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NEWS
November 9, 2011
Ho hum is the only thing I came up with when I received my elections reminder card last weekend about yesterday's elections. I have never seen such a pitiful list of "contenders" for major political offices. I am normally "charged up" with at least one candidate on the list when I review the ballot box choices, but not this year. I know it has been challenging journey for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to fill the shoes of Sheila Dixon - to have to continue someone's else's legacy, and create a "brand" of one's own simultaneously.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
A veteran defense attorney running an independent campaign for Baltimore state's attorney argued in Circuit Court Friday that city election workers "messed up" when they ruled he did not have enough signatures to appear on the November ballot.  "Just because they say it's so, don't make it so," said Edward Smith Jr., the attorney for candidate Russell A. Neverdon Sr. "Each and every [signature] they looked at, they messed up. " Judge Martin P. Welch said he will postpone ruling on the case until after he hears more evidence next Friday.  The city's Board of Elections said earlier this monrth that Neverdon fell more than 1,000 signatures short of the 4,160 needed to challenge Democrat Marilyn J. Mosby on the general election ballot.
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NEWS
September 25, 1990
If city election officials cannot get their act together in November's general election, heads should roll. After the election board's disgraceful performance in the Sept. 13 primary, there had better be plenty of changes -- fast.What happened on the night of Sept 13, and the following two days, cannot be tolerated. It was a case of horrendous planning, inadequate training and poor execution. There was no valid excuse for shutting down vote-counting operations at 2 a.m., with a number of races hanging in the balance.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | November 6, 2013
Though they faced a challenge, the five incumbents running as a ticket under the name Team Laurel were all re-elected to serve two-year terms on the Laurel City Council, based on the election night unofficial count Tuesday. Incumbents Michael Leszcz, who was running for re-election to the at-large seat; Valerie Nicholas and H. Edward Ricks, both of Ward 1; and Donna Crary and Frederick Smalls of Ward 2 were re-elected by a comfortable margin, likely rendering totals from absentee and provisional ballots inconsequential.
NEWS
April 23, 1995
Keenly contested elections for high offices stir strong emotions. In fact, it often suits the strategy of rival candidates to portray their campaigns as life-and-death cliffhangers so that partisans can be mobilized, money raised and voters turned out.As Baltimore's major daily newspaper, The Sun becomes the object of much guessing and second- guessing by the politically active at election times. News stories are subjected to endless dissecting for hidden biases; editorials are scrutinized for hints as to whom the paper might endorse in the election.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1999
Social activist and mayoral candidate A. Robert Kaufman said yesterday that he would push for restructuring the city election system, including requiring voter identification, eliminating primaries and allowing the City Council to elect its president.The founder of the City Wide Coalition, best known for his call for the city to begin an auto insurance program, also would like the city to hire a city manager and for council members to be elected at large."I would be real happy to be the city's last mayor," Kaufman said at a news conference.
NEWS
May 7, 2001
The Annapolis City Election Office is seeking judges for this year's municipal elections. About 150 people are needed. Eight judges will serve in each of the 16 precincts - two chief judges, two book judges, two machine judges and two voter-identification judges. People to serve as at-large and replacement judges are also needed. Residents who are registered voters are eligible. Party affiliation is critical to some positions, although those registered as Independent may serve. Pay for the 16-hour shifts ranges from $160 to $208 for each election date.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer | September 13, 1995
The Baltimore election board will begin opening more than 3,500 absentee ballots tomorrow at 10 a.m.More than 4,200 ballots were issued for the election. As of late yesterday, 3,564 had been returned to the election office. Of those, roughly 3,100 were cast by Democrats, according to city election officials.In addition, any ballot that arrives in today's mail and that was postmarked by Monday will be accepted.City election administrator Barbara E. Jackson said the counting of the absentee ballots should take less than a day.Baltimore election officials predicted that the absentee-ballot counting process should go much more quickly than it did in last year's disputed gubernatorial election.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers Joe Mathews and Michael James contributed to this article | September 13, 1995
The question was of the "Who's buried in Grant's tomb?" variety -- "Who signs where it says 'voter's signature?' "Unfortunately, the question phoned into city election administrator Barbara E. Jackson came from an election judge, who presumably would know better."
