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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | June 5, 1995
Isabelle Ruth Carter, a former city Health Department worker who was known in her East Baltimore neighborhood for her willingness to help neighbors, died Wednesday of kidney failure at Good Samaritan Hospital. She was 72.Mrs. Carter, whose maiden name was also Carter, retired from the health department in 1986 where she had worked conducting surveys on elder and foster child care for about a year.Earlier, she had worked as a physician's assistant from 1980 to 1985 at the East Baltimore Medical Plan facility at Ensor and Aisquith streets, at the time the city's oldest and largest health maintenance organization.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Falls Prevention Week runs from Sept. 21-27, and the Baltimore City Health Department is supplying residents age 60 and over, caregivers and disabled residents with a free night light and fall prevention information. Officials in Maryland and beyond have been working to reduce falls among seniors. They are considered a serious problem, threatening their independence and quality of life of older people. According to the city health department, falls are the leading cause of injury-related hospital visits among Maryland's seniors.
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NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | February 1, 2006
The number of children in Baltimore with toxic levels of lead in their blood dropped 17 percent from 2004 to 2005, the city Health Department announced yesterday. Last year, 135 children were identified as having 15 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood, compared with 162 children who had the same levels in 2004. While there is no known safe level of lead exposure for children, exposure to large doses can cause death and brain problems. Chronic, low-level lead exposure can cause learning disabilities and a decreased IQ. The health department has also issued new regulations lowering the blood level threshold at which families with children exposed to lead can receive assistance from the city - from 15 to 10 micrograms per deciliter.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
A former city school board member and city government worker who is accused of lying about his resume will be tried in court on fraud charges this fall. Anthony A. Hamilton, 35, who resigned from the school board as well as from the city's Health Department last August, used another man's Social Security number and student identification number to pretend to have degrees he didn't earn, prosecutors said in charging documents. Hamilton, who faces six fraud-related charges, was arraigned on Monday and has a trial scheduled for Oct. 27. His attorney could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
August 21, 1996
An Aug. 20 editorial incorrectly stated that Metropolitan Eye Associates had a contract with the Baltimore City Health Department. In fact, the contract is with Baltimore Medical System, which receives payments for MEA's services from the city Health Department.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 8/21/96
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | January 5, 1994
The man who directs Baltimore's tuberculosis, AIDS and sexually transmitted disease clinics has been forced to resign in the wake of a job shake-up involving 90 clinic workers.Dr. John Lewis, assistant commissioner for preventive medicine and epidemiology, charged yesterday that top officials in the city health department had made him the scapegoat for a controversy that was not his fault.He said that Health Commissioner Peter Beilenson and Deputy Commissioner Elias Dorsey asked him Monday morning to vacate his office by Friday.
NEWS
By John-John Williams and John-John Williams,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | May 25, 2009
Baltimore has its first three confirmed cases of H1N1 virus, also known as swine flu, the city health department said Sunday. All of the three people infected with the virus are adults, but not elderly, according to health officials. One of the people who fell ill is in a local hospital. Health officials have released few details about the infected individuals, citing confidentiality. The three cases are still under investigation, according to Dr. Anne Bailowitz, medical director for Environmental Health and Emergency Programs at the City Health Department.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 20, 2008
Glenn Miles Bosley Sr., a retired city Health Department inspector and lifelong Sparks resident, died Sunday of undetermined causes at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 88. Mr. Bosley was born and raised in Sparks and graduated from Sparks High School in 1937. He earned a bachelor's degree in agriculture from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1941. He worked as a health inspector for the Baltimore City Health Department for 33 years before retiring in 1989. Earlier, he had worked at Black & Decker Corp.
NEWS
November 29, 2003
Josephine Marie Robinson-Paige, a retired city Health Department aide, died Monday of inflammatory breast cancer at her Northwest Baltimore home. She was 73. Born Josephine Marie Robinson in Emporia, Va., where she attended schools, she moved to Baltimore about 50 years ago. She conducted hearing and vision screenings for the city Health Department at public schools. She retired about 20 years ago. Mrs. Robinson-Paige enjoyed collecting salt and pepper shakers and dolls. She also solved word puzzles.
