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By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2001
After 37 years of working for the city, Westminster City Clerk John D. Dudderar is retiring. Dudderar, 65, submitted his resignation Thursday. It will be effective Feb. 1. "This wasn't a surprise to anybody," he said Friday. "I've been hinting about this for some time." Dudderar, who lives just outside Westminster city limits, started working for the city as a water meter reader in 1964. He was promoted to assistant city clerk/zoning administrator in 1969 and to city clerk/zoning administrator in 1972.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Elmer A. "Peck" Jones, the longtime Baltimore City Council clerk who had been a Democratic stalwart throughout his life, died Sunday of complications from kidney failure at Baltimore Washington Medical Center in Glen Burnie. He was 101. "I knew Mr. Jones when I was in the City Council, and he was such a gentleman. He was the salt of the earth and cared deeply for his city," said Gov. Martin J. O'Malley, who added, "He was never out sick, and I always thought of him as the Cal Ripken of City Hall.
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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1999
Today, Taneytown City Clerk Linda M. Hess takes her last radiation treatment, a final zap to eradicate any vestiges of cancer that might have remained after her treatment for a breast tumor.Tomorrow, she will sit at a table at the Taneytown Shopping Center to help promote breast cancer awareness. She will talk to anyone who wants or needs a reminder of why it's important to perform regular self-examinations."They may feel more comfortable talking to someone they know," Hess said.Almost everyone in town know her. As city clerk for 23 years, Hess is one of the community's most enduring public officials.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
At least two members of the Annapolis City Council are considering putting an end to late-night meetings, after a public hearing this week stretched until 3 a.m. The City Council chambers were packed with more than 100 people on Thursday night who wanted to weigh in on a new master plan for City Dock and a rezoning proposal for properties along one side of the dock. The meeting started shortly after 7 p.m. on Thursday, and the first public hearing on the master plan concluded in the 11 o'clock hour.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2002
Former Carroll County Attorney Laurell Taylor has been hired as Westminster's new city clerk and zoning administrator. Taylor, who resigned from the county post in August, replaces John Dudderar, who retired last month after working 37 years for the city. "She's a perfect fit," Council President Damian L. Halstad said of Taylor, who was appointed to the post at last night's Common Council meeting. "She's very smart, approachable and friendly. Her experience at the county with zoning issues of all types will really help her with this job."
NEWS
February 17, 1991
A Virginia man is Havre de Grace's first manager.Dennis Sparks, ofBowling Green, Va., was selected for the job over 50 applicants. City officials expect Sparks to be on the job in several weeks, pending salary negotiations.Sparks runs a management consulting firm in Bowling Green. He also served as a county administrator in Washington County in western Virginia from 1981 to 1984, city officials said.Sparks' salary will be between $40,000 and $45,000, city officials said.He will be responsible for preparing annual budgets, carrying out the council's decisions and overseeing the daily operations of the city's staff of 75, including the police, planning and public works departments.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2002
Developers who want city water and sewer service on land adjacent to Westminster's city limits would have to first be annexed into the city, under three measures proposed last night by the Westminster Common Council. Because Westminster's water and sewer service area extends well outside city limits, it stands to gain tax revenue by annexing businesses on adjacent land. The measures - two ordinances and an amendment to the county's master plan - are designed to bolster enforcement of an agreement between Carroll County and Westminster suggesting that land proposed for development that would use city water and sewer service would be annexed before receiving the services.
NEWS
November 27, 2005
1878: THE FIRST CITY On Nov. 28, 1878, the town commissioners of Havre de Grace met for the last time: Havre de Grace was to become the first community in Harford to be designated a city. Havre de Grace would have a six-member council and an elected mayor. On Jan. 6, 1879, the first elections took place. J. Thompson Frieze became the first mayor. In its first meeting, the council elected Hollis Courtney Jr. as council president. By the second meeting, the City Council had approved 15 ordinances, which offer insight into life in the new city.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2002
In 1964, when Westminster spent about $1 million to acquire the Maryland Waterworks, the city got its own water system, miles and miles of pipelines, a reservoir. And John Dudderar. "That was a great deal," former Mayor Kenneth A. Yowan said. "The city bought the waterworks and they threw in John Dudderar -- who became an institution." Dudderar, now 66, was a meter reader at the time of the sale, but it wasn't long before he was promoted to assistant city clerk and then to city clerk and zoning administrator.
