Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCity Limits
IN THE NEWS

City Limits

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 11, 2000
SEVEN YEARS ago, members of the Family Life Committee of Community United Methodist Church of Crofton were trying to think of programs they could arrange to help local families find wholesome, inexpensive entertainment in this area. Several members had young children, making them well aware that the costs of baby sitters, restaurants and movie theaters could make an evening out prohibitively expensive. After thinking about all kinds of possibilities, the group came up with an idea that has been a smashing success: Crofton City Limits, which on the second Friday of each month presents an open-microphone coffeehouse in the church's Fellowship Hall at Route 424 and Reidel Road.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater and Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
Any business that gets a city contract or major financial help from City Hall could be required to hire 51 percent of new workers from within the city limits or face a criminal sanction. Those are the terms of a new bill proposed by City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young, who believes such legislation is needed to reduce what he calls Baltimore's "stubbornly high unemployment rate. " Young introduced the "local hiring mandate" legislation Monday night to the City Council.
Advertisement
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | January 21, 1994
The Annapolis Elks Lodge, a fixture on Rowe Boulevard since 1960, has a contract to purchase a piece of property outside the city limits and move there, possibly within the next year.Vernon J. "Joe" Dorr, exalted ruler of the lodge, said yesterday that members have been looking to move for several years and that a Maryland Court of Appeals decision last week threatening their liquor license spurred them to act.The 1,360 members of Lodge No. 622 voted Wednesday to sell their 6.9 acre property on Rowe Boulevard to the state for $3.6 million.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
Baltimore's spending panel Wednesday approved a contract extension that gives a Dallas-based speed camera company a higher percentage of revenue from some tickets. The five-month deal with Xerox State and Local Solutions Inc. - formerly known as ACS State and Local Solutions - will permit the company to continue giving out speed camera tickets within the city limits through the end of 2012. The company's current contract was set to expire on July 31. The company first contracted with the city in 2003, when it began providing red light cameras.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
Annapolis is trying to get bigger -- and richer -- by snatching up property.City planners are attempting to annex several expensive parcels of land worth more than $100 million that sit just outside city boundaries near the Chesapeake Bay. The properties, from a proposed waterfront retirement home to a new luxury-home community, would be a significant addition to the $950 million in assessed property now in the city limits."
NEWS
By SUN RESEARCHER SHELIA JACKSON | October 2, 2005
1896: BANNING HOGS IN CITY On Oct. 7, 1895, the mayor and Common Council of Westminster listened as Carroll County's health officer, Dr. J. Howell Billingslea, presented evidence for the prohibition of keeping hogs within city limits. Dr. Billingslea stated that no matter how clean the hog pens are kept, they are still a breeding ground for disease and thus a public health hazard. Officials were impressed with Billingslea's report and decided to take up the issue at a future meeting. The anticipated date for the prohibition of hogs within city limits was Jan. 1, 1896.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | May 2, 1999
Hey amigos, beisbol is only a game. The arena in which to fight Cuba is the U.S. Capitol. If the NRA is not welcome in Denver, it should convene in Medellin or Pristina, where guns are respected. If we must look outside city limits for a mayor, get Ed Rendell, the best mayor Philadelphia ever had. The Block must go. Prostitution is no longer the highest and best use for the properties.
NEWS
By DAVID RUSK | June 8, 1993
Washington.--Forty percent of America's cities are programmed to fail. Gary, Camden, East St. Louis are already clinically dead. Bridgeport, Newark, Hartford, Cleveland, Detroit are on life-support systems. New York, Baltimore, Chicago, St. Louis, Philadelphia are sinking. Though seemingly healthy, Boston, Minneapolis, Atlanta are already infected.These cities, and a hundred more like them, will fail because they are programmed to be their own suburbs' poorhouses. The burden of black and Latino poverty is crushing these ''inelastic'' cities, which, for many reasons -- bad annexation laws, hostile neighbors, myopic city politics, anti-black prejudice -- have remained trapped within their city limits.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
Baltimore's spending panel Wednesday approved a contract extension that gives a Dallas-based speed camera company a higher percentage of revenue from some tickets. The five-month deal with Xerox State and Local Solutions Inc. - formerly known as ACS State and Local Solutions - will permit the company to continue giving out speed camera tickets within the city limits through the end of 2012. The company's current contract was set to expire on July 31. The company first contracted with the city in 2003, when it began providing red light cameras.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2001
After 37 years of working for the city, Westminster City Clerk John D. Dudderar is retiring. Dudderar, 65, submitted his resignation Thursday. It will be effective Feb. 1. "This wasn't a surprise to anybody," he said Friday. "I've been hinting about this for some time." Dudderar, who lives just outside Westminster city limits, started working for the city as a water meter reader in 1964. He was promoted to assistant city clerk/zoning administrator in 1969 and to city clerk/zoning administrator in 1972.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | June 9, 2009
The Dixon administration introduced legislation Monday that would halt future cost-of-living increases for Baltimore's retired police officers and firefighters, the latest turn in an ongoing effort to reform the city's ailing $1.6 billion public safety pension fund. City officials stressed that the new legislation is a "stopgap" measure intended only to prevent the already depleted fund from plummeting further while they fashion a broader fix that will ultimately include post-retirement increases.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,gettingthere@baltsun.com | April 6, 2009
Sometimes, in small ways, this Getting There gig is downright gratifying. Particularly when it can help a reader get something fixed. One example is an e-mail that came Feb. 16 from Crossan McDonald of Baltimore. For me one of the most hazardous stretches of road that I travel is Keith Avenue, the connector between Interstate 95 [the first exit after the Fort McHenry toll booth] and Broening Highway. To properly appreciate the problems, one has to travel this road at night. On any given evening, over half of the street lights are out of service, and the white paint lane markers are so faint that they are barely visible.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | April 3, 2009
Starting April 10, Baltimore's 311 Call Center will take only urgent requests for service between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m., saving the city $500,000, officials announced Thursday. Urgent requests such as animal control, water service interruptions, water main breaks, overflowing sewers or flooding basements, traffic signal outages or debris in roadways will be directly routed through a telephone tree to radio dispatchers for appropriate departments, such as Public Works or Transportation. Shrinking the hours eliminates 11 positions, but no one is expected to lose their jobs because operators are expected to transfer to other openings.
