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By Marie Marciano Gullard and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
When Stephen Huppaty, owner of OzCorp Fine Builders, moved to Baltimore from Australia in 1997, he was intrigued by an interesting appendage to the miles of brick row houses -- rooftop decks. In the following years, these playpens in the sky would continue popping up in neighborhoods like Fells Point, Federal Hill, Locust Point, Butchers Hill and Canton. To Huppaty, it made perfect sense. In the tight confines of these neighborhoods, owners wishing to put additions on their row homes could either go back (given sufficient room)
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By Marie Marciano Gullard and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
When Stephen Huppaty, owner of OzCorp Fine Builders, moved to Baltimore from Australia in 1997, he was intrigued by an interesting appendage to the miles of brick row houses -- rooftop decks. In the following years, these playpens in the sky would continue popping up in neighborhoods like Fells Point, Federal Hill, Locust Point, Butchers Hill and Canton. To Huppaty, it made perfect sense. In the tight confines of these neighborhoods, owners wishing to put additions on their row homes could either go back (given sufficient room)
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NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2003
The calendar tells us that these are the first days of fall. But for wild creatures making their home in the city, the autumn shuffle is already under way. They're moving along secret highways that parallel our own: the light-rail right of way, the JFX embankment, the banks of the city's streams, even the storm sewers. Some are just passing through on their way to winter homes. Others, the young adults of the animal world, are leaving the family home and looking for places of their own. And although we rarely notice them, they're making use of every spare corner of the city.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,daniel.rodricks@baltsun.com | August 2, 2009
Urban gardeners - green-thumbed Baltimoreans who grow their own fruits and vegetables on hundreds of 10-by-15-foot plots around the city - put down their hoes and gathered under a tent in War Memorial Plaza last evening to sample each other's bounty and toast a great growing season. The Annual City Farms and Community Gardens Supper, now in its 22d year, brought to an increasingly green plaza in front of City Hall dozens of men and women who've been toiling through spring and summer to produce tomatoes and peppers, kale and Swiss chard, cabbage and cucumbers in eight "farms" in city parks.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2003
When Glenn Moomau throws open his living room windows, Fells Point rushes in. The distinct aroma of fresh bread, the brassy clanging of kitchens, and one of Moomau's favorites, the shrill whistle of a tugboat -- all are daily reminders that just one floor below is the neighborhood's bustling heart. Moomau, a writer and musician, lives above a vintage store called Flashbacks and a popcorn shop, with a back-window view of the kitchen at Bertha's restaurant. To enter his apartment, he must walk through a narrow alley to the back of the building and climb steep stairs.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 18, 2000
HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam - Sitting beneath swirling ceiling fans in his Tam Tam Computer Cafe in the heart of the city once known as Saigon, Huynh Minh is the face of tomorrow's Vietnam. A self-described "boat person" who fled the country in 1989, Minh spent five years in a refugee camp in Hong Kong, where he learned English, studied the Internet and made business contacts. Rejected as a political refugee, he returned here in 1994 and two years later opened a cyber cafe. "I want to dream of a better life, but I know this is my destiny.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | October 12, 1994
Plans to grant final approval to the reconstruction of Main Street in downtown Annapolis were delayed yesterday when the Historic District Commission postponed consideration of the matter for at least two more weeks.The $5 million rebricking and redesign project is awaiting approval by the commission, which is considering how the plan will affect traffic patterns and pedestrian flow down the city's central artery. The commission put off discussion of the project to give city dwellers more time to voice their concerns about the new design.
NEWS
February 21, 2007
ISSUE: Frustrated with the noise outside her apartment complex, Annapolis Alderwoman Julie M. Stankivic is drafting a bill that would subject city cabdrivers to fines for honking their horns when they pick up passengers. Stankivic, who has filed eight complaints in five weeks against cabdrivers, said the city is being "besieged" by the disruption familiar to most city dwellers. She prefers that the drivers use their cell phones to alert fares of their arrival. But Alfred LaGasse, executive vice president of the Taxicab, Limousine & Paratransit Association, a national organization based in Kensington, said he couldn't think of "a city in any place in the whole wide world" that has attempted to ban honking, excessive or otherwise.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Staff Writer | February 17, 1993
Baltimore residents are again asking the state legislature to lower their car insurance rates, but this time they have TC compromise in mind.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke urged a House committee yesterday to approve a bill that would require insurance companies to charge rates based only partly on where the driver lives, thereby granting city dwellers some relief."
