C., Mrs. Johnson earned a teaching degree from what is now Elizabeth City State University.
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