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NEWS
October 29, 2011
I recently attempted to call Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's office to encourage her to allow the Occupy Baltimore movement to stay overnight in McKeldin Plaza, as members of the group have been doing for weeks. I made the call after regular office hours because I work during the day, but it shouldn't have been a problem to leave a message, right? Wrong. Apparently, the mayor of this city of more than half a million people doesn't have voice mail. After 20 rings, I hung up. From this experience I must conclude that the mayor is only interested in my opinion between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. That's something to consider on Nov. 7. Gregory Sinder, Baltimore
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young called Monday for a hearing on whether the city should charge passengers a fee to ride the Charm City Circulator, the popular bus service that now connects more than 4 million Baltimoreans and visitors to work, school and entertainment in the city for free. Young wants to review the $7 million annual cost of running the service and determine whether the city can afford it. But his suggestion of charging $1 a trip drew criticism from riders and others.
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NEWS
February 2, 2014
Baltimore's mayor hides a report highly critical of the city's red-light and speed camera program, claiming that the vendor, whom she hired yet again, was somehow incompetent ( "Mayor says audit firm was 'not sufficiently qualified,'" Jan. 29). Now the city police commissioner is criticizing the media for reporting the basic facts about homicides in the city! This is all too rich. City Hall has become a treasure trove of comedy. Stephan G. Fugate - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
City officials are expected to approve a lease agreement Wednesday with a nonprofit to renovate and reopen the former Peale Museum with a cafe, library and learning center dedicated to the city's history and architecture. The Board of Estimates will vote whether to grant a three-year lease of the building to the Peale Center for Baltimore History and Architecture for $1. The old museum, near City Hall on North Holliday Street, has been vacant since 1997. The nonprofit is working to raise $4 million for the project.
NEWS
June 28, 2012
It appears that Baltimore has a requirements contract with Digicon Corp. which allows it to make computer equipment purchases ("City Hall's phone wars," June 26). This contract does not appear to cover services. Although phones might be considered computer hardware in an extended sense, I would argue that any such phones were purchased to provide a service, i.e., communication. Accordingly, Comptroller Joan Pratt is right in this instance and the administration has effectively undermined competition.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2011
The body of William Donald Schaefer lay in state Tuesday in the marble rotunda of City Hall, and a line curled around the historic building as people waited to pay their respects. Standing in the bright April sun, the mourners — old and young, rich and poor, black and white — clutched photos of Schaefer and described how he shaped their lives and their city. Here are some of their stories: Deborah Bailey-Kpazahi It's been more than three decades, but Deborah Bailey-Kpazahi still hums the jingle when she sees a street corner trash basket: "Trash Ball, it's a neat game everybody can win. Let me show you how to play.
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | December 18, 2013
Two weeks ago I noted that Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's advocacy on behalf of the farm bill working its way through Congress proved that she was just more of the same of the failed leadership that Baltimore has been subjected to over the years.  The latest stunt, as reported by WBAL-TV , re-emphasizes that point: "Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is looking for city residents to give input on how they think the city can...
