Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCity Kids
IN THE NEWS

City Kids

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 12, 2013
As U.S. citizens, we have grown so comfortable with air conditioning that we tend to forget about its benefits. We take for granted in the brutally hot and humid months that the automobile we drive, the place we call home, the grocery store, our work places, all have air conditioning. I cannot imagine how stiflingly unbearable it would be to live in a non-air-conditioned row house in Baltimore City during a hot spell (like the one we are currently muddling through). The residents seek so-called relief in the streets.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 14, 2014
Inner city kids appear to suffer more from food allergies than the general population, according to new research lead by Johns Hopkins Children's Center . Researchers had already found that kids in four large cities are more vulnerable to asthma and environmental allergies. The new findings, which were published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology , show 10 percent of the kids were allergic to milk, eggs or peanuts, the three most common food allergens. Just six percent of kids nationally are allergic to these foods, according to National Institute of Health estimates.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 25, 2013
The latest attack on Baltimore City children of color, exacerbated by Del. Shawn Tarrant's bill aimed at dually penalizing our youth for riding recreational off-road vehicles - both through the courts and the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration - is a good example of why we need to fully dissect the hundreds of bills affecting the lives of area residents coming from Annapolis each year and challenge those officials who have shown that they don't have...
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Those who qualify for free and reduced price lunch in Baltimore City schools - 84 percent of students -- have few options in the summer. But a federally-sponsored program will bring food to many of these kids beginning Tuesday, when Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the Family League will announce goals that include an increase in meals to 1.5 million, up from 1.24 million last summer. As part of the program, Mobile Meals brings food twice a day to young children and teens in underserved areas of the city, and officials are seeking changes to the program to increase the meals to three a day. "There is no excuse for any child in our city to worry where their next meal will come from, and they should never, ever go to bed hungry," said Rawlings-Blake in a statement.
NEWS
By LISSA ROTUNDO | May 5, 1995
The other day I met a guidance counselor at a county elementary school. When I remarked that I hadn't realized that elementary schools had guidance counselors, she replied, ''We have mostly city kids at our school.''''City kids?'' I asked. ''I thought you said you worked in the county.''''I do,'' she replied, ''but we have city kids.''''You mean they live in the city and go to school in the county?'' I asked.''No,'' she answered, ''but they're just like city kids.''As a veteran city school teacher, I was upset by this exchange.
NEWS
September 13, 2012
Conservative columnist Marta Mossburg's Sept. 13 article "City's schoolchildren deserve a real choice" prompts a question for her about her advocacy for using taxpayer money to pay for kids to go to private schools. When she says a "real choice," does she mean it? How about the choice for Baltimore City kids to go to better public schools in surrounding counties? Or is she just interested in boosting private schools and undermining public ones? Back in 1995 David Rusk wrote a book called "Baltimore Unbound" in which he pointed out that the decades of white and middle class black flight from cities has left concentrations of poor African American families behind, where children grow up in a world very different from the one we're accustomed to in the suburbs.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
Plans to expand the youth curfew signal a recognition that kids in Baltimore City need more community services, employment opportunities and structured recreational activities ( "Council approves stricter curfew," June 3). This recognition offers a chance to meaningfully empower kids and connect them with the services they need. However, the planned expansion of the curfew will increase contact between kids and police and is likely to undo successful efforts to reduce the inappropriate use of secure detention in Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
There was a time in Baltimore city when players from public and private high schools competed regularly on the baseball field. Meanwhile, in the stands, their parents — both black and white — would shake hands, share banter and discover that, maybe, they weren't so different after all. That scenario, though 20 years old, is what city officials hope to resurrect by creating a citywide baseball tournament next month that will bring together eight...
NEWS
August 6, 1993
A photo caption in yesterday's editions of The Sun and The Evening Sun incorrectly identified one of the girls visiting the Carroll County Farm Museum. The girl on the right should have been identified as Melissa Hamlin.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
June 24, 1992
A young man of our acquaintance was among the thousands of eligible Baltimore youngsters who had not registered with the city jobs program by the deadline for applications that passed earlier this month. He desperately wanted a summer job, but somehow never got around to filling out the forms available at his high school counseling office.On Monday, he got a second chance when President Bush signed a $1.1 billion emergency urban aid bill to help pay for the cleanup after the Los Angeles riots and Chicago floods as well as finance more than 400,000 summer jobs for poor youngsters.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
Plans to expand the youth curfew signal a recognition that kids in Baltimore City need more community services, employment opportunities and structured recreational activities ( "Council approves stricter curfew," June 3). This recognition offers a chance to meaningfully empower kids and connect them with the services they need. However, the planned expansion of the curfew will increase contact between kids and police and is likely to undo successful efforts to reduce the inappropriate use of secure detention in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Goudie | January 22, 2014
Childhood obesity is an epidemic in Baltimore, with the first signs seen in many children before they even reach traditional school age. Sixteen percent of the pre-kindergartners, ages 4 and 5, at one Northwest Baltimore public school were overweight, according to a 2013 survey of 150 students, and 12 percent of them were considered obese (above the 95th weight percentile for their ages and heights). Nearly half of the fourth-graders at that same school were overweight, and one in five of them was obese.
