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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2012
One man was fatally shot early Saturday in Baltimore and a second was shot in the left elbow in separate incidents. Darrien Jackson, 22, was found shot around 1:45 a.m. in the 1300 block of Lakewood Ave. Jackson, of the 3400 block of Kenyon Ave., was pronounced dead at Johns Hopkins Hospital at 8 a.m. Around 3:40 a.m., officers responded to Sinai Hospital, where a 24-year-old shooting victim walked in. The man told police he was walking in...
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Baltimore neighborhoods Mount Vernon and Pimlico and Baltimore County's Bowley's Quarters will be the first to receive new water meters as part of system-wide overhaul, city officials said Tuesday. Beginning in September, crews will install about 5,000 new meters in the city and 5,000 in the county, officials said. The new meters will use wireless technology. Residents will be able to continuously check their water use online, the city said. The installations are part of an $83.5 million contract with Itron Inc. to upgrade Baltimore's water-meter system.
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NEWS
By Michelle Pasternack | May 29, 2002
CONVENTIONAL WISDOM holds that educational institutions benefit the city at large to an extent that justifies inconvenience to individual neighborhoods or small groups of people. But is this always true? Can institutional expansion plans threaten harm to neighborhoods that will make them less attractive, more likely to lose both population and tax base? Take, for example, the sports complex that Loyola College proposes to build in Woodberry Forest. Woodberry, adjacent to Hampden, is poised for a residential resurgence.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
An inner-city Baltimore grocery chain is closing its stores, delivering a blow to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's efforts to eliminate the city's "food deserts" and provide more residents with healthy eating options. An official of Stop Shop Save, a minority-owned business that has been a Baltimore mainstay since 1978, confirmed Tuesday that it had already closed five stores and will close the last one — on Harford Avenue in Oliver — leaving neighborhoods across the city without a convenient grocery store.
NEWS
August 5, 2003
Tonight across Baltimore, neighborhoods will participate in the 20th annual National Night Out, an observance that involves turning on porch lights and spending an evening outdoors as a way to take a stand against crime. Participation will include block parties, ice cream socials and children's events in neighborhoods such as Belair-Edison, where residents on 25 blocks plan to join in the festivities. The Baltimore Police Department's Believemobile will be on Reisterstown Road near Coldspring Lane from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Free food, refreshments, a marching band, live entertainment and a moon walk for children will be available.
NEWS
By Cheryl Casciani | October 20, 2000
GOVANS OR Waverly? Butchers Hill or Fells Point? Irvington or Violetville? Forest Park or Ten Hills? Neighborhoods all across the city compete with one another to attract buyers who are willing and able to invest in their homes and in their community. While many factors influence a homebuyer's decision of where to purchase, one important factor is the perception of the neighborhood's health and the viability of its real estate market. Mayor Martin O'Malley plans next week to announce the names of six Baltimore City neighborhoods selected to participate in his first Healthy Neighborhoods Initiative.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2005
Prospective buyers of homes in Baltimore could be eligible for $3,000 toward down payment and closing costs by attending the seventh annual Buying Into Baltimore Home-Buying Fair and Neighborhood Tours on Saturday. The event, sponsored by the Live Baltimore Home Center and the city, will offer home- ownership sessions, previews of home listings and tours of city neighborhoods. The first of two fairs this year will focus on the regions west of Charles Street in North Baltimore and west of Russell Street in South Baltimore, including the neighborhoods of Ashburton, Forest Park, Reservoir Hill, Washington Village, Edmondson Village and Hampden.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2003
Ruth W. Rehfeld, an activist who spent four decades championing city neighborhoods, died of cancer yesterday at Roland Park Place. The former Mount Vernon resident was 75. Director of Northwest Baltimore Corp. in the 1970s, Mrs. Rehfeld was recalled for her vigorous promotion of citywide racial understanding and neighborhood preservation through enforcement of zoning laws. Born Ruth Wolf in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, she left her home in 1939 to escape Nazi persecution. She lived briefly in Sweden with a foster family before moving to Baltimore and the Mount Washington residence of Bea and Sam Strouse, who sponsored her through a Jewish welfare organization.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
When Baltimore Heritage's latest series of walking tours gets under way this weekend, those who attend are in for an important lesson: Architectural excellence is not the only concern of historic preservationists.The series of five tours, to be conducted on weekends through Nov. 4, begins Sunday with "Formstone: Friend or Faux," one of the two new additions to the walking tours lineup."Our goal is to mix tours about architecture with tours about neighborhoods," says coordinator Dean Krimmel, of the non-profit group that advocates cultural and architectural preservation in the city.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
An inner-city Baltimore grocery chain is closing its stores, delivering a blow to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's efforts to eliminate the city's "food deserts" and provide more residents with healthy eating options. An official of Stop Shop Save, a minority-owned business that has been a Baltimore mainstay since 1978, confirmed Tuesday that it had already closed five stores and will close the last one — on Harford Avenue in Oliver — leaving neighborhoods across the city without a convenient grocery store.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
