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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - The words carved deeply into the marble of the terrace before the entrance proclaim the grand old Carnegie Library on Mount Vernon Square to be "A UNIVERSITY FOR THE PEOPLE." These days they should perhaps read A MUSEUM OF THE PEOPLE. The 100-year-old Beaux Arts building on the square where New York and Massachusetts avenues intersect has just reopened as the City Museum of Washington, D.C., of the Historical Society of Washington, D.C. It sits among the glittering edifices of the new Washington Convention Center like a dowager at a brassy musical.
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By Josh Noel and Josh Noel,Tribune Newspapers | July 12, 2009
ST. LOUIS - -This is a great baseball town. Cardinals fans know to applaud for a sacrifice bunt, especially when laid down by their pitcher. They know not to applaud when the other team ties the score on a sacrifice fly, even though it means an out for the opponent. They dress in red as if it were the only color on the racks. And this is a terrible baseball town. The food at Busch Stadium, which opened in 2006, is especially bad; ask 10 Cardinals fans about the best grub in the park, and eight will say the nachos, which are basically the same nachos you find at every other park.
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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1998
Baltimore is offering to sell some of its most historical properties -- including the Carroll Mansion, the Shot Tower and the 1840 House -- to local developers, hoping that the private sector can resurrect the failed City Life Museums sites.Officials from the city's Department of Housing and Community Development have sent out letters seeking proposals on the sites, stressing that bidders will be required to maintain easements and designations that are attached to the properties."The city seeks proposals that will maintain these valuable resources for Baltimore City residents and visitors," Walter J. Horton, city development administrator, said in letters sent to developers in the city this week.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun art critic | July 11, 2007
Working with local nonprofit organizations, Baltimore officials are leading talks to find new caretakers for the Fells Point Maritime Museum and the Baltimore Civil War Museum, which are slated to close in September. Last week, the Maryland Historical Society - which is operating in the black after struggling financially in recent years - announced it would close the two satellite museums to focus its resources on its main campus on West Monument Street. But Monday, representatives from the historical society, the Society for the Preservation of Federal Hill and Fells Point, the Living Classrooms Foundation and the National Park Service met with Bill Pencek - a city official who promotes local landmarks - to discuss keeping the maritime museum on Thames Street open.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 1, 2003
The Ellicott City B&O Railroad Station Museum is paying tribute to the 1927 Fair of the Iron Horse with an exhibit during its festival commemorating 175 years of railroading history. Held in Halethorpe, the 1927 fair featured examples of railroad equipment from all over the world and pageants depicting the evolution of transportation through American history. Original artifacts from the fair are on display at the Ellicott City museum, including invitations, programs, tickets, photographs and 12 pieces of centenary china released by the railroad, said Lisa Mason-Chaney, the museum's executive director.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | November 27, 2006
As the first visitors were arriving at the B&O Railroad Museum's Ellicott City Station to see its annual holiday train display, Tom Sellars was reaching over the clear plastic wall with a yardstick, pulling a few wispy strings of dried glue off the plastic trees. "He's a fanatic for details," said Tony Zingarelli, who, with Sellars and Larry Harrington, spent a combined 750 hours building the display's tunnels, towns and tracks from scratch. The details -- from the blue light at the end of a tiny worker's blowtorch to a wire fence tied by hand onto several dozen posts -- require a lot of meticulous work, but model train buffs are eager to put their imagination to the test this holiday season.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
The wheels are in motion at the B&O Railroad Station Museum for new leadership and new programs to begin in February. As of Feb. 1, the historic Ellicott City site will be managed by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Museum in Baltimore, said Courtney B. Wilson, the Baltimore museum's executive director. The station museum likely will be closed for a little more than a month to refurbish the interior and install new exhibits, Wilson said. A grand opening is tentatively planned for March 10 through 12. For almost 30 years, Historic Ellicott City (HEC)
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2004
WASHINGTON - The city got the call it had waited 33 years for yesterday. Baseball told the nation's capital it was finally time to "Play Ball!" by returning to the city the major-league game that a generation of Washingtonians had grown up without. Residents reacted first with an "Is this really happening?" sort of caution befitting a city that had endured the equivalent of three decades of rain delays waiting for baseball's return. Since the Senators left for Texas after the 1971 season, there had been so many false starts that many residents said they could not help but remember hearing how the Houston Astros were going to be moved to the city eight years ago, or how the San Diego Padres were supposedly coming a dozen years before that.