NEWS
February 27, 1999
Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, Baltimore's health commissioner, took himself out of the running yesterday for the post of District of Columbia health director. Beilenson, 39, had been recruited for the job and was one of two finalists. He said he lost interest because the process had dragged on for 3 1/2 months."It was putting my family in limbo and causing some disruption in the city health department," Beilenson said. "I just decided that with the chaos in D.C. right now and other factors, I should stay in Baltimore."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
Jeanne D. Granofsky, a registered nurse who worked for 30 years with the Baltimore City Health Department, died Tuesday at the Bel Air Health and Rehabilitation Center. She was 84. The daughter of a furniture maker and a homemaker, the former Jeanne Disharoon was born and raised in Fruitland. After graduating from Wicomico High School, she attended what was then Salisbury State Teachers College for a year before enrolling at the Union Memorial School of Nursing, from which she graduated in 1949.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2013
Jennifer N. Conyers, a Baltimore City Health Department research analyst who enjoyed making jewelry and photography, was found slain Friday in her Northwest Baltimore home. She was 32. Ms. Conyers' body was discovered in the basement of her home in the 5700 block of Highgate Drive by city firefighters. Jennifer Nicole Conyers, the daughter of Harry Anthony Conyers, a Baltimore Detention Center case manager, and Alverta Elzine Moore Conyers, a retired Baltimore Sun copy editor, was born in Baltimore and raised on Key Avenue in Mount Washington.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2012
Effa Lee "Effie" Roehrle, a homemaker who earlier had been a secretary, died July 20 of heart failure at the Dove House in Westminster. She was 77. Effa Lee "Effie" Saxton was born in Birmingham, Ala., and moved with her family to Baltimore in 1940. After graduating from Milford Mill High School in 1954, she attended the Bard Avon School, a Baltimore business and secretarial school. She was married in 1959 to Veronn Roehrle, and worked as a secretary for the Baltimore City Health Department until 1962, when she left to raise her family.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Franklin Lance knows his West Baltimore neighborhood can be great — located near to Druid Hill Park, it's home to the city's biggest shopping mall, a public university, and a network of active churches and community groups. But like so many areas of Baltimore, public safety looms large as an obstacle to growth. So he and his neighbors cheered Monday the announcement that the Greater Mondawmin area has been chosen by the city health department for an expansion of the violence mediation program Safe Streets.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
Elias Augustus "Tink" Dorsey, a seasoned city administrator whose career spanned from educator to serving as deputy commissioner of the Housing Authority of the City of Baltimore, died Monday of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime Woodlawn resident was 69. Dr. Dorsey, the son of a contractor and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Pimlico neighborhood. The origin of Dr. Dorsey's nickname of "Tink" or "Tinker," which he had picked up in his childhood and remained with him for the rest of his life, derived from a keen interest in tinkering with and fixing all variety of gadgets, said Daniel P. Henson III, the former city housing commissioner, who became friends with him when both were students at what is now Morgan State University.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2010
The Baltimore City Health Department reported three cases of mold violations at the luxury Harborview Condominiums overlooking Baltimore's Inner Harbor. The violations among the three units range from water-damaged ceilings and water-damaged floors to possible mold coming out of the ventilation system "caused by lack of maintenance to the exterior of the property as well as the ventilation system," the May 17 citation states. The three units, located at 100 Harborview Drive, had mold and the Health Department notified the condo board, giving it 10 days to repair the problem.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
A former city school board member and city government worker who is accused of lying about his resume will be tried in court on fraud charges this fall. Anthony A. Hamilton, 35, who resigned from the school board as well as from the city's Health Department last August, used another man's Social Security number and student identification number to pretend to have degrees he didn't earn, prosecutors said in charging documents. Hamilton, who faces six fraud-related charges, was arraigned on Monday and has a trial scheduled for Oct. 27. His attorney could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | December 23, 1994
Federal officials have cited the Baltimore City Health Department for deficiencies in its administration of a grant worth $1.5 million over three years for the care of AIDS patients and are considering disbursing the money through a community-based AIDS clinic.The grant, funded through the Ryan White CARE Act, pays for early intervention services such as testing, diagnosis and treatment of people infected with the AIDS virus.The money has been distributed by the city to five programs that serve thousands of patients annually.
NEWS
By Sarah Fisher and Sarah Fisher,sarah.fisher@baltsun.com | June 23, 2009
Baltimore will receive $15.7 million in federal stimulus funds for an initiative to improve energy efficiency at the homes of more than 2,000 low-income city families, Mayor Sheila Dixon announced Monday. With the money, the city expects to weatherize 700 homes each year for the next three years, said Scott Peterson, a spokesman for the mayor. Weatherization involves sealing leaks, updating windows and shoring up insulation to keep houses cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter.
NEWS
By John-John Williams and John-John Williams,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | May 25, 2009
Baltimore has its first three confirmed cases of H1N1 virus, also known as swine flu, the city health department said Sunday. All of the three people infected with the virus are adults, but not elderly, according to health officials. One of the people who fell ill is in a local hospital. Health officials have released few details about the infected individuals, citing confidentiality. The three cases are still under investigation, according to Dr. Anne Bailowitz, medical director for Environmental Health and Emergency Programs at the City Health Department.
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