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NEWS
July 6, 2004
Those pesky city limits Circuit Court clerk Frank M. Conaway, who is also a mayoral candidate, has filed a lawsuit in which he called for 17 high-ranking city officials to be removed from their jobs, alleging that they do not live or vote in Baltimore as required by the city charter. Though much of Conaway's information has proved incorrect, maybe there's a reason for confusion. Some city officials themselves appear to be confused. For example, on the most recent disclosure form Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark filed with the city's ethics office, he wrote that, as of June 30, 2003, he did not have a financial interest in any real property in the city.
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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2004
Disputing claims that Mayor Martin O'Malley has a "carpetbagger Cabinet," Baltimore officials said yesterday that only four of the 17 people named in a lawsuit must by law live and be registered to vote in the city - and that those four meet the requirements. But Frank M. Conaway, the Baltimore mayoral candidate and Circuit Court clerk behind the suit, was not backing down. He contends that under the city charter, O'Malley must fire some of his top aides - including his police commissioner - because they belatedly moved or registered to vote in the city.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2004
Frank M. Conaway, Baltimore mayoral candidate and Circuit Court clerk, filed a lawsuit yesterday calling for 17 high-ranking city officials to be removed from their jobs, claiming they do not live or vote in Baltimore as required by the city charter. But several of the officials named in the lawsuit said last night that Conaway's information is flawed because they do, in fact, live and vote in the city. "It is certainly news to me I don't live in the city. It will be news to my husband, also," said Kristen Mahoney, executive director of the Mayor's Office of Criminal Justice.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2003
NOT ONLY CAN you fight City Hall, you can even win -- at least temporarily. But you might have to fight again. Just ask Ward Eisinger, president of the Remington Neighborhood Alliance. For months, the 36-year-old lab technician led a lonely and seemingly futile fight against a bill that would give the city the right of eminent domain to seize properties for private economic development projects. Eisinger's principal concern was that the bill would allow the city to condemn homes in commercially zoned areas -- structures abundant not only in his North Baltimore neighborhood, but in many communities across the city.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2003
SALISBURY - A growing number of residents and civic leaders in this Eastern Shore town of 25,000 are trying to do what no one in Maryland has ever done - recall their mayor and City Council. Three months after launching a petition drive, organizers say their pursuit of 30 percent of Salisbury's registered voters - the number needed to force a recall vote - is nearing an end. They predict they'll have enough signatures in the next month or so to trigger a special election. Should the drive begin to falter, they say, the bare-knuckles nature of Salisbury politics will provide the impetus to take them over the top. Critics say bickering among the five council members and two-term Mayor Barrie Parsons Tilghman has made public access cable broadcasts of council meetings a new form of entertainment in town.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2002
A top Baltimore official ordered an Odenton charter service yesterday to stop landing helicopters on a downtown parking garage after learning such flights had been happening without city approval dating to May 2001. Prompted by an inquiry from The Sun, zoning officials told the company, Capitol Rising, not to land or take off at the 10-story garage next to the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel at Inner Harbor East. "Helicopters do crash," said Michael Savino, superintendent for zoning enforcement.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
The City Council held a hearing last night on two proposed city charter amendments to trim its membership in the wake of calls to shrink the body because of the declining city population. Though the bills to reduce the 19-seat council were proposed by two of its members, it appears unlikely that either will pass. City Council President Sheila Dixon, who is proposing cutting the council by four, said that she surveyed members after the meeting and few were in support of her measure. "One of my colleagues just told me, `Hell, no,'" Dixon said.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2002
Carrying signs declaring "Graziano must go," about 20 leaders of city public housing residents stormed into the City Council meeting last night demanding that its members hear their complaints about Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano. The residents' protest temporarily stopped proceedings as council members scrambled to quiet them, and council President Sheila Dixon thumped her gavel, ordering them to leave. Two security guards were called to usher them to a room outside the council chambers.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2002
Facing a push by community activists to let voters decide whether the Baltimore City Council should shrink, two council members plan to introduce bills to trim the 19-member body themselves. The bills to be introduced Monday by City Council President Sheila Dixon and Councilman Robert W. Curran, a Northeast Baltimore Democrat, will surely generate heated debate about the council's future. But council members and political observers say it is too early to tell if council members will vote to sacrifice their $48,000-a-year jobs.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2001
The Baltimore City Council should be trimmed from 19 members to 15 in light of the city's declining population, an advisory panel says in a report to be released tomorrow. A report to be unveiled by the President's Advisory Commission on Council Representation, formed last fall to study the makeup of the City Council, also recommends making it easier for the council to override mayoral vetoes and urges that other changes be considered that could alter the balance of power between the mayor and the City Council.
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