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NEWS
March 27, 2012
Our politicians in Aberdeen are back at the wheel, trying to steer residents down a path in which they have no interest. The mayor and City Council had a "retreat" at Ripken Stadium a few weekends ago, where they started to work on their plans to solve the problems here in Aberdeen. Some of the ideas have merit but are approached from the wrong angle. Mayor Michael E. Bennett proposes securing investments for a pub or bar in "downtown Aberdeen" - we can describe this as the area on West Bel Air Avenue between the train tracks - and he explains that we need to eliminate height restrictions for this to happen.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The spokesman for the Baltimore City Fire Department said Friday he is leaving city government to move to D.C. because his wife has accepted a new job.  "It is a bittersweet moment for us," said Ian Brennan, who was previously a press secretary for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. "I am proud of my wife for taking this step forward in her career, but it is sad to leave the city we love -- the city where our children were born. " In addition to working for Rawlings-Blake, Brennan also served as a spokesman for Mayor Sheila Dixon.
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NEWS
May 28, 2013
As a Baltimore resident and daily subscriber to The Sun, which carries frequent stories that place in question the transparency, credibility and competence of city government, one cannot help but wonder if all or any of the water rate rises since 2000 and planned for the future have or will be necessary and beneficial to city residents who pay the bills ("Water bill whirlpool," May 22). Most recently, there have been reports on the city's misuse of federal educational grant funds ("Audit faults schools over federal funds," May 23)
NEWS
September 18, 2014
Baltimore City certainly did show off its best with this week's Star-Spangled Spectacular to residents and tourists ( "A spectacular weekend for Baltimore," Sept. 15). We were thrilled to see so many people lining the Inner Harbor promenade to enjoy tours of the visiting ships, watch the fireworks and dine at our local restaurants. And now the city prepares for Baltimore Book Festival, which moves to the Inner Harbor for the first time ever. Looks like the Orioles aren't the only ones on a winning streak, despite some recent setbacks.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2012
Buried at the bottom of today's CityPaper article about the Black Guerrilla Family gang is an eye-opening interview with an anonymous member, spelling out the gang's goal of infiltrating city government by masquerading as an anti-drug, black empowerment movement.  For anyone following the case, the statements aren't surprising - federal agents had said as much in the original court papers, and The Sun in 2009 obtained a copy of the gang's...
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The spokesman for the Baltimore City Fire Department said Friday he is leaving city government to move to D.C. because his wife has accepted a new job.  "It is a bittersweet moment for us," said Ian Brennan, who was previously a press secretary for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. "I am proud of my wife for taking this step forward in her career, but it is sad to leave the city we love -- the city where our children were born. " In addition to working for Rawlings-Blake, Brennan also served as a spokesman for Mayor Sheila Dixon.
NEWS
By William R. Brown Jr | June 9, 1998
WHENEVER reports emerge about new ways for Baltimore government to work more efficiently, we at City Hall take them seriously. That's why the recently released Calvert Institute for Policy Research report "Padded Payroll" caught our attention.Authors of the report claimed that their data proved Baltimore's government has far more workers than cities of comparable size. But a review of the report by the city's Program Assessment Unit (a group of analysts who are charged with making recommendations to improve the efficiency of city government)
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2001
Anyone who tries calling the less-than-efficient phone system of Baltimore city government offices likely experiences one of two nagging problems. Or both. First, you may have to dial three or four numbers -- or find yourself transferred three or four times -- before reaching the person or department you sought. Next, when you find the right office, you may get someone's voice mail, only to be told the system is full and you can't leave a message. So, despite the proposed budget cuts Mayor Martin O'Malley unveiled last week, city officials have decided it's time for a new way to handle the 10,000-plus phone calls that pour into city offices each day. And in the coming months, the city will install two systems to resolve its phone woes.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
A former city school board member and city government worker who is accused of lying about his resume will be tried in court on fraud charges this fall. Anthony A. Hamilton, 35, who resigned from the school board as well as from the city's Health Department last August, used another man's Social Security number and student identification number to pretend to have degrees he didn't earn, prosecutors said in charging documents. Hamilton, who faces six fraud-related charges, was arraigned on Monday and has a trial scheduled for Oct. 27. His attorney could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 11, 2010