NEWS
August 22, 1992
FOR YEARS suburbanites have fled the city for fear of crime.Now some city dwellers are fretting that a suburban crime has intruded on their neighborhood.Last spring, the Federal Hill Garden Club decided to add to the floral displays neighbors had planted in front of their homes by decorating street corners. It passed the hat and bought 30 large planters, one to a corner at more than a half-dozen intersections. Each planter had flowers surrounding a centerpiece: a small evergreen shrub.One night earlier this summer, a dozen of the pots were hit by systematic thieves who neatly pulled the shrubs from the pots and carted them off. The gardeners tried again: They replaced the stolen shrubs -- this time with a smaller, cheaper version.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | April 27, 2008
More than $1 billion in development projects - offices, residences, stores and hotels that would change Baltimore's skyline and help to revitalize the city - have stalled in the face of the nationwide housing slump and faltering economy. The projects, including towers that would be Baltimore's tallest, would swell the tax base and potentially attract new - and well-heeled - city dwellers. But the housing slump has dulled the market for new condominiums and houses, and the subsequent credit crunch has made financing difficult to obtain.
NEWS
July 5, 2007
Veteran city dwellers not ready to panic I am a veteran Charles Villager, having lived here for 24 years. My husband and I are raising three children here. We feel safe. We move about the neighborhood freely, both day and night. But I almost choked on my coffee Monday morning reading the front-page article that described the fear gripping my neighborhood ("Unnerved by the violence," July 2). To claim that these recent tragic events represent a trend is inaccurate and encourages uninformed, panicked overreaction.
NEWS
February 21, 2007
ISSUE: Frustrated with the noise outside her apartment complex, Annapolis Alderwoman Julie M. Stankivic is drafting a bill that would subject city cabdrivers to fines for honking their horns when they pick up passengers. Stankivic, who has filed eight complaints in five weeks against cabdrivers, said the city is being "besieged" by the disruption familiar to most city dwellers. She prefers that the drivers use their cell phones to alert fares of their arrival. But Alfred LaGasse, executive vice president of the Taxicab, Limousine & Paratransit Association, a national organization based in Kensington, said he couldn't think of "a city in any place in the whole wide world" that has attempted to ban honking, excessive or otherwise.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2003
When Glenn Moomau throws open his living room windows, Fells Point rushes in. The distinct aroma of fresh bread, the brassy clanging of kitchens, and one of Moomau's favorites, the shrill whistle of a tugboat -- all are daily reminders that just one floor below is the neighborhood's bustling heart. Moomau, a writer and musician, lives above a vintage store called Flashbacks and a popcorn shop, with a back-window view of the kitchen at Bertha's restaurant. To enter his apartment, he must walk through a narrow alley to the back of the building and climb steep stairs.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2003
The calendar tells us that these are the first days of fall. But for wild creatures making their home in the city, the autumn shuffle is already under way. They're moving along secret highways that parallel our own: the light-rail right of way, the JFX embankment, the banks of the city's streams, even the storm sewers. Some are just passing through on their way to winter homes. Others, the young adults of the animal world, are leaving the family home and looking for places of their own. And although we rarely notice them, they're making use of every spare corner of the city.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2003
Beverly Hutson had the goods that were in high demand yesterday morning at Baltimore's weekly farmers' market: Maryland tomatoes. The first crop of the season was finally ready for picking -- and the Caroline County farmer was having no trouble selling the fruit. "People have been waiting for tomatoes," said Hutson, who has been selling her wares at the market for 24 years. "The ones in the grocery don't taste like tomatoes. Nothing tastes like a Maryland tomato and, of course, nothing looks as ugly as a Maryland tomato."
NEWS
May 23, 2000
AFTER YEARS of hard work, Christian W. Ludwig happily prepared for his graduation from the University of Maryland Dental School in Baltimore. He was a top student - but more than that a friend and leader among his classmates, someone whose spirit was uplifting for those around him. He had two kinds of days, friends said, "good days and great days." He made them feel as if they were at least as important as the goals he pursued. So when one of them was accosted by a purse snatcher on Saturday night in his Ridgelys Delight neighborhood, Mr. Ludwig ran after the robber.
NEWS
July 5, 2007
Veteran city dwellers not ready to panic I am a veteran Charles Villager, having lived here for 24 years. My husband and I are raising three children here. We feel safe. We move about the neighborhood freely, both day and night. But I almost choked on my coffee Monday morning reading the front-page article that described the fear gripping my neighborhood ("Unnerved by the violence," July 2). To claim that these recent tragic events represent a trend is inaccurate and encourages uninformed, panicked overreaction.
BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 4, 2001
"People are doing a lot of work on their houses around here - and it's in the city," observed the man who was doing some work on Terry Hollon's home in Cedarcroft. That's the attitude of a lot of people who think that living in Baltimore is an odd thing to do given all the new subdivisions going up in the counties. But Hollon, an architect, knows that North Baltimore neighborhoods such as Cedarcroft offer a style of living that can't be found in a new subdivision built in a cornfield.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 18, 2000
HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam - Sitting beneath swirling ceiling fans in his Tam Tam Computer Cafe in the heart of the city once known as Saigon, Huynh Minh is the face of tomorrow's Vietnam. A self-described "boat person" who fled the country in 1989, Minh spent five years in a refugee camp in Hong Kong, where he learned English, studied the Internet and made business contacts. Rejected as a political refugee, he returned here in 1994 and two years later opened a cyber cafe. "I want to dream of a better life, but I know this is my destiny.
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