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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
The Baltimore Fire Department has implemented a strict new social media policy outlining what firefighters can post on Twitter, Facebook and personal blogs — drawing criticism that the department is trampling on First Amendment rights. Under the policy, department personnel can be reprimanded for anything they write online about their jobs that doesn't adhere to conduct rules, which require "good judgment" and "courtesy and respect to the public and to fellow employees. " The policy also restricts them from sharing information about fire scenes.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
A two-alarm fire in Baltimore City on Wednesday morning has sent a police officer to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center due to possible smoke inhalation, city fire department officials said. Capt. Roman Clark said that the blaze occurred at an apartment-style building with six units that were all vacant due to renovations. Officials said that the incident occurred at the 3400 block of Woodbrook Avenue near Mondawmin Mall. Clark added that a firefighter suffered minor injuries during the incident and was transported to a local hospital.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 27, 1997
Two Baltimore-area health organizations have donated eight portable heart-monitoring units to the city Fire Department that will enable paramedics to relay data on a patient's heart function directly to a hospital's emergency room, fire officials said.Helix Health and Sinai Hospital donated the units, which fire officials said will greatly improve survival chances after heart attacks, the nation's leading cause of death.The monitoring units will enable paramedics to better assess a patient's condition and ensure that proper resources are at hand when the patient arrives at a hospital.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Two fires were reported within blocks of each other early Tuesday morning in the Hamilton Hills neighborhood. At around 4:34 a.m., a single-alarm fire broke out at a vacant dwelling in the 2800 block of Hamilton Avenue, Baltimore City fire officials said. Four firefighters were treated for minor injuries in connection with the incident. Approximately 20 minutes later, two blocks away in the 2600 block of Evergreen Avenue, another single-alarm fire was reported at a vacant residence.
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 25, 1997
AT THE AGE OF 80-plus years, Harrison Shipley has co-written his first book -- "Remem- brances of Passing Days: A Pictorial History of Ellicott City and Its Fire Department."He's the logical person to write this book.Shipley's father, B. H. Shipley Sr. and his wife, Mary, lived in an apartment above the fire station, which at that time served all of Howard County.Dad was the fire chief. Harrison Shipley was born and raised in that apartment on Main Street.When the telephone was installed in the 1920s, there was no 911. The phone was rigged to ring directly to the apartment in the event of a fire.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | February 10, 2006
At the Baltimore City Fire Department, they call it "the anomaly." In 2004, the department hired an all-white class of recruits for its training academy, sparking outrage and demands for change in an outdated hiring model. Two years, two tests and two recruitment drives later, fire officials have turned around a public relations disaster. Today, the department's academy will graduate two classes in which minorities make up 61.9 percent and 47.4 percent. Since 2004, 60.4 percent of the students passing through the academy have been minorities.
NEWS
By Reginald Fields and Reginald Fields,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2004
For the first time since it integrated 50 years ago, the Baltimore City Fire Department has hired an all-white class of recruits for its training academy. A group of retired black city firefighters, many of whom became pioneers when they integrated the Fire Department in the 1950s and 1960s, are accusing Chief William J. Goodwin Jr. of stamping on racial progress and violating the tenets of the Civil Rights Act. "The chief has set this department back 50 years with this group," said retired firefighter Alfred Boyd, referring to the 30 men and women in this year's recruiting class.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 21, 2008
Leonard John Haywood Jr., a World War II submariner and a retired deputy city Fire Department chief, died Sunday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 81. Mr. Haywood, who was born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown, graduated from Patterson Park High School. "He tried to enlist in the Navy when he was 16, but they wouldn't take him because he was underage and needed his mother's permission," said a daughter, Carolynne H. Dorsey of Cockeysville. On his 17th birthday, he enlisted in the Navy because he wanted to "serve his country," said his son, Kirk Haywood, a retired city Fire Department captain.
NEWS
June 12, 1992
A one-alarm fire Wednesday night caused property damage estimated at $40,000 to the Mount Washington Food Market in the 1600 block of Kelly Ave.Capt. Calvin Johnson, city Fire Department spokesman, said the fire started in an electrical outlet behind an ice cream cooler on the first floor of the two-story brick building.The fire was confined to the first floor.No one was injured in the fire, which was reported at 10:22 p.m.
