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October 26, 2011
As city administrator, my position serves "at the pleasure of" the mayor who appointed me, Craig A. Moe. I understand my position may end next month; and I accept that. However, one of my most important duties and responsibilities is to protect the city's exceptional employees. City employees provide the services that make our city a great place to live, work and do business. I believe I must speak out for our valuable employees to share the feelings they have expressed to me and their co-workers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
Want to see what gifts Baltimore's elected officials and government workers have received? You can check out the details online, but you first have to make a stop at City Hall to sign up. The city's Ethics Board says it is not allowed to make the process totally digital because of a requirement, based on a state law, that individuals show up once in person, show identification and fill out a contact form. The city is among the first local governments to provide online access to the records, which also include disclosure of certain loans, family income sources and business relationships.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert | June 14, 2012
As Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake pursues her goal of attracting 10,000 families to Baltimore over a decade, she might consider launching a recruiting drive down at City Hall. More than 40 percent of municipal workers reside outside the city they serve, and 5 percent don't even live in Maryland, according to statistics posted on a city website. Baltimore County is home to about a quarter of the workforce of 14,559 city workers. The figures reflect residency as of Dec. 1, according to the city's OpenBaltimore website.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
Video of the high speed crash that killed a bystander outside Baltimore City Hall last year shows the suspect being pulled out of his overturned car and restrained by people on scene. The footage, shot from a Maryland State Trooper's patrol car that was trailing the speeding Acura sedan, was released this week by State Police. The crash occurred on April 9, 2013, and killed city finance employee Matthew Hersl, a popular Little Italy neighborhood activist and Baltimore Orioles fan who was standing outside when the vehicle careened off of Interstate 83. Johnny Johnson, 44, the Acura's driver, pleaded guilty to vehicular homicide and possession of a controlled dangerous substance on Dec. 12. The West Baltimore man was sentenced to 11 years.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Julie Scharper and Baltimore Sun reporters | February 12, 2010
Union officials say the city is considering docking the pay of police officers, firefighters and public works employees who did not report to work during the week's historic snowstorms, a move labor leaders say would be unprecedented in recent memory. Although many city employees were on liberal leave this week, "essential personnel," including public safety officers, were required to show up for their shifts or face losing a day of pay. The policy has been on the books for at least six years but has been enforced infrequently.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
Last month we reported that more than 40 percent of Baltimore City government employees live outside the city , according to the city's Open Baltimore website, which used data from December. Those records have been updated, and they show an even larger share of municipal workers now reside outside city limits. As of June 30, 47 percent of employees live elsewhere, up from 44 percent in December. The municipal government has 14,457 employees, of whom 7,726 are reported to be city residents.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
A dozen city Department of Transportation employees may be fired after they were accused of stealing nearly $60,000 in scrap metal, city officials said Friday. An investigation by the city's inspector general estimated the employees were earning about $191,000 annually from the sale of heavy-gauge cable stolen from Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and the city's conduit system. The agency found evidence for only part of that sum, however, and did not know how long the alleged scheme might have continued.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
When Baltimore crossing guard supervisors make their rounds, they're apt to be driving cars emblazoned not with the familiar city seal but with a "Z" - for Zipcar, the vehicle-sharing service that allows members to rent cars by the hour for short trips. The supervisors are among two dozen Transportation Department employees who use the nationwide service that launched in Baltimore in 2010. To date, the agency says it has spent $63,000 on Zipcar use. "This gives us an alternative way to get people where they need to be for work purposes," said Billy Hwang, the city's deputy transportation director.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
  Baltimore City posted new pay data for city workers on its Open Baltimore website Wednesday, and the numbers once again illustrate how overtime can help lift incomes far above annual salary levels. The figures show that 328 municipal employees - 172 at the Police Department - received gross pay at least 50 percent above their salary. The data covers fiscal 2012, which ended June 30. Police Lt. Stephen C. Nalewajko Jr. made more money than MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blake, earning $166,200 compared to the mayor's gross pay of $161,800.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | September 17, 1991
