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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
A federal grand jury has indicted a pair of Washington men, charging them with taking $1.4 million from Baltimore's public housing authority and electronically transferring the funds to a nonexistent business, according to authorities. The men, William Alvin Darden and Keith Eugene Daughtry, were indicted last month on charges of bank fraud, according to federal court documents. The pair transferred money from the Housing Authority of Baltimore City's fund for Section 8 residents to a fictitious contracting company 30 times over a two-month period last year, according to the documents.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2013
The relatives of five people who were killed in a Baltimore house fire last year sued a landlord and the city housing authority in Circuit Court on Wednesday, claiming that failure to fix a faulty furnace or install smoke detectors led to the fatal blaze. Nancy Worrell, 55, was killed along with four young children in the October fire at 5601 Denwood Ave. The Housing Authority of Baltimore City was paying a portion of the rent on the home through the Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher program, and the lawsuit contends that housing authority inspectors should have forced landlord Paul Stanton to fix a malfunctioning furnace in the home and install smoke detectors.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
Baltimore's housing bureau does not have to pay a $2.6 million jury award to two siblings who say they were poisoned by lead paint when they lived in public residences as toddlers, a Maryland intermediate appellate court ruled Thursday. The decision, written by Judge Kathryn Grill Graeff of the Court of Special Appeals, hinges on the siblings not having filed notice of their claim within 180 days of their injury, as required by the state statute that governs personal injury suits against local governments.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
An Upper Marlboro man was convicted Monday of orchestrating a scheme to steal nearly $1.4 million from the Baltimore Housing Authority, the U.S. Department of Justice said. Daren Kareem Gadsden, aka "D," was a designated landlord in the city's Section 8 rental program for low-income individuals, now the Housing Choice Voucher Program, and rented to a person in that program in 2009. Authorities said that was how he was able to get access to the housing authority's bank account information.
NEWS
November 11, 1995
"WE DON'T DO this voluntarily, we will do it because we were ordered to do it," Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said after the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development told the city Housing Authority to drop NOI Security as a provider of high-rise patrols. The mayor neglected, though, to mention the prime reason for this order: City officials' defiance of federal law made a mockery of the bidding process.HUD found that Baltimore officials had "violated the federal procurement regulations" in selecting NOI over Wells Fargo Guard Services.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2002
A Baltimore Circuit Court jury awarded $630,000 yesterday to a 9-year-old boy who suffered lead poisoning while he lived in a East Baltimore rowhouse owned by the city housing authority. But getting the full payment may be difficult for the boy's family because the award exceeds the authority's $500,000 insurance limit. J. Marks Moore III, who represents the Housing Authority of Baltimore City in lead paint cases, said he did not know how complex legal issues involving the city's insurance coverage would be resolved.
NEWS
By Staff Report | January 5, 1993
Bill Toohey, the spokesman for the Baltimore Department of Housing and Community Development and the city housing authority, has resigned to become press secretary for Maryland Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski.The 47-year-old Mr. Toohey has been the spokesman for the department and the authority -- city and federal housing agencies that are intertwined by federal funds -- since April 1988.Mr. Toohey left his position briefly in October 1990 to become press secretary for Howard County Executive Elizabeth Bobo but returned in December 1990 after Ms. Bobo was unexpectedly defeated by Charles I. Ecker.
NEWS
October 13, 2000
PATRICIA PAYNE'S departure as city housing commissioner only 10 months into the O'Malley administration is troublesome. It's overshadowed, though, by Mayor Martin O'Malley's failure, so far, to clearly enunciate a housing policy for Baltimore. The mayor inherited from the Schmoke administration a nettlesome public housing settlement with the American Civil Liberties Union. Mr. O'Malley would like to get rid of it but doesn't know how. Meanwhile, almost every aspect of management of the city housing authority has turned out to be a nightmare.