NEWS
July 1, 2005
OWINGS MILLS County begins review of development rules Baltimore County officials joined yesterday with builders, community leaders and environmental activists to begin weighing changes in the county's development and environmental regulations. County Executive James T. Smith Jr. called the yearlong review, launched yesterday with a meeting in Owings Mills, "a great step forward" toward updating county regulations. Smith, who has promoted redevelopment in the county, said he hoped the "Builders for the Bay Roundtable" would produce consensus on how to protect the county's natural resources while providing more flexibility to builders in redeveloping sites.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 17, 2011
Kathleen Arlee Petry "Kathy" Mathias, who was Ocean City 's town clerk and a major behind-the-scenes figure in the resort city where she had worked for several mayors and city managers, died Monday of breast cancer at her home there. She was 58. "Kathy was one of the finest people I've ever known, and I had the pleasure of her working for me when I was mayor and she was my secretary," said Roland "Fish" Powell, who served as Ocean City mayor from 1986 to 1996.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 7, 2011
Robert H. Bouse Sr., the retired Circuit Court for Baltimore City clerk who later became a chief deputy clerk at the federal Bankruptcy Court of Maryland, died of cancer Feb. 28 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 91. He was the son of John H. Bouse, former state senator who was also Baltimore's register of wills. Mr. Bouse, a Baltimore native, spent his life in the same home on South Ann Street in Fells Point. He was a 1936 Mount Saint Joseph High School graduate and attended Loyola College and the University of Baltimore Law School.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | November 8, 2006
Brian D. Snyder, the city of Annapolis' purchasing agent, now sees yellow garden roses out his window, an apt symbol for the new digs of six city departments and agencies. The 20,000-square-foot space, with its warm wood floors, exposed brick walls and skylighted ceilings, is a big step up for Snyder and 70 co-workers, who moved from cramped, cluttered city offices spread across downtown. In hopes of improving staff cohesion, communication and public service, the departments of Public Works, Central Services, Planning and Zoning, and Human Resources, as well as the Office of Law and the city clerk are now housed under the same roof, in the former Hopkins Furniture store on Main Street.
NEWS
November 27, 2005
1878: THE FIRST CITY On Nov. 28, 1878, the town commissioners of Havre de Grace met for the last time: Havre de Grace was to become the first community in Harford to be designated a city. Havre de Grace would have a six-member council and an elected mayor. On Jan. 6, 1879, the first elections took place. J. Thompson Frieze became the first mayor. In its first meeting, the council elected Hollis Courtney Jr. as council president. By the second meeting, the City Council had approved 15 ordinances, which offer insight into life in the new city.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2005
The director of a government watchdog group said he plans to return this week to review campaign finance reports at the Annapolis city clerk's office, where he says staff improperly monitored him as he looked at the documents. James Browning, the executive director of Common Cause Maryland, said staff told him Thursday that he could not view files listing campaign contributions for Mayor Ellen O. Moyer without someone sitting next to him. "We're going back on Tuesday to resume the search," Browning said.
NEWS
July 1, 2005
OWINGS MILLS County begins review of development rules Baltimore County officials joined yesterday with builders, community leaders and environmental activists to begin weighing changes in the county's development and environmental regulations. County Executive James T. Smith Jr. called the yearlong review, launched yesterday with a meeting in Owings Mills, "a great step forward" toward updating county regulations. Smith, who has promoted redevelopment in the county, said he hoped the "Builders for the Bay Roundtable" would produce consensus on how to protect the county's natural resources while providing more flexibility to builders in redeveloping sites.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2001
Working in municipal government might run in the family for Taneytown's new city manager. Patrick Nield's father was a school board president. His grandfather served as mayor of Ridgeley, W.Va., for 36 years. And his second cousin was a city clerk and sheriff for more than a decade. The new city manager was sheriff of Mineral County, W.Va., for eight years. His duties there ranged from local law enforcement to collecting taxes. Taking the city manager job made sense to Nield, 33, a former Army infantryman and father of four small children.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2002
Westminster's City Hall gradually would grow to house nearly all government departments under a proposal to be outlined at the Common Council meeting tonight. The proposed $4 million expansion would be carried out in stages, allowing business to be conducted while a three-story building rises behind the existing City Hall. "The important thing about the space plan is that while the addition is being done the business of the city doesn't have to stop," said Thomas B. Beyard, director of planning and public works.
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