Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCity Comptroller
IN THE NEWS

City Comptroller

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 25, 1991
If Baltimore is to remain financially healthy, it will take a strong and aggressive city comptroller to watch over municipal monetary affairs. Hyman A. Pressman, who is retiring after 28 years, was vigilant in his early years before he slowed down and lapsed into an ineffective routine. On Sept. 12, Democrats have a chance to rejuvenate that important office by nominating Joseph T. "Jody" Landers III to the No. 3 job in city government.In considering the three candidates, The Sun came to the conclusion that while Mary W. Conaway, the register of wills, might learn to do the job properly, she lacks the basic qualifications for the comptroller's office and still has no grasp of what the job entails.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
When a rabbi in Northwest Baltimore reported a home break-in, a Baltimore police detective called him back to investigate. But it was Sabbath and by religious custom he was not allowed to answer the phone. He let it go to voice mail. The next day he called the detective. And called. And called. Then he called his city councilwoman, Rochelle "Rikki" Spector, wondering why the detective didn't have voice mail. Spector soon discovered: No detectives had voice mail in her district.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | December 19, 1990
One candidate in the city comptroller's race has released tax returns showing he has a modest income and must "struggle to make ends meet."The other candidate, Councilwoman Jacqueline McLean, D-2nd, the co-owner of a multimillion-dollar business, has dismissed the release as a "cheap ploy that the voters are sick and tired of."Councilman Joseph T. "Jody" Landers 3rd, D-3rd, and McLean are battling for the $53,000-a-year comptroller's job.Landers has made public 1989 tax returns showing that he and his wife, Cecilia, had an adjusted gross income of $41,256.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Baltimore Comptroller Joan M. Pratt brought a jumbo check to the city's Board of Estimates meeting Wednesday to represent the $400,000 she says the city is wasting per month on its outdated, expensive phone system. "We are losing $400,000 a month until this is implemented, fully," Pratt said of the conversion to a more-modern phone system. "We need to move beyond this. I am asking, 'Madam Mayor, let's not continue to be stuck in the mud.'" Pratt said her comments were a response to claims made by Chris Tonjes, the mayor's new IT director.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | December 20, 1993
Embattled Baltimore City Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean is taking an indefinite leave of absence from her job, effective immediately, the mayor announced today.A lawyer for Mrs. McLean informed city officials this morning of the comptroller's plans, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said at a news conference. She will continue to receive her $53,000-a-year salary "at this point," the mayor said, adding, "All of this is subject to our review."Ms. McLean is under investigation by Maryland's special prosecutor for allegations that she steered a city lease to a Federal Hill building that she and her husband own. The lease would have boosted the value of the building, which was for sale, by at least $200,000.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and Kim Clark and JoAnna Daemmrich and Kim Clark,Staff Writers Staff writer Eric Siegel contributed to this report | December 21, 1993
A defiant Baltimore Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean, saying allegations about her have disrupted the city's business, began an indefinite, paid leave of absence yesterday but refused to answer questions about the controversy engulfing her office.The embattled comptroller said last night that intense media scrutiny has obscured more pressing issues, from reducing property taxes to hiring more minority and female contractors and slashing the unemployment rate among blacks."These are real questions, real concerns that are far, far more important than Jackie McLean," she said at a news conference at her attorney's Mount Vernon office.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2001
Jacqueline F. McLean, the city's first black and first woman comptroller who was an advocate for minority business owners, died Wednesday night at Union Memorial Hospital. She was 57 and lived on North Charles Street. The cause of death was an infection, her daughter, Michelle McLean, said yesterday. "Hers was one of the real tragic stories of our community," recalled former Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke yesterday from his Washington law office. In July 1994, Mrs. McLean stepped down from the city comptroller's office and admitted her role in a corruption scandal.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | August 23, 1991
The elderly woman looks confused. Jacqueline F. McLean, a candidate for city comptroller, had just knocked on the door of the woman's Highlandtown home and asked for her vote."