NEWS
September 23, 2013
On the face of it, you can hardly blame City Council members for voting unanimously last week to block Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's proposal to transfer $100,000 from the Department of Recreation and Parks to the State's Attorney's Office. The optics of taking money away from programs that help city young people stay out of trouble and giving it instead to an agency that puts them in jail were beyond awful. On top of that, many council members and their constituents were rightly taken aback by the idea the city would raid parks and recreation's piggy bank whenever it needs extra cash for other projects.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
As U.S. citizens, we have grown so comfortable with air conditioning that we tend to forget about its benefits. We take for granted in the brutally hot and humid months that the automobile we drive, the place we call home, the grocery store, our work places, all have air conditioning. I cannot imagine how stiflingly unbearable it would be to live in a non-air-conditioned row house in Baltimore City during a hot spell (like the one we are currently muddling through). The residents seek so-called relief in the streets.
NEWS
May 5, 2013
Regarding the recent debate over dirt bikes, as president of my community association I can assure you that while the riders' antics may seem "cool" to their peers, the rest of us see them as noisy and a danger to motorists ("Don't penalize city kids for riding dirt bikes," April 25). I personally have had two frightening near collisions with these lawbreakers in recent years. That is why I would welcome legislation making it mandatory for retailers who sell dirt bikes to prominently display signs informing potential buyers that it is illegal to drive dirt bikes inside the city limits.
NEWS
April 29, 2013
We haven't had gangs of youth riding dirt bikes in the central business district recently, but before that it was commonplace. City Circuit Court Clerk Frank M. Conaway Sr., however, apparently doesn't think that was a problem ("Don't penalize city kids for riding dirt bikes," April 26). A year ago groups of 25 to 35 youths on dirt bikes would routinely come into downtown in the evenings and wreak havoc on residents. The noise from these vehicles, whose engines are not muffled, was astounding because it was amplified by the walls of nearby buildings.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 13, 2006
Dear Oprah: I know how you can help Baltimore City public school students without giving money to Baltimore City public schools. I'm sure you can afford the sum I have in mind. You could hock a couple of rings, or some shoes, and make the donation -- and make a difference. Make a difference without making a donation to the city schools. You apparently thought about doing that but decided it would be a waste of money. How did you put it for WBAL-TV the other day? "You might as well pee on it."
NEWS
September 23, 2013
On the face of it, you can hardly blame City Council members for voting unanimously last week to block Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's proposal to transfer $100,000 from the Department of Recreation and Parks to the State's Attorney's Office. The optics of taking money away from programs that help city young people stay out of trouble and giving it instead to an agency that puts them in jail were beyond awful. On top of that, many council members and their constituents were rightly taken aback by the idea the city would raid parks and recreation's piggy bank whenever it needs extra cash for other projects.
NEWS
April 25, 2013
The latest attack on Baltimore City children of color, exacerbated by Del. Shawn Tarrant's bill aimed at dually penalizing our youth for riding recreational off-road vehicles - both through the courts and the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration - is a good example of why we need to fully dissect the hundreds of bills affecting the lives of area residents coming from Annapolis each year and challenge those officials who have shown that they don't have...
NEWS
September 13, 2012
Conservative columnist Marta Mossburg's Sept. 13 article "City's schoolchildren deserve a real choice" prompts a question for her about her advocacy for using taxpayer money to pay for kids to go to private schools. When she says a "real choice," does she mean it? How about the choice for Baltimore City kids to go to better public schools in surrounding counties? Or is she just interested in boosting private schools and undermining public ones? Back in 1995 David Rusk wrote a book called "Baltimore Unbound" in which he pointed out that the decades of white and middle class black flight from cities has left concentrations of poor African American families behind, where children grow up in a world very different from the one we're accustomed to in the suburbs.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.