A proposal to sharply limit parking in part of Hampden is drawing concern from some who think the new restrictions would merely shift parking woes to other streets in the popular Baltimore neighborhood. A major redevelopment project at the Rotunda shopping mall has prompted some residents to push for a residential parking permit zone nearby. But some business owners along 36th Street worry that restrictions a couple of blocks north would make parking more difficult for everyone, including patrons of their cafes, boutiques and restaurants.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Two men were killed and another critically injured in a shooting at a recreation center playground in the city's Edgewood neighborhood Sunday, police said. Officers were dispatched to the scene, at Allendale Street and Colborne Road near the Edgewood-Lyndhurst Recreation Center, at 6:52 p.m., police said. Cedric Stancil, 18, of the 4700 block of Williston St., was pronounced dead at a local hospital at about 7:40 p.m. Four hours later, Jamal Campbell, 20, of the 2300 block of Winchester St., was also pronounced dead.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
Dean R. Wagner, a retired mathematics teacher who spent his retirement researching Baltimore residential communities, died of cancer Sept. 11 at his Original Northwood home. He was 77. He was born in Piqua, Ohio, and attended high school there. His father ran a refrigeration business and his mother was a music teacher. He earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics at Ohio Wesleyan University and had master's degrees from Ohio State University and Montclair State University in New Jersey.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Jamie Smith Hopkins and By Scott Calvert and Jamie Smith Hopkins | August 26, 2013
Close to 300 commercial properties in Baltimore are getting a property tax break this year thanks to the city's Enterprise Zone program, which has a stated purpose of attracting development and jobs to poorer areas. But while the benefits were spread among 80 city neighborhoods, most parts of town didn't see big breaks, according to a Baltimore Sun analysis of city tax records. In almost half the neighborhoods, the tax break for all owners - collectively - didn't hit $10,000.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
It's 4 p.m. when the mobile meals van pulls up to a patch of pavement behind the library at Pennsylvania and North avenues. The cardboard boxes it brings - filled with chicken sandwiches, milk and snacks - may be the first food some children have eaten all day. Even now, nearly 40 years after the federal Summer Food Service Program was first offered in Baltimore, only about half of the 46,000 children who eat free and reduced-price meals during the...
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | March 8, 2013
The banner at Greenmount Avenue and Preston Street proclaims the Lillian Jones Apartments are coming. For the past year, I've watched this building take shape in a neighborhood that needed all the help it could get. Come spring, new tenants will begin moving into these 74 units of affordable housing. As City Councilman Carl Stokes told me, Greenmount and Preston had been a "horrible corner. " That's changed as work crews complete the apartment building and rebuild numerous adjacent rowhouses.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | December 16, 2006
City officials screened a new documentary yesterday on the efforts of Baltimoreans in the 1960s and 1970s to stop an interstate from cutting through and destroying many of the Inner Harbor's historic neighborhoods. Road Wars, an 11-minute movie, was produced by the city's Heritage Area program and the Mayor's Office of Cable and Communications, and made in part with a grant from the development company Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski introduced the film yesterday at a ceremony at the Inner Harbor visitors center.
BUSINESS
By Will Morton and Will Morton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 28, 2005
Most neighborhoods with strong or improving reputations have at least one thing in common: a vibrant neighborhood association or community group. These groups often help stabilize neighborhoods that were teetering, experts say, preventing further slides and turning around a community's outlook. Through beautification efforts, public safety groups, newsletters and festivals, associations often help boost neighborhood pride and exposure among homebuyers and others. "We're no longer talking about stemming decline," said Cheryl A. Casciani, programs director of the Baltimore Community Foundation, a charity organization.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake has received a $1 million grant from The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, of Owings Mills, that will go toward building and rehabbing homes in Baltimore. “We are proud to receive support from the Weinberg Foundation to assist the financially disadvantaged and vulnerable individuals and families in our homeownership program,” said Habitat Chesapeake CEO Mike Posko. The grant will go toward rehabilitating 56 vacant properties over two years, Posko said in a statement.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
A man was shot in the leg in the Orangeville community of East Baltimore on Thursday night, according to city police. Officers responded to the 4500 block of Ashland Avenue about 9:19 p.m. for a report of a shooting and found the injured man, said Detective Angela Carter-Watson, a police spokeswoman. The community is a handful of homes dropped in the middle of — and relatively isolated within — an otherwise industrial area. It is not known for violence. The man was taken to an area hospital, Carter-Watson said.
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