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By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | April 25, 2009
The U.S. Justice Department, making good on a long-standing threat, announced Friday that it had filed a civil rights lawsuit alleging that Baltimore's zoning code discriminates against those seeking drug treatment. The suit attacks a part of the city code requiring applicants for drug-treatment group homes to obtain conditional zoning ordinances from the City Council, a constraint that gives the legislative branch of city government veto authority over those facilities. Other types of disabled housing do not require council approval.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
Residents across Maryland haven't felt the last wintry bite of the snow that lashed the state Tuesday: Its impact will linger through the weekend due to frigid temperatures. Much of the snow, which measured 7 inches at BWI Tuesday night and topped 11 inches in other areas, will turn to ice. Visibility will be reduced as high winds swirl whatever doesn't freeze back into the air. "We're used to dealing with the snow. …This is extreme cold combined with precipitation, so it's the not-so-perfect storm," said Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake after a briefing on citywide emergency operations.
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NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
The Annapolis Board of Appeals has upheld a Department of Planning and Zoning decision to allow a homeless shelter to be built on Hudson Street, despite contention from a local businessman who said the shelter does not conform to the city zoning code at the proposed building site. Michael Roblyer, who has a law firm on Willow Street near the proposed shelter site, filed an appeal in February that the Light House Homeless Prevention Support Center, which is scheduled to start construction this summer at 10 Hudson St., could not be built in a BCE, or business corridor enhancement, zone because of the way certain terms are defined in the city code.
NEWS
September 3, 2013
It's always refreshing to see a large public institution encourage employees to exercise a bit more common sense in the performance of their duties. That's why, in principle, we welcome the city school system's revised student code of conduct that gives administrators more discretion in deciding how to discipline students who bring toy guns, water pistols or other inappropriate items to school. Nevertheless, the lack of transparency in the way the recent changes were carried out was unfortunate.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | April 15, 1991
If you damage Baltimore's water supply in the name of, say, your religious guru, the city code says you risk a fine of not more than $20. But if you are caught illegally opening a fire hydrant, you face a $50 fine.It is against the law in Baltimore to block sidewalks with boxes. The fine for that crime: $1. Likewise, anyone caught throwing bales -- of anything, presumably -- out of an "upper story window" faces a $20 fine.And, sports fans will note, city law says it is illegal to play professional croquet -- or basketball, lacrosse, quoits, soccer or hockey, for that matter -- on Sundays before 2 p.m. But every promoter knows tickets of admission may be sold and patrons admitted for events after noon.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | September 27, 2005
Keeping a tiger in the living room may soon be harder than it once was. And chickens clucking in the front yard? Not without a permit. Under a proposal introduced yesterday in the Baltimore City Council, owners of farm and exotic animals would have to get a permit from the city's Health Department to keep their pets. The Health Department received 110 complaints in the past year from neighbors upset over unusual pets, said Baltimore's acting commissioner of health, Francine J. Childs. Now the agency wants the authority to enforce the city code that requires owners to properly care for those animals.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 29, 1996
Bernard F. "Buzz" Murphy, longtime director of Baltimore's legislative reference service, is being transferred to an unspecified job in the city's law department, according to City Hall sources.Mr. Murphy, 51, who has run the Department of Legislative Reference since 1978, has been on extended medical leave since early November.The seldom-convened, five-member Board of Legislative Reference, which oversees the department, is expected to discuss Mr. Murphy's status at a meeting Monday. Mr. Murphy declined to comment.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | June 25, 1993
A Circuit Court judge dismissed yesterday a suit to overturn Annapolis' aldermanic redistricting plan before next fall's City Council elections.An Annapolis civic activist and a candidate for City Council charged that the boundaries were drawn illegally because the council did not swear in witnesses at a public hearing.But Judge H. Chester Goudy Jr. said the council was not required to hold a public hearing, so it was free to decide how to conduct the hearing."There's no question that the council didn't swear in witnesses at the hearing.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | April 10, 1995
The Annapolis city council will consider tonight whether to impose a new ethics code to minimize conflicts of interest in local government.The measure, proposed by Ward 5 Democratic Alderman Carl O. Snowden, would bar the mayor, aldermen and other city officials from voting on any city matters in which they might have a personal interest."
