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By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1996
Zoning proposed for a recently annexed waterfront site on Bembe Beach Road would have an adverse effect on the environment, roads, schools and utilities, neighbors said last night at an Annapolis City Council meeting.In a public hearing, the residents spoke against an application by the city Planning Commission for zoning that they fear might allow construction of a six-story nursing home complex proposed by Mericare Associates Limited Partnership, a division of Landover-based Norair Inc.The nursing home would overlook the Chesapeake Bay.The 12.85-acre property was annexed from Anne Arundel County by the city government last year, and needs zoning classification before any building may begin.
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NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1995
The state Department of Housing and Community Development has agreed to help pay for a proposed apartment building in Havre de Grace for elderly residents with moderate to low incomes, but the city has yet to decide whether it will give the project $132,000 from a Community Development Block Grant.Representatives of Homes for America, the developer of the proposed $1.5 million project, faced questions on the development's cost and benefit to the city at Monday night's city council meeting.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | August 8, 1994
Parking problems that prompted a petition to make part of Westminster's Manchester Avenue one way may be resolved with a proposal that Mayor W. Benjamin Brown says will benefit the city, Westminster Cemetery Co. and the residents.At the City Council meeting tonight, Mr. Brown plans to outline a possible agreement that would reopen cemetery property adjoining Manchester Avenue to resident parking.The council is scheduled to meet at 7 p.m. in City Hall.A public hearing July 11 on a petition to make Manchester Avenue one way northbound from Main Street to Buena Vista Drive drew an overflow crowd to the council chambers.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | April 12, 1994
The new Taneytown city manager, John L. Kendall, had no opening night jitters, and made several recommendations and guided decisions during his first City Council meeting last night.He persuaded the council to forgo Saturday's trip to see a $23,900 street-sweeping machine the council had considered buying.Instead, he said, the city should look into contracting for the service, an option he had investigated.A company Mr. Kendall contacted said that for "$3,600 a year, they would do all 14.5 miles of street [in Taneytown]
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | December 13, 1993
Joseph Shepard Tullier promised before the Nov. 2 city elections to strengthen Annapolis' police and fire services.Tonight, at his first City Council meeting as an alderman, Mr. Tullier will get an up-close look at the problems confronting the two departments.Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins and the council are to meet in private at 7 p.m. Up for discussion will be the legal challenge mounted by 13 active and former police officers to last month's promotion of five minority and female officers to corporal.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer Staff writer James M. Coram contributed to this article | April 10, 1993
The Baltimore City Council was deep into nearly an hour's worth of talk on a resolution that wasn't even up for a vote. The clock was ticking. The television cameras were taking in every word.And that, 3rd District Councilman Wilbur E. Cunningham concluded, was the problem."I'm not sure why we're discussing this," Mr. Cunningham said testily into the microphone at last week's meeting when he finally got his turn to speak. "I suggest maybe we wouldn't have this conversation if we didn't have so many television cameras in the chamber right now."
NEWS
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,Staff writer | March 21, 1993
The mayor says she doesn't mind being called a dictator. To Ruth Elliott, that's just groundless name-calling, a product of bitterness among political rivals who never lived down her election.Whatever they or any of her detractors say about her management style is immaterial, she says. Mrs. Elliott says she's just done what's best for Aberdeen.Even if that meant launching an investigation of the police chief and his department, amid allegations of mismanagement and improper bookkeeping -- over the objections of City Council members and the city manager.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer | November 17, 1992
Last night's Baltimore City Council meeting was punctuated by an angry outburst from the president of a group that's pushing for a publicly owned, non-profit insurance cooperative for city drivers.Police were called to restore order and A. Robert Kaufman, president of the City Wide Insurance Coalition, was ejected from the meeting.The incident occurred as a beaming Councilman Melvin A. Stukes, D-6th, explained how he and other council members had devised a way for donors to make tax-deductible contributions to raise $60,000 needed for a study of the alternative insurance company for city drivers.
NEWS
June 23, 1991
Editor's note: The Westminster Council is considering a consultant'srecommendation to increase office space with an addition to City Hall and a new building for the Police Department. We have been asking readers what form the proposed expansion should take, whether the cityshould lease existing space, purchase available space, build an addition, construct new buildings, and whether the city should pay cash or finance it through bonds. Here are some of the replies we received:From: Robert F. BeyerWestminsterMore space is not needed.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | June 2, 1991
Just three months after Philip F. Hertz moved here to manage the county's largest municipality, he's looking for another job.In a special City Council meeting Friday afternoon, members unanimously approved an ordinance abolishing Hertz's job and returning all administrative duties to the mayor."
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