NEWS
August 17, 1995
If everything goes as planned on Saturday, the six 42-year-old buildings known as Layette Courts will be reduced to rubble in about 20 seconds. Yet the demolition of these antiquated and crime-ridden high-rise towers is the easy part.The hard part is making sure the new $115-million townhouse and garden apartment community that will rise on the site near the main post office won't become as deteriorated and unsafe as Lafayette Courts. Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III maintains that townhouses and rowhouses work better in Baltimore than high-rises.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2001
The Housing Authority of Baltimore City's long-troubled police agency lost its accreditation yesterday, prompting authority officials to lobby the federal government in an effort to keep $618,000 in funds given to the department. Housing authority police officials conceded that improvements are needed and said they are working to correct problems identified by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies. Federal housing funds are given to police agencies that have either met or are attempting to meet accreditation standards.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
William J. Schmidt, a former department store buyer who later became director of administration for the Housing Authority of Baltimore City, died Monday at his Bel Air home of complications from Parkinson's disease. He was 79. The son of a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. actuary and a homemaker, William Joseph Schmidt was born in Baltimore and raised on Aisquith Street. He was a 1951 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School in Irvington and earned a bachelor's degree in 1955 in business administration from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
By now, Del. Samuel I. Rosenberg says he expected big news from the Housing Authority of Baltimore City - that it had found a way to resolve the millions of dollars in court-ordered judgments it owes former public housing residents who suffered lead paint poisoning as children. Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano told him in early January that the agency was "close to an agreement with the feds to work this thing out," Rosenberg recalled. Based on Graziano's assurance, Rosenberg says, he held off pursuing a remedy in the legislature when the General Assembly's annual session began days later.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
Baltimore's housing bureau does not have to pay a $2.6 million jury award to two siblings who say they were poisoned by lead paint when they lived in public residences as toddlers, a Maryland intermediate appellate court ruled Thursday. The decision, written by Judge Kathryn Grill Graeff of the Court of Special Appeals, hinges on the siblings not having filed notice of their claim within 180 days of their injury, as required by the state statute that governs personal injury suits against local governments.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
Baltimore Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano defended the city's public housing authority Friday, a day after a U.S. senator began an inquiry into what he termed "a wide range of allegations, including possible conflicts of interest, fraud, waste and abuse of taxpayers' monies. " Graziano said in a statement that "there have been a number of unfair accusations made against" the Housing Authority of Baltimore City. "We are confident that there has been no wrongdoing," he said. Sen. Charles E. Grassley of Iowa, the Judiciary Committee's ranking Republican and one of the Senate's most active watchdogs, sent a letter Thursday to federal Housing Secretary Shaun S. Donovan requesting reams of documents.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
A federal grand jury has indicted a pair of Washington men, charging them with taking $1.4 million from Baltimore's public housing authority and electronically transferring the funds to a nonexistent business, according to authorities. The men, William Alvin Darden and Keith Eugene Daughtry, were indicted last month on charges of bank fraud, according to federal court documents. The pair transferred money from the Housing Authority of Baltimore City's fund for Section 8 residents to a fictitious contracting company 30 times over a two-month period last year, according to the documents.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
The Maryland Senate directed Baltimore's public housing authority Friday to explain how it will pay nearly $12 million it owes in court judgments to residents poisoned by lead paint. A spokesman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said she is willing to work with lawmakers on "thoughtful and constructive" solutions that don't diminish the city's ability to serve 25,000 low-income families. The Senate issued the direction in a last-minute amendment to the state's $1.45 billion capital budget.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Marcia Myers contributed to this article | March 2, 1995
Pledging a thorough investigation into the troubled $25.6 million program to fix up homes for the poor, Baltimore City Council Vice President Vera P. Hall is calling local and federal housing officials, as well as lawyers and tenants, to a hearing next week.Mrs. Hall, who chairs the council's housing committee, said she is "trying to cover the waterfront" in soliciting testimony from people involved in the no-bid repair program that has come under fire for shoddy work and inflated costs. The hearing is scheduled for 10 a.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2003
Baltimore's major subsidized housing program for the poor continues to fail to meet federal standards but has improved its record keeping and trimmed its administrative costs since a scathing audit in 2001 said the program was "barely functional." The city housing authority sent out an upbeat news release last week promoting its success in reaching a "milestone" Nov. 10 when Bill Tamburrino, the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development's local director of public housing programs, wrote a letter closing out some problems raised by the March 2001 audit.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
Elias Augustus "Tink" Dorsey, a seasoned city administrator whose career spanned from educator to serving as deputy commissioner of the Housing Authority of the City of Baltimore, died Monday of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Woodlawn resident was 69. Dr. Dorsey, the son of a contractor and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Pimlico neighborhood. The origin of Dr. Dorsey's nickname of "Tink" or "Tinker," which he had picked up in his childhood and remained with him for the rest of his life, derived from a keen interest in tinkering with and fixing all variety of gadgets, said Daniel P. Henson III, the former city housing commissioner, who became friends with him when both were students at what is now Morgan State University.
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