NEWS
April 10, 1991
Western High School, 4600 Falls Road, was closed today after a deliberately set fire sent heavy smoke through the building.Capt. Patrick P. Flynn, spokesman for the city Fire Department, said the fire, ruled an arson, broke out in the basement janitorial supply room about 5:20 a.m.Wooden shelves and janitorial supplies, including cardboard boxes, were burned. Flynn said fire damage, which was confined to the supply room, was estimated at $15,000. The fire was declared under control about 6 a.m.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
A transformer explosion resulted in a single-alarm fire early Tuesday morning at the Good Samaritan Hospital campus. The fire, which was reported at 8:05 a.m., was quickly contained and did not spread to the main hospital, said Ian Brennan, a spokesman for the Baltimore City Fire Department. No injuries were reported. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company crews are on scene working to repair the transformer, Brennan said. The hospital, located in the 5600 block of Loch Raven Boulevard, is using a back-up power generator in the meantime.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
She hails from a family of Baltimore firefighters, but Summer Britcher's life runs counter. She battles the ice. One of the youngest members of the Olympic luge team, Britcher, 19, is competing in her first Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. Opening ceremonies are Friday and come Monday she'll lay on her back and rattle her sled down a frozen track with 17 banked turns for nearly one mile at speeds exceeding 80 miles an hour. Sans brakes. "It's terrifying, but I'm hooked," Britcher said.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
Firefighters battling a blaze in a small rowhome in West Baltimore on Thursday evening discovered the body of a man in a second-floor bedroom, said Roman Clark, spokesman for the city Fire Department. The man has not yet been identified, and a neighbor said she had never seen anyone go in or out of the home at 615 Claymont Avenue. The homes flanking it were vacant and no other injuries were reported, Clark said. It has not yet been determined whether the man was a resident, and the cause of the fire is under investigation.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
The Baltimore Fire Department has implemented a strict new social media policy outlining what firefighters can post on Twitter, Facebook and personal blogs — drawing criticism that the department is trampling on First Amendment rights. Under the policy, department personnel can be reprimanded for anything they write online about their jobs that doesn't adhere to conduct rules, which require "good judgment" and "courtesy and respect to the public and to fellow employees. " The policy also restricts them from sharing information about fire scenes.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2012
Dispatched to a one-story brick warehouse in flames on Baylis Street in Canton last month, firefighters did not know it contained 8,000 gallons of corrosive chemicals. But not because it wasn't known to the Baltimore City Fire Department. Its hazardous materials permit database included the warehouse and chemicals, but is so arcane that it's impossible to point and click through it using a computer mouse. The chemicals also were disclosed by the owner on an annual hazmat form required under a federal law inspired when a chemical gas leak killed 5,000 people in India in 1984.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2012
Monsignor Richard E. Parks, pastor of Sacred Heart of Mary Roman Catholic Church in Graceland Park for 25 years who was also a city Fire Department chaplain, died of cancer Feb. 19 at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 80. Monsignor Parks was remembered by friends for his caring personality and the lasting friendships he established wherever he went. "He never thought of himself," said the Rev. George Gannon, current pastor of Sacred Heart of Mary. "He was generous with his time and had an ability to ascertain just what people needed.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish | November 4, 2007
Nine apartments were damaged in a two-alarm fire at the Windsor Forest apartment complex in West Baltimore yesterday morning, according to Capt. Roman Clark, a spokesman for the city Fire Department. The blaze, on the second and third floors of a garden apartment building in the 5000 block of Corley Road, was reported about 3 a.m., Clark said. The American Red Cross of Central Maryland is putting up the nine people the fire displaced in local hotels, organization spokeswoman Linnea Anderson said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 29, 2004
Nearly two dozen cats and dogs were taken uninjured yesterday from a rowhouse in Baltimore's Barclay neighborhood where firefighters extinguished a fire in a bedroom, authorities reported. Reported at 3:32 p.m. in the 2400 block of Guilford Ave., the fire was confined to a second-floor bedroom and was under control in minutes. A male resident was treated at the scene by medics for a minor cut to a hand, said city Fire Department spokesman Kevin Cartwright. Eighteen cats and four dogs found in the house were taken by animal control officers to the city animal shelter on Stockholm Street.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 18, 2011
Paul L. "Sarge" Hartsock Sr., a retired Baltimore Fire Department communications lineman and a Korean War veteran, died March 8 of heart failure at Manor Care Ruxton. The Dundalk resident was 81. The son of a steelworker and a homemaker, Mr. Hartsock was born at home on East Hoffman Street, 45 minutes after midnight on Jan. 1, 1930. The family later moved to North Washington Street. Mr. Hartsock attended city public schools and left to enlist in the Navy when he was 16. "When they found out, they let him go. He later enlisted in the Marine Corps," said a son, Paul L. Hartsock Jr. of Edgemere.
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