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1999
Annapolis Mayor Dean L. Johnson has appointed his spokesman as temporary city administrator after the man he selected for the job rejected it as paying too little.After an exhaustive four-month search during which he sifted through 124 resumes, Johnson said, he offered the job to an out-of-state candidate a few weeks ago.The maximum salary of $74,000, as dictated by the City Code, was not enough for the candidate.City spokesman Thomas W. Roskelly moved into City Hall yesterday to help with administrative duties while Johnson begins searching anew.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
As the area copes with a blast of Arctic air this week, weather forecasters are predicting wintry precipitation for Friday. The temperature downtown was expected to drop to 18 degrees Tuesday night, with the wind chill making it feel like 5 degrees, according to the National Weather Service. Temperatures in the area are not expected to rise much above 30 degrees until Monday. Forecasters predict Friday and Saturday nights will be especially cold, with low temperatures in the teens.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2010
Occupants of a Baltimore rowhouse where carbon monoxide gas is believed to have killed two people Tuesday had turned on a gas oven and left the door open, spreading lethal fumes through their second-floor apartment, according to the city's chief code inspector. The position of the oven has led officials to speculate that the occupants might have been using it as a heat source. City officials said someone covered the bottom of the oven with aluminum foil, blocking air vents and causing the gas to build up and then seep out. It was then swept up through a heating duct in a hallway ceiling and delivered by the ventilation system to virtually every room.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2010
Baltimore City's health commissioner, Oxiris Barbot, has declared a Code Blue alert and announced that 10 emergency shelters will extend their hours. Anticipating plummeting temperatures, the city issued the alert Saturday and urged the city's homeless and those living without heat to retreat to the 10 emergency shelters. According to the National Weather Service, temperatures will be in the high 30s today, dipping to the mid- to low 20s tonight. City officials announce a Code Blue when temperatures are expected to be below 25 degrees with winds of 15 miles per hour or higher or during other periods of intense winter weather.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2010
With temperatures in the low 20s and wind gusts of 30 miles per hour, Baltimore officials declared the season's first "Code Blue" day Tuesday, extending hours at the city's shelter and opening an additional facility to offer the homeless a respite from the elements. Forecasts called for the bitter conditions to continue Wednesday, with lows in the low 20s and gusts again of up to 30 miles per hour. City officials announce a Code Blue day when temperatures are expected to be below 25 degrees with winds of 15 miles per hour or higher, when temperatures are less than 20 degrees, or during other periods of intense winter weather.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2010
Annapolis Alderman Mathew Silverman begins four months of training for a new job as a federal agent on Monday, an opportunity that will take him away from the city council for four months. While Silverman, a county police officer who called the new position with the U.S. Department of Justice his "dream job," has received support and congratulations from Mayor Joshua J. Cohen, at least some members of the city council aren't so sure Silverman's latest career move is in the best interest of the city.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | January 13, 2010
About 30 people shook signs and chanted in front of City Hall Tuesday afternoon to protest the $83,000 annual pension Mayor Sheila Dixon will receive after resigning from office as part of a plea deal. "It's an abomination," said Sylvia Harris, the mother of former City Councilman Kenneth N. Harris Sr., who was killed in 2008. "Sheila should be ashamed of herself. There's no way we can continue to let the politicians in Maryland to continue to benefit from crime." Her son would be "horrified" by Dixon's pension, she said.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Staff writer | September 4, 1991
Annapolis Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins did not violate the city code whenhe authorized a city ambulance to take the governor's longtime companion, Hilda Mae Snoops, to Baltimore on a non-emergency run, a city panel found last night.The five-member Ethics Commission announcedits conclusion after a 30-minute meeting behind closed doors at CityHall.The commission, whose members are appointed by the mayor and confirmed by the City Council, investigated the July 24 trip at the request of Irma Sponsler, a member of the city's Democratic Central Committee.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1998
A dilapidated former theater in the Baltimore's Park Heights section has once again become the subject of a political controversy, this time over accusations that campaign leaders for a Democratic candidate for governor violated city law by hanging campaign signs on the marquee.The former Avalon Theater at 4312 Park Heights Ave. contained three giant blue and red marquee signs supporting Harford County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann for governor. However, the vacant property is deeded to the Mayor and City Council, making the property public and the hanging of political signs prohibited.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | April 25, 2009
The U.S. Justice Department, making good on a long-standing threat, announced Friday that it had filed a civil rights lawsuit alleging that Baltimore's zoning code discriminates against those seeking drug treatment. The suit attacks a part of the city code requiring applicants for drug-treatment group homes to obtain conditional zoning ordinances from the City Council, a constraint that gives the legislative branch of city government veto authority over those facilities. Other types of disabled housing do not require council approval.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
The Annapolis Board of Appeals has upheld a Department of Planning and Zoning decision to allow a homeless shelter to be built on Hudson Street, despite contention from a local businessman who said the shelter does not conform to the city zoning code at the proposed building site. Michael Roblyer, who has a law firm on Willow Street near the proposed shelter site, filed an appeal in February that the Light House Homeless Prevention Support Center, which is scheduled to start construction this summer at 10 Hudson St., could not be built in a BCE, or business corridor enhancement, zone because of the way certain terms are defined in the city code.
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