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NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2004
Organizers of a Latino-themed festival are appealing to the Annapolis city council to help them obtain a lease for their September event. The nonprofit Association of Latin Marylanders in Anne Arundel County hopes to hold the inaugural Annapolis Latin Festival from Sept. 24 to 26 at City Dock, the city's major tourist attraction at the foot of Main Street. But festival organizers did not obtain a lease from the city and were worried they would have to reschedule or cancel the event. All events held at the City Dock must have council-approved leases.
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NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2002
To some it is "Ego Alley," where sleek sailboats and pricey yachts are on display as they tie down in historic Annapolis. But as Alexander "Skip" Parkinson loaded rusty crab pots onto his workboat there yesterday, he insisted it is still City Dock - just City Dock - to him. Parkinson remembers when the dock was full of watermen, but now he is the only one. And as Annapolis prepares to welcome the world with an international sailboat race, the city has...
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
The Annapolis city council passed Monday a $95.6 million operating budget and $10 million capital budget for next year, with a slight increase in the property tax rate and funding for projects that include a bulkhead replacement at City Dock. Mayor Josh Cohen, a Democrat, said the budget will improve government services while limiting the impact on taxpayers. "I think it's a good budget. I think it's a responsible budget," he said. Alderman Fred Paone, a Republican who voted against the measure, criticized the budget as unfixable.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2012
On a sunny spring afternoon, children continue a tradition in the downtown playground next to Annapolis Elementary School: shooting hoops, kicking a ball around, riding the swings. Adults, meanwhile, pursue another generations-old practice: arguing the future of the little park, long considered the keystone to waterfront revitalization. "This is as big for Annapolis as Harborplace was for Baltimore," said Alderman Ross H. Arnett III, who days ago joined a 6-3 majority voting to let the city pursue plans to wipe most parking spaces off City Dock and move them to the playground site, enabling the city to make better use of what some say is the most valuable piece of real estate in town, if not in Maryland.
NEWS
January 18, 1999
COMMENDATIONS are due two Annapolis-area men who rescued a 3-year-old whose stroller rolled off the dock in Annapolis last week. Mark Britton, who had just locked himself out of his car and was awaiting a family member's arrival with a second set of keys, heard the splash and jumped in. Thomas Brew, a waiter at a downtown eatery who was outside on his break, rushed over to help rescue the girl, who was cold and wet, but uninjured. These men deserve a proclamation -- and a night on the town -- for their bravery.
NEWS
By Matthew Mosk and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1999
Just when Annapolis officials thought they had quelled the storm over a charter vessel that sought a long-term slip at the City Dock, new clouds are looming.This time, the tempest is not over longtime watermen losing their moorings. It's over the notion that an upstart charter company will get prime-time harbor placement that might have been denied to others."We have for years had people with charter vessels asking to rent slips from the city, and for years they've been turned down," said Alderman Louise Hammond.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2002
Surrounded by the pricey restaurants and bars of the state capital, Annapolis' historic Market House has found a modern niche among downtown workers and tourists by serving fried chicken, crab cakes, pizza and deli sandwiches. "We've become a working man's lunch place," said Joseph Martin, 61, whose family has run Mann's Sandwiches in the nearly 150-year-old building on City Dock for 30 years. "It's a place where a guy can come eat for $3 or $4 at lunch time." But as Annapolis gears up for a major renovation of the city-owned Market House after three decades of poor maintenance, it is re-evaluating how the market works and what it sells.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun Reporter | April 16, 2008
The Annapolis City Council has formally expressed support for building a National Sailing Hall of Fame on City Dock, giving momentum to the project even as preservationists have decried any plan to raze, move or alter a historic waterfront home on the site. The resolution sponsored by Mayor Ellen O. Moyer, a strong proponent of the estimated $20 million museum, passed 6-3 Monday night in a symbolic gesture that could convince the state, which owns the property, to offer a long-term lease.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | February 22, 2009
The City of Annapolis cannot pass legislation to immediately occupy the Market House at City Dock, city officials said in response to a petition being circulated by the Annapolis Business Association requesting that the city allow tenants to move into the waterfront property by the start of spring. In its statement, the city outlines why it's not legally up to city officials to allow tenants to move in. "The city would love to resolve this matter and return the Market House to its rightful position as a jewel of our downtown and harbor area," the statement reads.
NEWS
By Joe Palazzolo and Joe Palazzolo,Special to The Sun | January 7, 2007
While the cost of improving City Dock has soared to nearly $9 million, the brunt of the project is expected to be completed in half as much time as originally planned to accommodate Annapolis' tourism calendar, according to city officials. In the lull between the powerboat show in October and the Maritime Heritage Festival in May 2008 - two of the city's largest tourist draws - two barge crews will work simultaneously, spearing new bulkheads and sheet pilings through the soupy soil on the bay floor in the project's main phase.
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