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NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | March 12, 2006
As mayor of Baltimore, William Donald Schaefer was famously impatient. "Do it now" became his mantra, his byword and his creed. And you couldn't argue with his success. Think Inner Harbor, World Trade Center, Convention Center, a Hyatt Hotel and gritty Baltimore transformed into a tourist destination. Mr. Schaefer was a magician. He willed his city back to life. He made Congress and presidents notice and try to copy some of his more successful efforts. It was, therefore, unseemly for this newspaper and this reporter to say, "Wait a minute; you haven't been playing by the rules.
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NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | October 2, 2005
In the spirit of 1708, when a royal charter was handed down to Colonial Annapolis, a town crier Friday proclaimed the first event of the Annapolis Charter 300 celebration: the unveiling of an outdoor mural on the side of the Hillman municipal parking garage. Under clear skies, a small crowd congregated by Gorman Street, a side street off Main Street that the 36-by-14-foot gauzy mural will face. The lively Colonial life mural is actually a digital image of an oil painting done by Annapolis artist Lee A. Boynton 10 years ago that hangs in City Hall.
NEWS
June 10, 2005
Seventy years ago this month, Ellicott City, which had been an independently chartered town since 1867, had its charter revoked by the state legislature at the request of local residents, according to Howard County: A Pictorial Historyby Joetta M. Cramm. Blame it on liquor, at least indirectly. "Before Prohibition, due to a high license fee for saloons, the town charged a very small real estate tax," Cramm writes. "With Prohibition, the tax increase led to the many bitter protests that finally brought about the surrender of the town charter."
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2004
A group of Northeast Baltimore parents that feels it has been thwarted in its attempt to start a charter school has asked the state school board to intervene in the local decision-making process. The appeal to the State Board of Education is the second this summer, signaling a growing frustration among parents and community groups who see local school boards as roadblocks to opening charter schools. "I had been hoping to work within the system," said Bobbi MacDonald, founder of City Neighbors Charter School.
NEWS
July 6, 2004
Those pesky city limits Circuit Court clerk Frank M. Conaway, who is also a mayoral candidate, has filed a lawsuit in which he called for 17 high-ranking city officials to be removed from their jobs, alleging that they do not live or vote in Baltimore as required by the city charter. Though much of Conaway's information has proved incorrect, maybe there's a reason for confusion. Some city officials themselves appear to be confused. For example, on the most recent disclosure form Police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark filed with the city's ethics office, he wrote that, as of June 30, 2003, he did not have a financial interest in any real property in the city.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2004
Disputing claims that Mayor Martin O'Malley has a "carpetbagger Cabinet," Baltimore officials said yesterday that only four of the 17 people named in a lawsuit must by law live and be registered to vote in the city - and that those four meet the requirements. But Frank M. Conaway, the Baltimore mayoral candidate and Circuit Court clerk behind the suit, was not backing down. He contends that under the city charter, O'Malley must fire some of his top aides - including his police commissioner - because they belatedly moved or registered to vote in the city.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2004
Frank M. Conaway, Baltimore mayoral candidate and Circuit Court clerk, filed a lawsuit yesterday calling for 17 high-ranking city officials to be removed from their jobs, claiming they do not live or vote in Baltimore as required by the city charter. But several of the officials named in the lawsuit said last night that Conaway's information is flawed because they do, in fact, live and vote in the city. "It is certainly news to me I don't live in the city. It will be news to my husband, also," said Kristen Mahoney, executive director of the Mayor's Office of Criminal Justice.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2003
NOT ONLY CAN you fight City Hall, you can even win -- at least temporarily. But you might have to fight again. Just ask Ward Eisinger, president of the Remington Neighborhood Alliance. For months, the 36-year-old lab technician led a lonely and seemingly futile fight against a bill that would give the city the right of eminent domain to seize properties for private economic development projects. Eisinger's principal concern was that the bill would allow the city to condemn homes in commercially zoned areas -- structures abundant not only in his North Baltimore neighborhood, but in many communities across the city.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2003
SALISBURY - A growing number of residents and civic leaders in this Eastern Shore town of 25,000 are trying to do what no one in Maryland has ever done - recall their mayor and City Council. Three months after launching a petition drive, organizers say their pursuit of 30 percent of Salisbury's registered voters - the number needed to force a recall vote - is nearing an end. They predict they'll have enough signatures in the next month or so to trigger a special election. Should the drive begin to falter, they say, the bare-knuckles nature of Salisbury politics will provide the impetus to take them over the top. Critics say bickering among the five council members and two-term Mayor Barrie Parsons Tilghman has made public access cable broadcasts of council meetings a new form of entertainment in town.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2002
A top Baltimore official ordered an Odenton charter service yesterday to stop landing helicopters on a downtown parking garage after learning such flights had been happening without city approval dating to May 2001. Prompted by an inquiry from The Sun, zoning officials told the company, Capitol Rising, not to land or take off at the 10-story garage next to the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel at Inner Harbor East. "Helicopters do crash," said Michael Savino, superintendent for zoning enforcement.
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