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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
When Dr. Frank M. Reid III, senior pastor at Bethel AME Church, said "bless your heart" to his congregation this Sunday, he meant it literally. It was Red Dress Sunday at the church off Druid Hill Avenue, an annual event launched in Baltimore by St. Agnes Hospital to raise awareness of the dangers of heart disease. It's the number one killer of women in the United States, and an even greater danger to African-American women. The Baltimore event, which localizes a national movement, began a decade ago with three city churches and has since expanded to 130. The women in the pews were predominantly African-American women clad in red shirts, skirts, dresses, hats and even hair for the occasion.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
The Rev. Harry L. Hoffman III, a retired Episcopal rector who had been associated with churches in Maryland, Virginia and Wyoming, and was an ardent conservationist and outdoorsman, died Aug. 1 of complications from Parkinson's disease at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. He was 87. "Harry was much loved by a great number of people," said the Rt. Rev. John L. Raab, retired bishop suffragan of the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland, who is currently serving as bishop in residence at St. John's Episcopal Church in Ellicott City.
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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1999
Baltimore's mayoral hopefuls worked the crowds yesterday at city churches and Halloween events, as the two candidates entered the final stretch toward Election Day tomorrow.Democrat Martin O'Malley and Republican David F. Tufaro had a fairly light schedule in their campaigns, which have survived an often brutal 12-month mayoral race that had as many as 27 candidates."We've said and done about everything we can," said Tufaro as he campaigned at the Baltimore Zoo. "There isn't much more to say."
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
When Dr. Frank M. Reid III, senior pastor at Bethel AME Church, said "bless your heart" to his congregation this Sunday, he meant it literally. It was Red Dress Sunday at the church off Druid Hill Avenue, an annual event launched in Baltimore by St. Agnes Hospital to raise awareness of the dangers of heart disease. It's the number one killer of women in the United States, and an even greater danger to African-American women. The Baltimore event, which localizes a national movement, began a decade ago with three city churches and has since expanded to 130. The women in the pews were predominantly African-American women clad in red shirts, skirts, dresses, hats and even hair for the occasion.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | March 9, 1995
They can't teach religious faith inside public schools -- the separation of church and state prohibits that -- but some local women want to deliver Christianity to city children after school."
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
Answering a call from their pastor, their mayor and a higher power, about 70 men joined hands in a West Baltimore church last night and vowed to take some of the city's wayward teens under their wings. About 100 members of Bethel AME Church have agreed to mentor young people through the Baltimore Rising program, responding to pleas from the Rev. Frank M. Reid III and Mayor Martin O'Malley to get involved in the lives of city teen-agers, who have been killing each other at an alarming rate.
NEWS
May 23, 1994
Church steeples are so much a part of the Baltimore skyline that most of us take them for granted. Those spires point to the skies, but beneath them worldly concerns are as real as anywhere. That truth has been brought home again with announcements in recent days that the Archdiocese of Baltimore is considering closing a number of urban parishes. In a city where waves of Catholic immigrants built churches that served as the center of European-style neighborhoods, that list inevitably includes parishes with rich histories and notable architecture.
NEWS
October 4, 1995
IT SHOULD come as no surprise that the booming growth of the Catholic church in Baltimore's suburbs -- documented in a recent Sun story by reporter James Bock -- has coincided with the flight of the white middle-class from city to suburbia. Protestant and Jewish congregations with deep roots in Baltimore have likewise followed their members and established new suburban addresses.Growth of the Catholic population outside the city limits is nonetheless remarkable, particularly in the newer suburbs and the exurbs.