Sarah E. "Sally" Murphy, the first woman to serve as grand marshal of Baltimore's St. Patrick's Day parade and a retired city government worker, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at ManorCare in Ruxton. The Rodgers Forge resident was 77. "She was one of the greatest workers at City Hall," said former Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro III. "She practically ran her department and was its main cog. " Miss Murphy was born in Baltimore and raised on Cecil Avenue. She was the daughter of Jerome Murphy, a Hynson, Wescott and Dunning pharmacist.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
Annapolis Mayor Mike Pantelides is filling two of the key vacant posts at City Hall: city manager and city attorney. Pantelides has nominated Thomas C. Andrews as city manager and Michael G. Leahy as city attorney. The Annapolis city council must confirm the appointments, which will officially be introduced at the council's meeting Monday. The mayor briefed the aldermen on the nominations during a closed-door meeting Thursday. If confirmed, Andrews and Leahy would bolster a City Hall staff that's been hit by firings and resignations since Pantelides took office in December.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
If historic tax bills are wrong in the future, at least city property owners will know who to blame. The City Council voted unanimously Monday to give Baltimore's government authority to do the appraisals that determine the size of historic tax credits - essentially stripping state officials of the duty in response to errors that left some property owners with wildly inaccurate bills. The plan, which is expected to get final approval next week, ends months of finger-pointing between state and city officials over who is to blame for the problems.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
A man was injured in a shooting in the parking lot of Pip Moyer Community Recreation Center in Annapolis Monday night, police said. The victim was taken to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore after the shooting, which occurred at about 6:30 p.m., Annapolis police said. The man's injuries were not believed to be life threatening, police said. The recreation center is owned by the Annapolis city government. Mayor Mike Pantelides is in "close contact" with Annapolis Police Chief Michael Pristoop, but declined to comment on the shooting, said city spokeswoman Rhonda Wardlaw.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Annapolis Mayor Mike Pantelides says he's making progress on filling a number of key vacancies in city government positions and will have nominees for a new city manager and city attorney by Sept. 22. Because of a series of firings and resignations since Pantelides took office in December, the city government is without a permanent city manager, city attorney, planning director, transportation director, and recreation and parks director. The new city manager will have a hand in hiring new directors for recreation and parks and planning and zoning, Pantelides told members of the city council Monday night.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
A former city school board member and city government worker who is accused of lying about his resume will be tried in court on fraud charges this fall. Anthony A. Hamilton, 35, who resigned from the school board as well as from the city's Health Department last August, used another man's Social Security number and student identification number to pretend to have degrees he didn't earn, prosecutors said in charging documents. Hamilton, who faces six fraud-related charges, was arraigned on Monday and has a trial scheduled for Oct. 27. His attorney could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | August 3, 2014
If you are black and have done business with the city or the state - or have even thought of it - you probably know the name Arnold Jolivet. If you are a politician who has anything at all to do with granting government contracts, you definitely know that name. People like me, on the other hand, who go about our lives without giving a thought about procurement processes, probably know nothing of the man that a city official, a construction contractor and a staunch critic of city government admiringly described to me as a warrior.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
On Wednesday, Baltimore will relaunch its publicly owned TV station, shifting its focus from broadcasts of government meetings to CharmTV, a showcase for city restaurants, businesses and neighborhoods. City leaders see an opportunity to counteract negative perceptions of Baltimore, but with the change come questions about significantly increased spending on an untested business model - without benefit of data to show how many people watch the station. An extensive publicity campaign from the Mayor's Office of Cable and Communications promises a fresh slate of four locally produced prime-time programs equal in quality to those seen on the Food Network or HGTV, showcasing "all that is proud, inspiring and authentic" about Baltimore food, nightlife, neighborhoods and history.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
Among financial problems facing the Baltimore-based People's Community Health Centers — which plans to close its five clinics that assist low-income people — is a lawsuit filed by the city. Officials say the nonprofit owes $18,607.04 in back rent for an office in a city-owned building at 5225 York Road in the Govans area, according to the suit filed in Baltimore District Court on May 14. People's signed a lease last summer agreeing to pay $2,325.88 per month for the 2,045-square-foot space on the first floor, the lawsuit states.
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