HealthPlus Inc., an expansion-minded health maintenance organization based in Greenbelt, announced yesterday that it has signed a contract to become one of several HMO plans available to city employees.The agreement means HealthPlus, which presently serves 170,000 members in Maryland, Washington and Northern Virginia, will be exposed to 27,000 potential new customers in Baltimore. The HMO already has a contract with the Baltimore Teachers Union, which has 7,800 members."I think that we are viewing Baltimore as a very potentially strong market for us," HealthPlus Chief Operating Officer Virginia Dollard said.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will unveil a proposed $2.5 billion budget Wednesday that would give city workers a 2 percent raise and - for the first time since 2008 - would not cut city services, officials said. The plan includes the latest installment in the mayor's 10-year plan to reduce property taxes by 22 percent. Officials said the city's stabilizing financial picture also allows $26 million in new capital investments, including $5 million in technology to allow police officers to file reports from crime scenes and their supervisors to better manage overtime costs.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
A Baltimore City employee resigned after being overpaid by $176,200, nearly double her salary. Sarah Morris-Compton, who was hired in September 2011 to lead the Health Department's Office of Policy and Planning, will repay the city, said Kevin R. Harris, a spokesman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. An agreement between Morris-Compton and the city shows she will repay $176,200 in overpaid wages, although the city's online salary database shows she was overpaid $130,600. The reason for the discrepancy is unclear.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
A Baltimore transportation official asked the agency's director if he'd been able to "tap into" email records of an employee suspected of leaking information to The Baltimore Sun about the city's troubled speed camera program, according to records obtained under the Public Information Act. The question came in a Dec. 18 email from James Harkness, the head of the division that oversees the mothballed speed and red-light camera program. "Were you able to tap into email records of the individual I suspect of being the 'source' in Luke's article?"
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Annapolis voters will choose Tuesday who will lead the capital city for the next four years: incumbent Democratic Mayor Josh Cohen or Republican newcomer Mike Pantelides. Cohen says he'd continue to correct the city's financial woes, carry out a new vision for City Dock, and improve parking and transportation. Pantelides says he'd bring a business perspective to government, holding city employees responsible for providing good service and putting an end to tax and fee increases.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
The City of Annapolis struck agreements with four employee unions on Monday, giving employees raises and changing their health benefits in retirement. Mayor Josh Cohen, who will stand re-election next week, said the four-year agreements are a "real feather in Annapolis' cap" and came after 14 months of negotiations with the unions. City Manager Michael Malinoff said the contracts are "an affordable solution" for the city to shore up its pension and retiree health care programs, which currently are underfunded and have put the city's bond ratings at risk.
BUSINESS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Baltimore City officials are investigating a complaint filed Wednesday by two minority- and women-owned businesses against health care giant Aetna for not using their services despite a contractual agreement to do so. Thomas B. Corey, chief of Baltimore's Minority & Women's Business Opportunity Office, said he will research why Aetna did not use the subcontractors, CASI Inc. and JUL Enterprise, despite committing to when it applied for the city...
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | February 25, 1992
All new city government employees would have to live in Baltimore under terms of a charter amendment introduced into the Baltimore City Council last night.The measure, introduced by Councilman Wilbur E. Cunningham, would affect city employees hired after Jan. 1, 1993.The council resolution comes a month after Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke suggested that all government workers be required to live in the city.But, while Mr. Schmoke could simply issue an executive order to impose the requirement, the charter amendment could not take effect without public hearings and approval by the voters.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2001
Sheila Jordan, president of a city employees' labor union, died of cancer Saturday at her Catonsville home -- one day after she was elected to a third term in the job. Mrs. Jordan, 49, was unopposed in the City Union of Baltimore election. She had been president of the union representing about 5,000 municipal workers since 1997. "I had a great deal of respect for her," Mayor Martin O'Malley said yesterday. "She was a strong advocate for her members and was always decent. She made her points in a pleasant, forthright, straight-up sort of way. She never resorted to personal attacks.
NEWS
August 6, 2013
Auditing employee health insurance rolls to make sure everyone receiving benefits as a dependent is entitled to them is exactly the kind of thing Baltimore needs to do if it is to have any chance of controlling the cost of government, cutting taxes and making city living more attractive. The fact that the effort has caught some employees so completely off guard - some reportedly had no idea this was going on until they sought to fill prescriptions for children or spouses and found themselves without coverage - shows just how lax management has been up to this point and how far the city has to go before it is running a truly efficient operation.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
Baltimore officials have dropped more than 1,600 spouses, children and others from city health care coverage after workers failed to fill out forms to prove they were eligible dependents. The city purged the health care rolls after questions were raised about the eligibility of some dependents. The move will save Baltimore about $6.5 million a year, officials said. But critics say some city workers were unfairly denied health insurance for their families and now can't afford to pay for doctor visits.
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