NEWS
By MILTON KENT | March 18, 2008
By all rights, Deon Queen should have been afraid Thursday. Queen and his Long Reach boys basketball teammates were facing top-ranked Lake Clifton in a state tournament matchup of schools from Baltimore City, where high quality high school basketball is considered a birthright, and Howard County, where the game is a speed bump between soccer and lacrosse. Yet there was the Lightning making up a 10-point fourth quarter deficit to beat the mighty Lakers and advance to the Class 3A championship game.
NEWS
October 18, 2007
After raising the possibility of postponing Aberdeen's Nov. 6 election, a Harford County judge gave the parties involved in a dispute over a disqualified City Council candidate two days yesterday to resolve the matter at the city level. Steven C. Johnson was ruled ineligible by the city's election board. State property tax records show that his principal residence is not within the city limits. Johnson maintains that he is a city resident, filing to run using an address in the 100 block of Post Road, and sought a court order to get his name on the ballot.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun reporter | January 3, 2007
Good news, Baltimore. You're hip and healthy. Cooking Light magazine, due on newsstands this week, lists our charming city among the top 20 that are both food-forward and lifestyle-light. The magazine, celebrating its 20th year, used a variety of measures and statistics to rate the cities, but editor Mary Kay Culpepper said the city's crab cakes are a gift to the world. "Baltimore has so much going for it," she said. "I think you know it if you live there, but I think many of our readers will be surprised.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
Carroll County commissioners said yesterday they probably would not support Westminster's plans to annex about 146 acres for a new housing development because adding up to 300 homes would drain resources and bring increased traffic to a mostly rural area. The commissioners said that annexing the unincorporated area of the county into Westminster hinged on a questionable assumption - that a single connecting road was enough to declare the property contiguous to the city limits. "We're talking about a significant increase in the density of the city of Westminster without being contiguous to the city of Westminster," Commissioner Dean L. Minnich said.
NEWS
July 18, 1991
The development of ZIP codes by the U.S. Postal Service was intended to simplify the delivery of mail. But now, it seems, the Annapolis City Council thinks a ZIP code should confer a geographic imprimatur, too.Council members voted 4-3 Monday night to encourage the postal service to limit Annapolis ZIP codes to the incorporated city's boundaries. Theoretically, backers said, that would mean someone just over the line in, say, booming, unincorporated Parole, somehow would be precluded from using "Annapolis" as a postal identity.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | December 15, 2006
City officials have narrowed the field to four teams in the contest to redesign Baltimore's Pratt Street. Teams that made the cut from an original field of 10 applicants, officials announced yesterday, are Ayers Saint Gross of Baltimore; EDSA of Columbia; Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects of Washington; and Hargreaves Associates of Cambridge, Mass. Each of the four finalists has won $25,000. Baltimore Development Corp., Downtown Partnership and the city's planning and transportation departments announced this fall that they were sponsoring a design contest to reinvigorate a 16-block stretch of Pratt from Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard east to President Street.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE | May 28, 2006
The number of steel road-plates covering construction sites -- and adding to a jarring drive in Baltimore -- has been cut in half to about 100 after a recent crackdown, a city Department of Public Works official said. In 2001, the city began tracking the steel plates, used to temporarily cover work on underground utility conduits, and started pressing contractors to remove them within 30 days. Contractors that do not report installation of plates face $50-a-day fines. Plates are used to cover sites during rush hours, according to the DPW, so that crews can quickly return to work during times of less busy traffic.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.