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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1998
Baltimore is offering to sell some of its most historical properties -- including the Carroll Mansion, the Shot Tower and the 1840 House -- to local developers, hoping that the private sector can resurrect the failed City Life Museums sites.Officials from the city's Department of Housing and Community Development have sent out letters seeking proposals on the sites, stressing that bidders will be required to maintain easements and designations that are attached to the properties."The city seeks proposals that will maintain these valuable resources for Baltimore City residents and visitors," Walter J. Horton, city development administrator, said in letters sent to developers in the city this week.
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NEWS
By Tom Wilcox, Wes Moore and Tom Bozzuto | February 4, 2013
Over the last 10 years leaders from the private, public and nonprofit sectors have begun to transform Baltimore's approach to its future. Traditional public subsidies have given way to strategic investments and tough decisions, using market-based techniques to reform our schools, rebuild our population, and make our neighborhoods safe, clean, green and vibrant. Now, the General Assembly must do its part to strengthen the city's future by passing legislation to reshape how the city makes improvements to its public school buildings.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
Through a stroke of good luck and perfect timing, Polly and Terry Smith became residents of Federal Hill six years ago. "We were wandering around town one day and saw the 'For Sale' sign on this house," Polly Smith remembered of the spacious, end-of-group home she now shares with her husband, Terry. "I lived in other cities before, and I have always loved city life. " Just as the couple thought there was no way they could afford the three-story brick home, they were approached by an interested party prepared to buy their Dulaney Valley Colonial home on Loch Raven Reservoir should they ever wish to sell.
FEATURES
By Amanda Smear and Amanda Smear,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2003
What are proud Baltimoreans to do when there's no space left on their cars' bumpers among all those "Believe" and "I City Life" stickers? Now they can make a more permanent statement by making their vehicles "rolling billboards" for the city with Live Baltimore's new "I City Life" license plates. Unveiled last week, the new vanity plates go beyond ephemeral displays of civic pride such as bumper stickers or T-shirts - but could also make a more permanent dent in your wallet. Unlike the ubiquitous "I City Life" bumper stickers, offered free to city ambassadors who support Live Baltimore and to passers-by at city events, the license plates are a fund-raising tool.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Dennis O'Brien, Jacques Kelly and Fred Rasmussen contributed to this article | April 8, 1998
An article in Friday's editions inaccurately reported that the Maryland Historical Society had acquired a third of the non-paper artifacts from the City Life Museums. The society has acquired all non-paper City Life pieces.The Sun regrets the error.In a move that leaves area historians aghast, Baltimore is planning to sell or lease some of the city's most treasured properties -- including the Carroll Mansion and H. L. Mencken House -- to dissolve its failed City Life Museums.The group of eight buildings that memorialized Baltimore's red-brick history ranges from the 1814-vintage Peale Museum to the Shot Tower.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1997
THE RECENT closing of the Baltimore City Life Museums has spawned a new effort to strengthen the local history attractions that are still open.In a hastily convened meeting yesterday, representatives of more than two dozen history-oriented museums and attractions in central Maryland appointed a steering committee to explore ways that the surviving attractions can serve their audiences better, promote themselves more aggressively and avoid the fate of...
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Marcia Myers and Joan Jacobson and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1996
Less than a year after appointing John W. Durel executive director of the Baltimore City Life Museums, the museum's board of directors has quietly pressured him out, saying it needs a leader capable of putting the museum in a brighter spotlight.Durel agreed to resign Friday after meeting privately with board Chairwoman Marcella Schuyler. He was not offered another position at the museum, where he has worked for 11 years. The decision followed numerous private discussions among board members over the past two months.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1999
He may be Maryland's new comptroller in Annapolis, but William Donald Schaefer has wasted little time letting everyone know his heart is still in Baltimore.On Monday, moments after he was sworn in before a cheering crowd in the State House, Schaefer called for the state to take over the Baltimore Convention Center.Yesterday, even as he began scrutinizing state contracts, Schaefer had his staff prepare a letter urging Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke not to sell some of Baltimore's most treasured historical properties that made up the failed City Life Museums.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | February 29, 1996
A SOON-TO-OPEN museum addition is the latest building to be illuminated at night as part of the "Brighten Baltimore" campaign.The Morton K. Blaustein City Life Exhibition Center, opening April 12 as the newest phase of the Baltimore City Life Museums at Lombard and President streets, will be lighted in a ceremony that begins at 5:30 p.m. today.Its western facade -- featuring hundreds of cast-iron pieces salvaged from the old G. Fava Fruit Co. building -- will be illuminated each evening as part of a citywide effort to light the downtown skyline at night.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1996
A green vinyl armchair with yellow piping seems an unlikely treasure, but to Jenny Heim it was the find of the year. More precious than the chartreuse plastic nut dishes. Or even the ceramic ashtray with matching cigarette lighter.Ms. Heim is still in search of Fifties-style Monopoly games, plastic drapes, vinyl ottomans and Howdy Doody paraphernalia: Things that many view as woefully passe -- or as just plain junk. She wants to put them in a museum.Ms. Heim is a part of a team at the Baltimore City Life Museums that is preparing a sweeping depiction of the city's history.
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