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Robert Guy Matthews and Joan Jacobson and Robert Guy Matthews,Sun Staff Writers | August 16, 1995
Political novice Joan M. Pratt has raised more money in the city comptroller's race than her opponent, veteran politician Julian L. Lapides, in what has become one of the hardest-fought campaigns in the city's Democratic primary campaign, according to campaign finance reports.Ms. Pratt, a certified public accountant running in her first election, has raised $192,257 to Mr. Lapides' $156,484.In the race for City Council president, 5th District Councilwoman Vera P. Hall has easily outpaced her three opponents, raising $121,871, almost twice as much as her closest competitor, 2nd District Councilman Carl Stokes.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and M. Dion Thompson and Tom Pelton and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2001
Baltimore Comptroller Joan M. Pratt abruptly fired city Real Estate Officer Anthony J. Ambridge yesterday, giving him no explanation and causing several officials to protest that the city was losing a prudent manager of more than $3 billion in properties. Ambridge, a former 2nd District city councilman and real estate appraiser, managed city-owned buildings, arranged leases for city agencies and organized sales of tax-delinquent properties. He had held the $79,000-a-year position since 1996.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2012
The law firm of prominent lawyer and Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos is handling without charge Baltimore Comptroller Joan M. Pratt's lawsuit against the Rawlings-Blake administration's efforts to install a new city phone system that Pratt says illegally circumvented the competitive bidding process and wasted taxpayer dollars. "Mr. Angelos is a very public-spirited citizen who always looks out for the little guy," said Pratt's attorney, Charles Bernstein of the Angelos firm. "In this case, the little guy is the Baltimore taxpayer.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
Baltimore Comptroller Joan M. Pratt filed a lawsuit Friday seeking to stop Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's technology office from installing a new phone system, alleging the administration used an "underhanded, illegal technique" to bypass the competitive bidding process. The suit seeks a temporary restraining order against the Rawlings-Blake administration to prevent the Mayor's Office of Information Technology from using existing contracts with Digicon Corp. to install a Voice over Internet Protocol phone system.
NEWS
By Joan Pratt | August 13, 2012
On July 30, The Sun published an op-ed by Mary Alice Ernish, founder of the grassroots non-profit Audit Baltimore, which contained a series of questions about the city's auditing practices. This week, Comptroller Joan Pratt, who oversees the city's auditors, provided responses. • Why have some city agencies not been audited in over three decades? The city's financial statements, which are prepared by the Department of Finance, include all of the expenses and revenues of all city agencies.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for it to be mostly cloudy with a high near 86 and a 20 percent chance of precipitation. Tonight is expected to be partly cloudy, with a low around 77. But temperatures will heat up on Wednesday, when it's expected to be sunny and hot, with a high near 98. Heat index values will be as high as 102. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute....
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2011
At a panel discussion on the city's property tax rate, Joseph T. "Jody" Landers took to the lectern in the manner of a professor. He began by admonishing the only other Democratic mayoral challenger to show at the event — state Sen. Catherine Pugh — for what he apparently viewed as a glaring inaccuracy in the nomenclature she used to describe the city's infamous inventory of vacant homes. Instead of saying that there were 47,000 "boarded-up homes" in Baltimore, Landers said, she should have called them "vacant housing units.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | September 7, 2009
Baltimore officials awarded a demolition contract at the site of a proposed slots casino without public bidding, drawing concern from the city comptroller and the head of a contracting association. Rather than advertise the work as required for most city projects, the Baltimore Development Corp., the city's development arm, approached a handful of demolition firms and asked them to provide prices to knock down the Maryland Chemical building on Russell Street. The agency also sought estimates for a second project using the same selective method, to raze city-owned warehouses currently occupied by a nonprofit architectural salvage firm on Warner Street.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Fred Rasmussen, Scott Wilson and Albert Sehlstedt Jr. contributed to this article | March 16, 1996
Hyman A. Pressman, the irrepressible poetaster, erstwhile civic gadfly and longtime city comptroller, described by associates as "the champion of the little guy," died yesterday of Alzheimer's disease at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital. He was 81.Mr. Pressman came out of East Baltimore talking the 14-year-old boy orator of the 1928 presidential campaign, on the stump for Al Smith. Only old age and infirmity shut him up and ended his politicking.He became the self-anointed champion of the plain folks, using the taxpayer lawsuit as his lance, tilting at bureaucratic government.
NEWS
January 5, 2009
Roland Park proposal imperils zoning code There have been several thoughtful letters to The Baltimore Sun about the Keswick Multi-Care Center's proposed development for the open space along Falls Road owned by the Baltimore Country Club ("Readers speak out on Roland Park assisted-living facility," letters Dec. 23). But the point that cannot be overemphasized, and that makes this issue a concern for the entire city, is that this controversy is really about whether our city government will honor its moral and legal obligation to neighborhoods all over Baltimore by honoring the land's existing zoning designation.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,SUN REPORTER | October 10, 2007
Five years after Baltimore began a major effort to take control of thousands of abandoned properties, city officials are expected to announce a new program that would make it easier to sell them for redevelopment. The land bank concept, which will be unveiled today by Mayor Sheila Dixon's administration, would eliminate red tape faced when a city-owned property is put up for sale - such as the requirement for an appraisal - to speed a process that some say can hamper redevelopment. In a city where thousands of vacant homes and lots have come to define certain neighborhoods - leading to further decay and crime and falling property values - the effort could help the city bring pockets of blight back to life.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.