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
A frequent critic of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration was arrested Wednesday when she tried to enter Baltimore's City Hall. Kim A. Trueheart, 55, of Baltimore, was arrested Wednesday morning as she tried to attend the city's 9 a.m. Board of Estimates meeting. Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said he had few details about the arrest, but said Trueheart was being "disorderly. " "City Hall is a public building, but we have an obligation to make sure that citizens that come to conduct business don't pose any type of threat and they're also respectful," Guglielmi said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2013
Baltimore's recreation chief Bill Tyler is leaving city government to work in Montgomery County, city officials said Friday. Tyler, who earned $94,000 annually, was in charge of implementing Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to consolidate recreation centers — closing and privatizing some — in an effort to cut costs while better focusing on the recreation centers that would remain open. Tyler's last day in Baltimore is Feb. 15. He will be the Southern Parks Division Chief of Montgomery Parks, officials said.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2012
Someone pass the popcorn, there's a new legal drama unfolding at City Hall — Law & Order: Special Municipal Unit. You might have seen the news that Joan Pratt, comptroller, is suing Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, mayor, or at least, her technology office. Not to be outdone — because he never is when it comes to governmental hijinks — Baltimore City Circuit Court Clerk Frank Conaway has filed notice that he will sue the city over bad charges on water bills. And who knows, by the time you read this, maybe the trend will have spread to Annapolis, where Mayor Joshua Cohen recently busted a man allegedly relieving himself from the third floor of a parking garage.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
Annapolis Mayor Mike Pantelides is filling two of the key vacant posts at City Hall: city manager and city attorney. Pantelides has nominated Thomas C. Andrews as city manager and Michael G. Leahy as city attorney. The Annapolis city council must confirm the appointments, which will officially be introduced at the council's meeting Monday. The mayor briefed the aldermen on the nominations during a closed-door meeting Thursday. If confirmed, Andrews and Leahy would bolster a City Hall staff that's been hit by firings and resignations since Pantelides took office in December.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Fed up with rodents and flooding, about half of the members of Baltimore's law department are leaving their ground-level offices at City Hall for a renovated facility in downtown Baltimore. The $306,000 cost of the renovations was approved Wednesday by the city's Board of Estimates. About 50 law department employees will move from City Hall to two floors on city-owned property at 7 E. Redwood St. "It became an environmental challenge," said City Solicitor George Nilson of the ground-level offices.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
About 50 Baltimore demonstrators gathered outside City Hall to stand in solidarity with Missouri protesters demonstrating against the police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown. Organizers of the demonstration meet regularly at an event called "West Wednesdays" in honor of Tyrone West, a man who died while being detained by police at a traffic stop last year. They broadened their cause Wednesday and increased turnout, using the events in Ferguson to call attention to what they said was police brutality in Baltimore.
NEWS
August 19, 2014
May I remind Dan Rodricks that we already have a bridge crossing the gateway to Baltimore's Inner Harbor named the "Key Bridge. " An awful sight it is, and we don't need another ( "Baltimore's future 'Monday Night Football shot,'" Aug. 15). If the officials at City Hall had a priority list of 25 most-needed projects, this sight-seeing bridge should be listed as No. 25. Bernard Helinski, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Elmer A. "Peck" Jones, the longtime Baltimore City Council clerk who had been a Democratic stalwart throughout his life, died Sunday of complications from kidney failure at Baltimore Washington Medical Center in Glen Burnie. He was 101. "I knew Mr. Jones when I was in the City Council, and he was such a gentleman. He was the salt of the earth and cared deeply for his city," said Gov. Martin J. O'Malley, who added, "He was never out sick, and I always thought of him as the Cal Ripken of City Hall.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
A federal appeals court on Wednesday upheld Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's overhaul of Baltimore's police and fire pension system, but left open avenues for the unions to keep fighting. "I'm certainly pleased with the court's ruling," Rawlings-Blake said of the decision. City officials say it cut about $400 million in pension costs by reducing benefits, raising the retirement age and requiring higher contributions from workers. "It was not something any of us wanted to do," the mayor said.
NEWS
August 18, 2012
The op-ed recommending that the Baltimore Development Corporation broaden its focus to include less grandiose redevelopment projects resonated with me as a former long-time board member of the Harlem Park Revitalization Corporation ("A new focus for the BDC," Aug. 16). It was our sense that our grass-roots, house by house, down and dirty non-profit housing rehabilitation work went unappreciated by Baltimore City's housing authority and unknown to entities like BDC. The housing authority's low regard for our efforts was evidenced by the cumbersome and seemingly punitive management of the Block Grant reimbursement process, which is the lifeblood of community development corporations.
NEWS
March 11, 2010
Baltimore First Deputy Mayor Andrew B. Frank leaves City Hall this spring after three years of handling economic development, one of the most crucial issues in a city with chronic high unemployment, widespread poverty and sky-high property tax rates. He has served as a crucial bridge between the city's business community and its government and has made important contributions, such as his effort to help push through an affordable-housing law. But he almost certainly won't be around long enough to see through the most important item in his portfolio: slots.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Baltimore finance director Harry Black is resigning to become the city manager of Cincinnati - the latest of at least six high-level departures from City Hall in a year. A Park Heights native, Black had been the city's finance director for about 21/2 years. He will be replaced by Finance Department deputy Henry Raymond, according to the mayor's office. Black's last day in Baltimore will be Aug. 20. His new job is pending approval of the Cincinnati City Council. “I would like to thank Mr. Black for his dedicated service to my administration and the City of Baltimore,” Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
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