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Editorial from The Record | December 6, 2013
It's been more than a quarter of a century since the last time plans were in the works for a major upgrade for the Havre de Grace Branch of the Harford County Public Library. Back then, Havre de Grace had fallen on hard times and suffice it to say the community was in need of a major lift. A proposal was floated that would have put a major library branch, plus the library system headquarters, on Revolution Street in what was then a vacant building, but would eventually be redeveloped into the professional center it is today.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
The driver of a vehicle that crashed outside City Hall and killed a city worker was traveling up to 115 mph before he entered downtown streets followed by a state trooper, according to a police report that for the first time details the investigation into the April crash. Johnny Johnson's car crashed through a light pole, hit 45-year-old finance employee Matthew Hersl and broke a tree before overturning, the report said. Police found heroin rocks, a burnt spoon, a smoking pipe and a syringe inside the vehicle.
NEWS
November 29, 2013
Dan Rodricks is firing on all cylinders again in his recent column championing the idea that the Inner Harbor should not just be a tourist attraction and something that the city can squeeze ever more revenue out of but something that becomes a part of city dwellers' lives ("A remade Inner Harbor should be for locals," Nov. 24). When it truly is a part of city dwellers' lives, the tourists will follow. Memo to City Hall: The ultimate viability of the city lies with its livability factor, not with its tourist attractions.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Three colorful paintings that served as a backdrop for nearly two decades' worth of political debates at Annapolis City Hall -- until they were removed this summer -- are going back up. The trio of paintings by Annapolis artist Lee Boynton were commissioned in the mid-1990s and depict an interpretation of historical scenes from the city's founding. They hung in City Hall's council chambers, behind the mayor's seat. The paintings were removed this summer when the chambers were renovated.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
When Mark and Lisa Struble bought their Little Italy condo last year, they were attracted by the open layout, proximity to the waterfront - and the promise of a steep property tax break into 2016. But in July they got a shock in the mail from the city Finance Department: Their tax credit was suddenly gone. And their annual tax bill, which they thought would be around $1,800, had soared to more than $15,400 - a 760-percent increase. "I was incredulous," said Mark Struble, who moved with his wife from Ohio after she got a job in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Justin George, Justin Fenton and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts wants to stop sending officers out on low-priority 911 calls, expand foot patrols and create a unit focused on investigating incidents in which police use force. He proposes assigning homicide detectives to city neighborhoods, beefing up investigative units and sending elite plainclothes officers to more police districts. He wants to install tiny cameras on officers' uniforms and put computer tablets in their hands. A year on the job, Batts on Thursday unveiled an overarching crime-fighting plan he said would bring "much-needed" and "long-sought-after reform" in a department he said has relied too heavily on outdated procedures and technology.
NEWS
November 19, 2013
As a faithful subscriber to The Sun, I am totally perplexed and disappointed that The Sun did not tell the full story about Baltimore's speed camera contract ( "City rethinks camera contract," Nov. 17). Your news story, for no good journalistic reason, neglected to mention several very material and controlling facts related to the city's most serious contract performance dispute with its incumbent speed and red light camera contractor, Brekford Corp., of Anne Arundel County. The Sun's story neglected to disclose the important fact that I personally filed a bid protest against the Board of Estimates' initial consideration and contract award to Brekford on Nov. 7, 2012, and again on April 10, 2013, when the Board of Estimates totally unlawfully voted to play "favoritism" with Brekford and amended its speed and red light cameras contract to provide an astonishing additional $2.2 million to Brekford as payment for 72 speed camera units, which the facts clearly show were already included and provided for in Brekford's initial bid proposal to the city, favorably voted on and approved by the Board of Estimates, on Nov. 7, 2012.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
After 19.5 hours of reviewing ballots, more than 20 official challenges and numerous questions about signatures and postmarks, Annapolis voters still did not know who their next mayor would be when elections officials called it quits at 4:35 a.m. Friday after a marathon meeting. The Annapolis Board of Canvassers will resume their meeting at noon Friday, when they'll review more than 100 provisional ballots that were cast on Election Day on Tuesday. Heading into that meeting, Republican mayoral candidate Mike Pantelides held on to a 50-vote lead over incumbent Democrat Josh Cohen.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
For months, Annapolis officials and residents have debated the future of downtown's City Dock area. Monday, the city council is scheduled to vote on a new master plan for the area, guiding future developments and city projects. The City Dock Master Plan drew strong criticism when it came before the council this summer, with many people testifying during an eight-hour public hearing that it would diminish the dock's maritime character, allow for buildings that are too tall and promote green spaces at the expense of needed parking.
NEWS
October 25, 2013
[Adrian] Rousseau and [Thomas] Matthews not showing up to Monday night's debate at City Hall tells me they do not have what it takes to run a city. I have to give [John Mathew] Smith a mark for showing up, however he does not seem to have the knowledge or network of people that the current council knows and have.  The current council members all have backgrounds as directors or been involved in government work. This tells me they understand what it takes to run a city and spend our money wisely. They discuss the effects of changes needed and do their research before committing to a project. The current council has ties to state government representatives and knows whom to petition for grants and funds that will benefit our town. This council has brought our city forward with new improvements, and balanced the budget. We have not had a tax hike in six years.
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