FEATURES
By Julia Furlong and Meredith James and Julia Furlong and Meredith James,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2003
In celebration of The Art of Romare Bearden exhibit, opening tomorrow at the National Gallery, Washington is holding an 11-week festival of cultural events from quilt shows to newly commissioned choreography. The Blues & Dreams: Celebrating the African-American Experience in Washington DC runs from Monday through the end of November. It was organized by Cultural Tourism DC and the Washington DC Convention and Tourism Corp. (The Bearden retrospective remains on view until Jan. 4.) Since the terrorist attacks of 9/11, festival organizers have been "looking at ways to showcase Washington as a rich cultural destination," says Kathryn S. Smith, executive director of Cultural Tourism DC. "We all have a common cause in drawing new pictures about what people expect when they come to Washington," she says.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | February 16, 1995
Jim McCarron has a vision of turning an old clapboard building in Taneytown's downtown into a showcase of the city's 241-year history."For years, I've been a proponent of an idea to start some kind of museum that would reflect the city's rich heritage and history," said Mr. McCarron, a three-term city councilman.And while for many of those years Mr. McCarron was stumped when it came to housing such a museum, a now-vacant pharmacy across the street from City Hall -- which the city acquired last year -- almost begs to be used.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | July 3, 2007
The Maryland Historical Society - which laid off 20 percent of its staff last year and saw a new director leave within four months of arriving - will close two satellite museums in Baltimore to reduce costs. The Maritime Museum in Fells Point and the Baltimore Civil War Museum in Harbor East will close Sept 1. The closures will save about $50,000 a year and allow the 163-year- old historical society to eliminate its deficit by mid-2008, said society Director Rob Rogers. "It's a small change but one that is necessary because both museums operate at a loss, and we need to ensure the future of the Maryland Historical Society," Rogers said.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | November 27, 2006
As the first visitors were arriving at the B&O Railroad Museum's Ellicott City Station to see its annual holiday train display, Tom Sellars was reaching over the clear plastic wall with a yardstick, pulling a few wispy strings of dried glue off the plastic trees. "He's a fanatic for details," said Tony Zingarelli, who, with Sellars and Larry Harrington, spent a combined 750 hours building the display's tunnels, towns and tracks from scratch. The details -- from the blue light at the end of a tiny worker's blowtorch to a wire fence tied by hand onto several dozen posts -- require a lot of meticulous work, but model train buffs are eager to put their imagination to the test this holiday season.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2006
Surrounded by cans of spray paint, a staple gun, a utility knife and jars of fuzzy green foam "ground cover," Tony Zingarelli perched on a wooden platform in the car house of the B&O Railroad Museum's Ellicott City Station and carefully glued strips of cardboard to the side of a papier mache mountain. In the coming weeks, the cardboard will be covered in layers of newspaper coated with a mixture of quick-setting drywall compound and water. That structure will then be painted, forested with miniature trees and criss-crossed by train tracks to become one part of a 252-square-foot display for the museum's Holiday Festival of Trains.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | January 6, 2006
Less than a month before the B&O Railroad Station Museum in Ellicott City will be taken over by new management, its former caretakers have published a book documenting its history. Historic Ellicott City Inc., the nonprofit preservation organization that has directed exhibits and programs at the station for 30 years, recently completed The Ellicott City B&O Railroad Station: A National Historic Landmark. "It is something we have wanted to do for a long time," said Janet Kusterer, the group's executive director.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
The wheels are in motion at the B&O Railroad Station Museum for new leadership and new programs to begin in February. As of Feb. 1, the historic Ellicott City site will be managed by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Museum in Baltimore, said Courtney B. Wilson, the Baltimore museum's executive director. The station museum likely will be closed for a little more than a month to refurbish the interior and install new exhibits, Wilson said. A grand opening is tentatively planned for March 10 through 12. For almost 30 years, Historic Ellicott City (HEC)
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | September 30, 2005
The city fraud trial of the former finance director of the Baltimore Museum of Industry was delayed yesterday because the man faces new charges of fraud in Montgomery County. Samuel T. Mercer, charged with stealing $324,000 in museum donations, was arrested on charges that he fraudulently cashed about $31,000 in checks from his new employer's bank account. The Baltimore trial is now scheduled for Dec. 9. Mercer was arrested Sunday in Montgomery County and remained in jail there yesterday awaiting a bail review, which is the reason the Baltimore case was postponed.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | January 6, 2006
Less than a month before the B&O Railroad Station Museum in Ellicott City will be taken over by new management, its former caretakers have published a book documenting its history. Historic Ellicott City Inc., the nonprofit preservation organization that has directed exhibits and programs at the station for 30 years, recently completed The Ellicott City B&O Railroad Station: A National Historic Landmark. "It is something we have wanted to do for a long time," said Janet Kusterer, the group's executive director.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2006
Surrounded by cans of spray paint, a staple gun, a utility knife and jars of fuzzy green foam "ground cover," Tony Zingarelli perched on a wooden platform in the car house of the B&O Railroad Museum's Ellicott City Station and carefully glued strips of cardboard to the side of a papier mache mountain. In the coming weeks, the cardboard will be covered in layers of newspaper coated with a mixture of quick-setting drywall compound and water. That structure will then be painted, forested with miniature trees and criss-crossed by train tracks to become one part of a 252-square-foot display for the museum's Holiday Festival of Trains.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
Life is pleasant. Death is peaceful. It's the transition that's troublesome. - Isaac Asimov, science-fiction writer Richard Hoff can tell you everything you ever wanted to know about embalming. Whether it's the workings of embalming pumps (electric nowadays, not manual), the evolution of materials (arsenic salts through about 1855, formaldehyde thereafter), or the disposition of blood after embalming ("it can go straight down the sewer," Hoff says enthusiastically), the Pikesville jeweler can dissect his favorite topic with the erudition of a scholar and all the passion of a sports nut on a barstool.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2004
WASHINGTON - The city got the call it had waited 33 years for yesterday. Baseball told the nation's capital it was finally time to "Play Ball!" by returning to the city the major-league game that a generation of Washingtonians had grown up without. Residents reacted first with an "Is this really happening?" sort of caution befitting a city that had endured the equivalent of three decades of rain delays waiting for baseball's return. Since the Senators left for Texas after the 1971 season, there had been so many false starts that many residents said they could not help but remember hearing how the Houston Astros were going to be moved to the city eight years ago, or how the San Diego Padres were supposedly coming a dozen years before that.
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