NEWS
February 7, 1995
"Clearly, some people will be angry, some people will be upset. But the status quo is not possible."Those were the words of Auxiliary Bishop John H. Ricard three months ago as he anticipated the reaction to the Baltimore Roman Catholic archdiocese's downsizing of roughly a dozen city parishes. The long-awaited announcement by Cardinal William H. Keeler and Bishop Ricard finally came last Sunday: Our Lady of Lourdes in Ashburton will be closed Feb. 19 and 13 other churches will be merged or otherwise scaled back.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2000
St. Stanislaus Kostka Catholic Church, a Fells Point parish that has served Baltimore's Polish community for more than 120 years but whose congregation has dwindled in recent years, is being closed by the Archdiocese of Baltimore. Bishop Gordon D. Bennett told parishioners after the 10 a.m. Mass yesterday that the final service will be held May 7, two weeks after Easter. The last Roman Catholic church to close in the city was St. Bernard's in Waverly in 1997. "I feel so bad," said Mel DeMartin, a lifelong parishioner.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
Ocean City fire investigators believe that the man who entered a church on fire, igniting a blaze that killed its pastor, had poured gasoline on himself as part of a suicide plot. The fire marshal's office said Tuesday that John Raymond Sterner covered himself in fuel and set himself on fire just before he burst into St. Paul's by the Sea Episcopal Church as volunteers were opening a Thanksgiving food bank Nov. 26. Sterner died in the blaze, which quickly spread and was responsible for the death of the Rev. David A. Dingwall, whom firefighters found unconscious on the second floor.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
A fire in a church rectory in Ocean City Tuesday that left two dead began when a person on fire entered the ministry's offices, according to the Episcopal Diocese of Easton. One of those killed in the three-alarm blaze was Rev. David Dingwall, the pastor of the church, St. Paul's By The Sea Episcopal, diocese officials said. The second man who died has not yet been publicly identified. The fire began at around 9:25 a.m. in the rear offices of the rectory at 302 N. Baltimore Avenue "when a person on fire entered the Shepherd's Crook ministry offices," the diocese said on its website.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Mary S. "Molly" Jameson, who established and directed two outreach programs at St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church in Baltimore, died Sunday of breast cancer at her Lutherville home. She was 81. The daughter of a building contractor and an educator, Mary Smart was born in Garrett County and raised in Oakland, Friendsville and Grantsville. After graduating from Oakland High School in 1948, she enrolled at what is now Towson University, where she earned a bachelor's degree in 1952.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
The gun used in the killings at St. Peter's Episcopal Church in Ellicott City last week was registered to the homeless man who allegedly shot two women and then himself, Howard County police said Monday. The gun was found near the body of Douglas Franklin Jones, 56, in woods next to the church. Police said he shot the Rev. Mary-Marguerite Kohn, 62, a co-rector of the church, and Brenda Brewington, 59, a church administrator, before turning the gun on himself. A church custodian found the two women shot in a church office and called police about 5:20 p.m. Thursday, police said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and David Greisman, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2012
The Rev. Mary-Marguerite Kohn, 62, died Saturday night at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center of injuries sustained Thursday in a double shooting at St. Peter's Episcopal Church in Ellicott City, police said Sunday. Kohn was co-rector of the Howard County church. The second woman, church employee Brenda Brewington, 59, died Thursday. Kohn had been on life support at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center since Thursday. Police said they had taken Kohn's body to the state medical examiner's office for an autopsy.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
The man who police say shot and critically wounded a co-rector and killed another worker at an Ellicott City church last week was angry about being told to limit his visits to the food pantry, church leaders said in a statement on Saturday. The shootings of the two women have plunged the congregation of St. Peter's Episcopal Church, founded in Howard County in 1842, into mourning. The church has announced a private service for Sunday at 10 a.m. The statement from the church says a custodian found the victims in an office.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 23, 2006
I've never met Joe and Peggy Werner, but I endorse their suggestion that a memorable Christmas Eve could be spent in church along Baltimore's Charles Street corridor. They recommended starting early, dropping in here and there, and breaking for dinner. Joe recalled a Christmas Eve experience at SS. Philip and James Roman Catholic Church in Charles Village where gowned hostesses acting as ushers invited him to a post-midnight parish reception.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
Jerry Lymas hasn't given up on Baltimore, not even on the city street corners that evoke the most fear among outsiders.Mr. Lymas is a true believer that decaying city neighborhoods will come back to life. And he believes churches must lead the revival. He's counting on it.In his self-appointed mission he calls "50 Churches & 50 Corners," Mr. Lymas hopes to beautify Baltimore's communities by replacing eyesores at Baltimore's blighted intersections with dozens of new and renovated buildings.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
A woman was found fatally shot Thursday evening in St. Peter's Episcopal Church in Ellicott City, a man was discovered dead on the grounds nearby and another woman was critically injured by gunfire — turning a quiet, family neighborhood near the historic downtown into a crime scene. Police and SWAT team members swarmed the 3600 block of Rogers Ave., just up the hill from the historic mill town's Main Street, and blocked off a section of the road after receiving a call about 5:20 p.m. from a custodian at the church, who said he'd found two women in a church office suffering from gunshot wounds.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
When the Rev. Keron Sadler of the NAACP tried to persuade churches around the country to play a more active role in HIV/AIDS education, she drew some hostile reactions. One pastor said his congregants might think he was gay. Another said AIDS is a curse. Yet another walked out of the room rather than discuss the topic. Those reactions highlight the challenges facing Baltimore as it enlists church outreach for its ambitious goal of curbing new HIV/AIDS cases by 25 percent in the next four years.
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