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | September 30, 2006
Baltimore election judges will get a boost in pay for the general election this year, a move backers say they hope will cut down on the widespread tardiness and absenteeism that added chaos to this month's primary. A bill increasing city election judge pay by $25 a day and $50 for chief judges - passed long before the primary problems - goes into effect tomorrow, along with dozens of other measures, including stiffer penalties for teenage drunken drivers. City election officials say recruiting enough qualified election judges in the city - especially enough Republicans - is a chronic problem exacerbated by the long hours workers must put in at the polls and the low pay. Now, city election judges will make $150 and chief election judges $200 for a workday that can stretch beyond 14 hours.
NEWS
October 31, 2013
The federal shutdown this fall was a tough lesson in how coming to agreement is important to getting things done. When the five City Council incumbents answered questions at the Laurel Board of Trade's public candidates forum last week, their answers were nearly always made in agreement with one another. And while it would have been nice to hear what they didn't agree on, they have found enough common ground to effectively govern the city as a council in the last two years. The council successfully attracted a developer to replace the nearly empty Laurel Mall; enhanced pedestrian safety through improving crosswalks such as the one for residents of Selbourn House; has worked with the business community and created incentives for new business to come to Main Street; and has proposed lowering property taxes as the city receives expected new revenue from developments that are in the works.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
I see that our mayor wants new employees to settle for a 401(k) pension plans ("Rawlings-Blake seeks to switch new employees from pensions to 401(k)-style plans," July 15). I understand why there should be exceptions for the police and fire departments. They put their lives on the line. But the new plan should apply to elected officials. If the plan isn't good enough for them, you can be sure it's not a good plan. I'm tired of elected officials, including the mayor, thinking that they are so special that they don't have to live within their means.
NEWS
RECORD STAFF REPORT | April 10, 2013
A little more than three weeks remain until the May 7 city election in Havre de Grace and though the campaign has been relatively quiet to date, things can be expected to heat up as Election Day draws near. This year's election features a race for mayor and for three city council seats. Mayor Wayne Dougherty is seeking a fourth term and is challenged by former city councilman Jim Miller. In the council races, incumbents John Correri and Randy Craig are seeking re-election. Challengers include former councilman Fred Cullum and two first-time candidates, Thomas Barnes and Robert Greene.
NEWS
July 5, 2012
Some Baltimore activists are fighting against a charter amendment that, if approved by voters in November, would align Baltimore's elections with the presidential election cycle - and in the process give the mayor and most of the city's other elected officials an extra year in office. The advocates are absolutely right that the proposal is not the ideal solution to the city's problems of unnecessary election expenses and low turnout. But given a recent state law change that controls the timing of Baltimore's primary election, voters should approve the charter amendment.
NEWS
April 4, 2012
One of the main reasons Baltimore MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakeprovided for her effort to move the city's primary elections from their current off-year schedule to the presidential election cycle was the idea that it would help boost turnout. The idea, which has been floating around Baltimore and the General Assembly for years, gained significant traction this year in the wake of record-low turnout in the 2011 mayoral primary. Only about 22 percent of eligible voters cast ballots then.
NEWS
April 3, 2012
Election officials predict a record low turnout for the Maryland presidential primary election ("Key races, little interest in primary," April 2). Meanwhile, the state legislature just passed a law that would move the election of Baltimore's mayor to coincide with presidential elections on the theory that the turnout would improve. What's wrong with this picture, and why do all other jurisdictions hold their leadership elections to coincide with election of the governor, not president?
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2001
A broad-based coalition of unions and community organizations formally began yesterday the process of trying to change the City Charter to trim the City Council by four members and create 14 single-member districts. The coalition, Communities and Labor United for Baltimore, filed a proposed petition with the city election board. The language of the petition, which requires 10,000 signatures to be placed on a ballot, must be reviewed and approved by election officials. Norma Washington, chairwoman of Maryland's Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN)
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | March 24, 2012
A bill to move Baltimore City's election to the presidential cycle cleared the House of Delegates Saturday, setting the stage for MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakeand the current city council to be in office for an additional year. The legislation would move the next city primary to 2016. The city will have to approve another measure to move the general to that year. Without the changes, the next city election would be in 2015. There is wide agreement that the city should move its election an issue that gained fresh urgency after record low turnout during the city elections last fall.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2012
A measure to move Baltimore's election to the presidential cycle was among scores of bills that cleared the House of Delegates during a rare Saturday session, setting the stage for MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakeand the current city council to be in office for an additional year. Other legislation receiving House approval included a lower charge for those caught with small amounts of marijuana and a bill that would require helmets for motor scooter drivers. Delegates also had a testy debate on a provision that would allow expedited court procedures for some developers.
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